Page:The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma (Birds Vol 1).djvu/221

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TROCHALOPTERUM.

(175) Trochalopterum lineatum imbricatum.

The Bhutan Streaked Laughing-Thrush.

Garrulax imbricatus Blyth, J. A. S. B., xii, p. 95l (1843) (Bhutan).
Trochalopterum imbricatum. Blanf. & Oates, i, p. 102.

Vernacular names. None recorded.

Description. Differs from the other three races in having the head, neck and mantle concolorous with the rest of the body, the shafts black and glistening; the lores, supercilium and sides of the head greyish-brown with white shafts.

Colours of soft parts not recorded.

Measurements as in T. l. lineatum.

Distribution. Bhutan only.

Nidification and Habits unknown.

(176) Trochalopterum henrici.

Prince Henry's Laughing-Thrush.

Trochalopterum henrici Oustalet, Ann. Sci. Nat., (7) xii, p. 274 (1891) (Tibet).

Vernacular names. Jorno = the lady (Tibet).

Description. Upper parts and wing-coverts dark olive-brown, the crown slightly darker; lores and a line through the eye and ear-coverts dark chocolate; quills blackish edged with lavender-grey; tail blackish brown, broadly tipped with white; a broad white stripe through the cheeks; a small white supercilium; below the same colour as above, but paler and the flanks and under tail- coverts chestnut-red.

Colours of soft parts. Bill and legs dark plumbeous; iris crimson.

Measurements. Total length about 270 to 280 mm.; wing 110 to 115 mm.; tail about 150 mm.; culmen about 22 mm.; tarsus about 37 mm.

Distribution. Tibet, and it has been obtained by Col. F. M. Bailey at Shoaka, 9,000 feet, in the Mishmi Hills.

Nidification unknown.

Habits. "It is found in the same poplar and alder bushes as the Babax, but also comes up quite close to the villages. It has the characteristic habits of a Babbler to a marked degree, roves about in parties of eight or more individuals, chatters most noisily, uttering its fluty call of ' Whoh-hee Whoh-hee,' is always on the move, scampering along the branches, seldom showing itself, and flying very low across a clearance to the next cover." (Waddell).