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[ILIAD
CATALOGUE OF ACHÆAN FORCES

the son of Cæneus. And with these there came forty ships.

748 Guneus brought two and twenty ships from Cyphus, and he was followed by the Enienes and the valiant Peræbi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona, and held the lands round the lovely river Titaresius, which sends its waters into the Peneus. They do not mingle with the silver eddies of the Peneus, but flow on the top of them like oil; for the Titaresius is a branch of dread Orcus and of the river Styx.

756 Of the Magnetes, Prothoüs son of Tenthredon was commander. They were they that dwelt about the river Peneus and Mt. Pelion. Prothoüs, fleet of foot, was their leader, and with him there came forty ships.

760 Such were the chiefs and princes of the Danaans. Who, then, O Muse, was the foremost, whether man or horse, among those that followed after the sons of Atreus?

764 Of the horses, those of the son of Pheres were by far the finest. They were driven by Eumelus, and were as fleet as birds. They were of the same age and colour, and perfectly matched in height. Apollo, of the silver bow, had bred them in Perea—both of them mares, and terrible as Mars in battle. Of the men, Ajax, son of Telamon, was much the foremost so long as Achilles' anger lasted, for Achilles excelled him greatly and he had also better horses; but Achilles was now holding aloof at his ships by reason of his quarrel with Agamemnon, and his people passed their time upon the sea shore, throwing discs or aiming with spears at a mark, and in archery. Their horses stood each by his own chariot, champing lotus and wild celery.[1] The chariots were housed under cover, but their owners, for lack of leadership, wandered hither and thither about the host and went not forth to fight.

  1. The plant σέλινον may be seen growing abundantly on the site of Selinunte in Sicily. The coins of Selinunte sufficiently prove it to have been the wild celery, which is not uncommon in England.