Page:The L-poem of the Arabs.djvu/29

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45 (61–61).

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And on a day of (the canicular period of) Sirius, when his gossamer floats melting about, and his vipers, among his: over-heated rocks, writhe in agony,

46 (62–62).

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I set up my face right against it, with no screen in front thereof, and no covert, save a tattered At-hami rag,

47 (63–63).

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And a shaggy head of hair, on which when the wind blows, there fly out, as fluffs from its tufts, what might be combed away;

48 (64–64).

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Far, in time, from the touch of oil, and from a riddance of vermin; soiled with filth; dishevelled.

49 (53–49).

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And if thou see me, like an antelope of the sands, exposed to the sun on scanty fare, I go barefoot, and I wear no sandals.

59 (54–50).

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For verily, I am a slave to patience. I wear its armour over the like of the heart of the wolf-hyana; and discretion I practise.

51 (45–45).

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(I am a man) persecuted by assaults that imperil life and limb, and that gamble on his flesh as against his death shriek,-which of them is destined to be first had;

52 (51–47).

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And a familiar of cares, which cease not to revisit him, returning like the quartan ague; nay, which are yet heavier to bear.

53 (52–48).

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When they beset me, I drive them away. Then, verily, they spring round, and come upon me from a little below, and from just above.

54 (65–65).

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And in a wilderness, (bare) as the back of a shield, which I have traversed, the hither and thither portions of the interior of which are not usually travelled through,

55 (66–66).

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The beginnings of which I have brought together with its endings (by journeying); mounting on a hill-top, to sit down at times; and (again) standing up erect (on the out look for foes).