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THE PENTAMERONE.

or 'Sca-fish,' or 'Angel,' or 'Anola tranola,' or 'King Macebearer,' or 'Blind cat,'[1] or 'The lamp to the lamp,' or 'Draw my curtain,' or 'Long-beam,' or 'Hen and chickens,' or 'The old man is not come,' or 'Leap-frog,' or 'Ride a cheriy-stone,' or 'Mannikin leap!' or 'The Robbers,' or 'Come hither, come hither,' or 'Who has the needle and thread?' or 'Bird, bird, an iron handle,' or 'Wine or vinegar,' or Open, open the door for poor Gosshawk!'[2]

But the time being at length come for the feast, they all seated themselves at table; and when they had eaten their fill, the Prince bade Zeza bear herself like a brave woman and begin her story; whereupon Zeza, who had her head so full of stories that they overflowed from her lips, calling them over one by one, selected as the best that which I will now tell you.

  1. Blindman's Buff'?
  2. i.e. 'Frog in the middle'?—The Neapolitan names for these games, and remarks on them, I shall probably give in the Notes to this volume.