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MEATS. 143

TO BROIL THE FORE-QUARTER OF LAMB.

TAKE off the shoulder and lay it upon the gridiron with the breast ; cut in two parts, to facilitate its cooking; put a tin sheet on top of the meat, and a weight upon that; turn the meat around frequently to prevent its burning ; turn over as soon as cooked on one side ; renew the coals occasionally, that all parts may cook alike ; when done, sea- son with butter, pepper and salt exactly like beefsteak. It takes some time to broil it well ; but when done it will be found to be equal to broiled chicken, the flavor being more delicate than when cooked otherwise. Serve with cream sauce, made as follows : Heat a table- spoonful of butter in a saucepan, add a teaspoonful of flour and stir until perfectly smooth ; then add, slowly stirring in, a cup of cold milk ; let it boil up once, and season to taste with salt and pepper and a tea- spoonful of finely chopped fresh parsley. Serve in a gravy boat, all

hot.

LAMB STEW.

CUT up the lamb into small pieces (after removing all the fat) say about two inches square. Wash it well and put it over the fire, with just enough cold water to cover it well, and let it heat grad- ually. It should stew gently until it is partly done ; then add a few thin slices of salt pork, one or two onions sliced up fine, some pep- per and salt if needed, and two or three raw potatoes cut up into inch pieces. Cover it closely and stew until the meat is tender. Drop in a few made dumplings, made like short biscuit, cut out very small. Cook fifteen minutes longer. Thicken the gravy with a little flour moistened with milk. Serve.

PRESSED LAMB.

THE meat, either shoulder or leg, should be put to boil in the morn- ing with water just enough to cover it ; when tender, season with salt and pepper, then keep it over the fire until very tender and the juice nearly boiled out. Remove it from the fire-place in a wooden chop- ping bowl, season more if necessary, chop it up like hash. Place it in a breadpan, press out all the juice, and put it in a cool place to harden. The pressing is generally done by placing a dish over the meat and putting a flat-iron upon that. Nice cut up cold into thin slices, and the broth left from the meat would make a nice soup

served with it, adding vegetables and spices. 10

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