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Page:The White House Cook Book.djvu/173

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MEATS. 153

ten tablespoonf uls of powdered sage, one ounce each of parsley, savory, marjoram and thyme mixed. Two teaspoonfuls of cayenne pepper, the same of black, one grated nutmeg, one teaspoonful of cloves, one minced onion, salt to taste. Chop or grind the meat and suet; sea- son, and stuff into beef skins ; tie these up, prick each in several places to allow the escape of steam ; put into hot, not boiling, water, and heat gradually to the boiling point. Cook slowly for one hour ; take out the skins and lay them to dry in the sun, upon clean sweet straw or hay. Rub the outside of the skins with oil or melted butter, and place in a cool, dry cellar. If you wish to keep them more than a week, rub gin- ger or pepper on the outside, then wash it off before using. This is eaten without further cooking. Cut in round slices and lay sliced lemon around the edge of the dish, as many like to squeeze a few drops upon the sausage before eating. These are very nice smoked

like hams.

COUNTRY PORK SAUSAGES.

Six POUNDS lean fresh pork, three pounds of chine fat, three table- spoonfuls of salt, two of black pepper, four tablespoonf uls of pounded and sifted sage, two of summer savory. Chop the lean and fat pork finely, mix the seasoning in with your hands, taste to see that it has the right flavor, then put them into cases, either the cleaned intestines of the hog, or make long, narrow bags of stout muslin, large enough to contain each enough sausage for a family dish. Fill these with the meat, dip in melted lard, and hang them in a cool, dry, dark place. Some prefer to pack the meat in jars, pouring melted lard over it, covering the top, to be taken out as wanted and made into small round cakes with the hands, then fried brown. Many like spices added to the seasoning cloves, mace and nutmeg. This is a matter of taste.

Marion Harland.

TO FRY SAUSAGES.

PUT a small piece of lard or butter into the frying pan. Prick the sausages with a fork, lay them in the melted grease, keep moving them about, turning them frequently to prevent bursting; in ten or twelve minutes they will be sufficiently browned and cooked. Another sure way to prevent the cases from bursting is to cover them with cold water and let it come to the boiling point ; turn off the water and fry them. Sausages are nicely cooked by putting them in a baking-pan and browning them in the oven, turning them once or twice. In this

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