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178 SAUCES AND DRESSINGS-CATSUPS.

tnrough a sieve, and, when cold, bottle and cork closely. The corks

should be sealed.

MUSHROOM CATSUP.

USE the larger kind known as umbrellas or " flaps." They must be very fresh and not gathered in very wet weather, or the catsup will be less apt to keep. Wash and cut them in two to four pieces, and place them in a wide, flat jar or crock in layers, sprinkling each layer with salt, and let them stand for twenty-four hours; take them out and press out the juice, when bottle and cork; put the mushrooms back again, and in another twenty-four hours press them again ; battle and cork; repeat this for the third time, and then mix together all the juice extracted ; add to it pepper, allspice, one or more cloves accord- ing to quantity, pounded together ; boil the whole, and skim as long as any scum rises ; bottle when cool ; put in each bottle two cloves and a pepper-corn. Cork and seal, put in a dry place, and it will keep for

years.

GOOSEBERRY CATSUP.

TEN pounds of fruit gathered just before ripening, five pounds of sugar, one quart of vinegar, two tablespoonf uls each of ground black pepper, allspice and cinnamon. Boil the fruit in vinegar until reduced to a pulp, then add sugar and the other seasoning. Seal it hot.

Grape catsup is made in the same manner.

CUCUMBER CATSUP.

TAKE cucumbers suitable for the table ; peel and grate them, salt a little, and put in a bag to drain over night ; in the morning season to taste with salt, pepper and vinegar, put in small jars and seal tight for fall or winter use.

CURRANT CATSUP.

FOUB pounds of currants, two pounds of sugar, one pint of vinegar, one teaspoonful of cloves, a tablespoonful of cinnamon, pepper and allspice. Boil in a porcelain saucepan until thoroughly cooked. Strain through a sieve all but the skins; boil down until just thick enough to run freely from the mouth of a bottle when cold. Cork and

set aside.

APPLE CATSUP.

PEEL and quarter a dozen sound, tart apples ; stew them until soft in as little water as possible, then pass them through a sieve. To a

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