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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/245

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WOULD I WERE A CARELESS CHILD.

17.

And though some trifling share of praise,
To cheer my last declining days,
To me were doubly dear;
Whilst blessing your beloved name,
I'd waive at once a Poet's fame,
To prove a Prophet here.

1807.


I WOULD I WERE A CARELESS CHILD.[1]

1.

I would I were a careless child,
Still dwelling in my Highland cave,
Or roaming through the dusky wild,
Or bounding o'er the dark blue wave;
The cumbrous pomp of Saxon[2] pride,
Accords not with the freeborn soul,
Which loves the mountain's craggy side,
And seeks the rocks where billows roll.


    school. I should hardly have thought it possible for society (or the world, as it is called) to leave a being with so little of the leaven of bad passions. I do not speak from personal experience only, but from all I have ever heard of him from others, during absence and distance."—Detached Thoughts, Nov. 5, 1821; Life, p. 540.]

  1. Stanzas.—[Poems O. and T.]
  2. Sassenach, or Saxon, a Gaelic word, signifying either Lowland or English.