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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/281

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241
THE ADIEU.

Oh Fame! thou goddess of my heart;
On him who gains thy praise,
Pointless must fall the Spectre's dart,
Consumed in Glory's blaze;
But me she beckons from the earth,
My name obscure, unmark'd my birth,
My life a short and vulgar dream:
Lost in the dull, ignoble crowd,
My hopes recline within a shroud,
My fate is Lethe's stream.


10.

When I repose beneath the sod,
Unheeded in the clay,
Where once my playful footsteps trod,
Where now my head must lay,[1]
The meed of Pity will be shed
In dew-drops o'er my narrow bed,
By nightly skies, and storms alone;
No mortal eye will deign to steep
With tears the dark sepulchral deep
Which hides a name unknown.


11.

Forget this world, my restless sprite,

Turn, turn thy thoughts to Heaven;
  1. [See note to "Pignus Amoris," st. 3, l. 3, p. 232.]