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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/295

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FAREWELL TO THE MUSE.

3.

Though simple the themes of my rude flowing Lyre,
Yet even these themes are departed for ever;
No more beam the eyes which my dream could inspire,
My visions are flown, to return,—alas, never!


4.

When drain'd is the nectar which gladdens the bowl,
How vain is the effort delight to prolong!
When cold is the beauty which dwelt in my soul,[1]
What magic of Fancy can lengthen my song?


5.

Can the lips sing of Love in the desert alone,
Of kisses and smiles which they now must resign?
Or dwell with delight on the hours that are flown?
Ah, no! for those hours can no longer be mine.


6.

Can they speak of the friends that I lived but to love?[2]
Ah, surely Affection ennobles the strain!
But how can my numbers in sympathy move,
When I scarcely can hope to behold them again?


7.

Can I sing of the deeds which my Fathers have done,
And raise my loud harp to the fame of my Sires?
For glories like theirs, oh, how faint is my tone!
For Heroes' exploits how unequal my fires!


  1. When cold is the form.—[MS. Newstead.]
  2. —— whom I lived but to love.—[MS. Newstead.]