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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/303

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263
TO HARRIET.

3.

But Breeze of night again forbear,
In softest murmurs only sigh;
Let not a Zephyr's pinion dare
To lift those auburn locks on high.


4.

Chill is thy Breath, thou breeze of night!
Oh! ruffle not those lids of Snow;
For only Morning's cheering light
May wake the beam that lurks below.


5.

Blest be that lip and azure eye!
Sweet Fanny, hallowed be thy Sleep!
Those lips shall never vent a sigh,
Those eyes may never wake to weep.

February 23rd, 1808.


TO HARRIET.[1]

1.

Harriet! to see such Circumspection,[2]
In Ladies I have no objection

Concerning what they read;
  1. [From an autograph MS. at Newstead, now for the first time printed.]
  2. [See the poem "To Marion," and note, p. 129. It would seem that J. T. Becher addressed some flattering lines to Byron with reference to a poem concerning Harriet Maltby, possibly the lines "To Marion." The following note was