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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/311

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271
TO A YOUTHFUL FRIEND.

6.

Then tell me not, remind me not,[1]
Of hours which, though for ever gone,
Can still a pleasing dream restore,[2]
Till thou and I shall be forgot,
And senseless, as the mouldering stone
Which tells that we shall be no more.

Aug. 13, 1808. [First published, 1809.]


TO A YOUTHFUL FRIEND.[3]

1.

Few years have pass'd since thou and I
Were firmest friends, at least in name,
And Childhood's gay sincerity
Preserved our feelings long the same.[4]


  1. Remind me not, remind me not.—[MS. L.]
  2. Must still.—[MS. L.]
  3. To Sir W. D., on his using the expression, "Soyez constant en amitié."—[MS. L.]
  4. 'Twere well my friend if still with thee
    Through every scene of joy and woe,
    That thought could ever cherish'd be
    As warm as it was wont to glow.—[MS. L.]