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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/313

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273
TO A YOUTHFUL FRIEND.

6.

It boots not that, together bred,
Our childish days were days of joy:
My spring of life has quickly fled;
Thou, too, hast ceas'd to be a boy.


7.

And when we bid adieu to youth,
Slaves to the specious World's controul,
We sigh a long farewell to truth;
That World corrupts the noblest soul.


8.

Ah, joyous season! when the mind[1]
Dares all things boldly but to lie;
When Thought ere spoke is unconfin'd,
And sparkles in the placid eye.


9.

Not so in Man's maturer years,
When Man himself is but a tool;
When Interest sways our hopes and fears,
And all must love and hate by rule.


10.

With fools in kindred vice the same,[2]
We learn at length our faults to blend;
And those, and those alone, may claim
The prostituted name of friend.


  1. [Stanzas 8-9 are not in the MS.]
  2. Each fool whose vices are the same
    Whose faults with ours may blend.—[MS. L.]