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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/324

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282
HOURS OF IDLENESS.

TO A LADY,[1]

ON BEING ASKED MY REASON FOR QUITTING ENGLAND IN THE SPRING.[2]

1.

When Man, expell'd from Eden's bowers,
A moment linger'd near the gate,
Each scene recall'd the vanish'd hours,
And bade him curse his future fate.


2.

But, wandering on through distant climes,
He learnt to bear his load of grief;
Just gave a sigh to other times,
And found in busier scenes relief.


3.

Thus, Lady! will it be with me,[3]
And I must view thy charms no more;
For, while I linger near to thee,
I sigh for all I knew before.


  1. [Byron had written to his mother on November 2, 1808, announcing his intention of sailing for India in the following March. See Childe Harold, canto i. st. 3. See also Letter to Hodgson, Nov. 27, 1808.]
  2. The Farewell To a Lady.—[Imit. and Transl.]
  3. Thus Mary! (Mrs. Musters).— [MS.]