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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/504

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THE CURSE OF MINERVA.

Again the Ægean, heard no more afar,
Lulls his chafed breast from elemental war:50
Again his waves in milder tints unfold
Their long expanse of sapphire and of gold,
Mixed with the shades of many a distant isle
That frown, where gentler Ocean deigns to smile.[1]


As thus, within the walls of Pallas' fane,
I marked the beauties of the land and main,
Alone, and friendless, on the magic shore,
Whose arts and arms but live in poets' lore;
Oft as the matchless dome I turned to scan,
Sacred to Gods, but not secure from Man,60
The Past returned, the Present seemed to cease,
And Glory knew no clime beyond her Greece!


Hour rolled along, and Dian's orb on high
Had gained the centre of her softest sky;
And yet unwearied still my footsteps trod
O'er the vain shrine of many a vanished God:[2]
But chiefly, Pallas! thine, when Hecate's glare
Checked by thy columns, fell more sadly fair
O'er the chill marble, where the startling tread

Thrills the lone heart like echoes from the dead.70

    stability, and a simplicity of design peculiarly striking, are united with the highest elegance and accuracy of workmanship."—Travels in Albania, etc., by Lord Broughton (1858), i. 259.]

  1. —— seems to smile.—[Corsair, III. st. i. l. 54.]
  2. Sad shrine.—[MS.]