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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/531

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487
THE WALTZ.

Of kings the best—and last, not least in worth,
For graciously begetting George the Fourth.
To Germany, and Highnesses serene,
Who owe us millions—don't we owe the Queen?
To Germany, what owe we not besides?
So oft bestowing Brunswickers and brides;50
Who paid for vulgar, with her royal blood,
Drawn from the stem of each Teutonic stud:
Who sent us—so be pardoned all her faults—
A dozen dukes, some kings, a Queen—and Waltz.


But peace to her—her Emperor and Diet,
Though now transferred to Buonapartè's "fiat!"
Back to my theme—O muse of Motion! say,
How first to Albion found thy Waltz her way?


Borne on the breath of Hyperborean gales,
From Hamburg's port (while Hamburg yet had mails),
Ere yet unlucky Fame—compelled to creep61
To snowy Gottenburg—was chilled to sleep;
Or, starting from her slumbers, deigned arise,
Heligoland! to stock thy mart with lies;[1]
While unburnt Moscow[2] yet had news to send,

Nor owed her fiery Exit to a friend,
  1. To make Heligoland the mart for lies.—[MS. M.]
  2. The patriotic arson of our amiable allies cannot be sufficiently commended—nor subscribed for. Amongst other