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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/66

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26
HOURS OF IDLENESS.

The school where, loud warn'd by the bell, we resorted,
To pore o'er the precepts by Pedagogues taught.


4.

Again I behold where for hours I have ponder'd,
As reclining, at eve, on yon tombstone[1] I lay;
Or round the steep brow of the churchyard I wander'd,
To catch the last gleam of the sun's setting ray.


5.

I once more view the room, with spectators surrounded,
Where, as Zanga,[2] I trod on Alonzo o'erthrown;
While, to swell my young pride, such applauses resounded,
I fancied that Mossop[3] himself was outshone.


6.

Or, as Lear, I pour'd forth the deep imprecation,
By my daughters, of kingdom and reason depriv'd;
Till, fir'd by loud plaudits and self-adulation,
I regarded myself as a Garrick reviv'd.[4]


  1. [A tomb in the churchyard at Harrow was so well known to be his favourite resting-place, that the boys called it "Byron's Tomb:" and here, they say, he used to sit for hours, wrapt up in thought.—Life, p. 26.]
  2. [For the display of his declamatory powers, on the speech-days, he selected always the most vehement passages; such as the speech of Zanga over the body of Alonzo, and Lear's address to the storm.—Life, p. 20, note; and post, p. 103, var. i.]
  3. [Henry Mossop (1729-1773), a contemporary of Garrick, famous for his performance of "Zanga" in Young's tragedy of The Revenge.]
  4. I cofisider'd myself.—[4to]