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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/449

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415
ADDRESS AT THE CALEDONIAN MEETING.

5.[1]

One sigh of thy sorrow, one look of thy love,[2]
Shall turn me or fix, shall reward or reprove;
And the heartless may wonder at all I resign—
Thy lip shall reply, not to them, but to mine.

May 4, 1814.
[First published, Letters and Journals, 1830, i. 554.]


ADDRESS INTENDED TO BE RECITED AT THE CALEDONIAN MEETING.[3]

Who hath not glowed above the page where Fame
Hath fixed high Caledon's unconquered name;
The mountain-land which spurned the Roman chain,
And baffled back the fiery-crested Dane,
Whose bright claymore and hardihood of hand
No foe could tame—no tyrant could command?
That race is gone—but still their children breathe,
And Glory crowns them with redoubled wreath:
O'er Gael and Saxon mingling banners shine,
And, England! add their stubborn strength to thine.

  1. And thine is that love which I will not forego,
    Though the price which I pay be Eternity's woe.—[MS. erased.]
  2. One tear of thy sorrow, one smile ——.— [MS. erased.]
  3. [The "Caledonian Meeting," at which these lines were, or were intended to be, recited (see Life, p. 254), was a meeting of subscribers to the Highland Society, held annually in London, in support of the [Royal] Caledonian Asylum "for educating and supporting children of soldiers, sailors, and marines, natives of Scotland." "To soothe," says the compiler of the Report for 1814, p. 4, "by the assurance that their offspring will be reared in virtue and comfort, the minds of those brave men, through whose exposure to hardship and danger the independence of the Empire has been preserved, is no less an act of sound policy than of gratitude."]