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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 4.djvu/580

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POEMS 1816–1823.

SO WE'LL GO NO MORE A-ROVING.[1]

1.

So we'll go no more a-roving
So late into the night,
Though the heart be still as loving,
And the moon be still as bright.


2.

For the sword outwears its sheath,
And the soul wears out the breast,
And the heart must pause to breathe,
And Love itself have rest.


3.

Though the night was made for loving,
And the day returns too soon,
Yet we'll go no more a-roving
By the light of the moon.

Feb. 28, 1817.
[First published, Letters and Journals, 1830, ii. 79.]


[LORD BYRON'S VERSES ON SAM ROGERS.][2]

QUESTION.

Nose and Chin that make a knocker,[3]

Wrinkles that would puzzle Cocker;
  1. ["The mumming closed with a masked ball at the Fenice, where I went, as also to most of the ridottos, etc., etc.; and, though I did not dissipate much upon the whole, yet I find 'the sword wearing out the scabbard,' though I have but just turned the corner of twenty-nine."—Letter to Moore, February 28, 1817. The verses form part of the letter. (See Letters, 1900, iv. 59, 60.)]
  2. [Lady Blessington told Crabb Robinson (Diary, 1869, iii. 17) that the publication of the Question and Answer would "kill Rogers." The
  3. —— would shame a knocker.—[Fraser's Magazine, 1833.]