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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 4.djvu/90

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60
POEMS OF JULY—SEPTEMBER, 1816.

And, above all, a Lake I can behold
Lovelier, not dearer, than our own of old.[1]


IX.

Oh that thou wert but with me!—but I grow
The fool of my own wishes, and forget
The solitude which I have vaunted so
Has lost its praise in this but one regret;
There may be others which I less may show;—
I am not of the plaintive mood, and yet
I feel an ebb in my philosophy,
And the tide rising in my altered eye.[2]


X.

I did remind thee of our own dear Lake,
By the old Hall which may be mine no more.
Leman's is fair; but think not I forsake
The sweet remembrance of a dearer shore:
Sad havoc Time must with my memory make,
Ere that or thou can fade these eyes before;
Though, like all things which I have loved, they are
Resigned for ever, or divided far.


XI.

The world is all before me; I but ask
Of Nature that with which she will comply—
It is but in her Summer's sun to bask,
To mingle with the quiet of her sky,
To see her gentle face without a mask,
And never gaze on it with apathy.
She was my early friend, and now shall be
My sister—till I look again on thee.


XII.

I can reduce all feelings but this one;

And that I would not;—for at length I see
  1. [For a description of the lake at Newstead, see Dan Juan, Canto XIII. stanza lvii.]
  2. And think of such things with a childish eye.—[MS.]