Open main menu

Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 7.djvu/108

This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
74
JEUX D'ESPRIT AND MINOR POEMS, 1798-1824.

MARTIAL, Lib. I. Epig. I.

"Hic est, quem legis, ille, quem requiris,
Toto notus in orbe Martialis," etc.

He, unto whom thou art so partial,
Oh, reader! is the well-known Martial,
The Epigrammatist: while living,
Give him the fame thou would'st be giving;
So shall he hear, and feel, and know it—
Post-obits rarely reach a poet.

[N.D.? 1821.]
[First published, Lord Byron's Works, 1833, xvii. 245.]


BOWLES AND CAMPBELL.

To the air of "How now, Madam Flirt," in the Beggar's Opera.[1]

Bowles.

"Why, how now, saucy Tom?

If you thus must ramble,
  1. [Compare the Beggar's Opera, act ii. sc. 2— {{block center|

    Air, "Good morrow, Gossip Joan."

    "Polly. Why, how now, Madam Flirt?
    If you thus must chatter,