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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 7.djvu/44

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16
JEUX D'ESPRIT AND MINOR POEMS, 1798-1824.


Why did I hold thy love so dear?
Why shed for such a heart one tear?
Let deep and dreary silence be
My only memory of thee!


2.

When all are fled who flatter now,
Save thoughts which will not flatter then;
And thou recall'st the broken vow
To him who must not love again—
Each hour of now forgotten years
Thou, then, shalt number with thy tears;
And every drop of grief shall be
A vain remembrancer of me!

Undated, ?1812.
[From an autograph MS. in the possession of Mr. Murray,
now for the first time printed.]


TO THOMAS MOORE.

WRITTEN THE EVENING BEFORE HIS VISIT TO MR. LEIGH HUNT IN HORSEMONGER LANE GAOL, MAY 19, 1813.

Oh you, who in all names can tickle the town,
Anacreon, Tom Little, Tom Moore, or Tom Brown,—[1]
For hang me if I know of which you may most brag,
Your Quarto two-pounds, or your Two-penny Post Bag;

******

But now to my letter—to yours 't is an answer—
To-morrow be with me, as soon as you can, sir,

  1. [Moore's "Intercepted Letters; or, The Twopenny Post-Bag, By Thomas Brown, the Younger," was published in 1813.]