Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 104 Part 6.djvu/929

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PROCLAMATION 6153—JUNE 29, 1990 104 STAT. 5319 (c) effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after April 1, 1990: (1) U.S. note 8 to subchapter II of chapter 99 is modified by striking out references to headings "9902.29.09". "9902.29.89". "9902.29.90", "9902.29.98", "9902.30.03", and "9902.30.06". (2) HTS heading 9902.29.12 is deleted. (3) HTS heading 9902.29.50 is modified by striking out "2941.90.50," from the article description. (d) effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after May 16, 1990, U.S. note 5 to subchapter III of chapter 99 is modified by inserting "subheading 9903.23.18," after "9903.23.14,". (e) effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after July 1, 1990, HTS heading 9902.29.86 is modified by striking out "2935.00.46" from the article description and by inserting "2935.00.50" in lieu thereof. Proclamation 6153 of June 29, 1990 National Literacy Day, 1990 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our future depends on education, and education begins with literacy. Millions of Americans are not sufficiently literate to function fully in our society from day to day. These individuals can be found not only in prisons and juvenile court, and on welfare and unemployment lines, but also on the job and at the heads of families—trying their best but lacking the skills they need to realize their greatest dreams for themselves and for their children. Many American students are at risk because their families cannot support their efforts to learn. At risk, too, are the United States' strength and productivity. Because literacy is essential for workers to gain the knowledge and skills their jobs require, it is essential to keeping American business and industry competitive. If the United States is to remain a free, strong, and prosperous country, and a force for good in the world, we must cultivate the talent and potential of all our people—in the work place, in our families, and in our communities. Indeed, that is why we have included improved literacy among our national education goals. My Administration and the Nation's Governors are working hard to ensure that, by the year 2000, every adult American will be literate and possess the knowledge and skills necessary to compete in a global economy. Joining their Federal, State, and local governments in efforts to promote literacy are thousands of professional educators, volunteers, business and community leaders, religious organizations, and labor associations. By providing tutoring, job training, and other educational opportunities, these concerned men and women are helping undereducated Americans to discover the unlimited rewards of literacy and learning. It is fitting that we set aside a day to salute them—and their students—for their dedication and hard work. In so doing, let us also note that each of us has a stake in building a more literate America. To focus attention on the importance of literacy, the Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 320, has designated July 2, 1990, as "National 39-194O-91-30:QL3Part6