Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 109 Part 1.djvu/414

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109 STAT. 398 PUBLIC LAW 104-45—NOV. 8, 1995 Public Law 104-45 104th Congress Nov. 8, 1995 [S. 1322] Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995. Foreign relations. An Act To provide for the relocation of the United States Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the "Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995". SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress makes the following findings: (1) Each sovereign nation, under international law and custom, may designate its own capital. (2) Since 1950, the city of Jerusalem has been the capital of the State of Israel. (3) The city of Jerusalem is the seat of Israel's President, Parliament, and Supreme Court, and the site of numerous government ministries and social and cultural institutions. (4) The city of Jerusalem is the spiritual center of Judaism, and is also considered a holy city by the members of other religious faiths. (5) From 1948-1967, Jerusalem was a divided city and Israeli citizens of all faiths as well as Jewish citizens of all states were denied access to holy sites in the area controlled by Jordan. (6) In 1967, the city of Jerusalem was reunited during the conflict known as the Six Day War. (7) Since 1967, Jerusalem has been a united city administered by Israel, and persons of all religious faiths have been guaranteed full access to holy sites within the city. (8) This year marks the 28th consecutive year that Jerusalem has been administered as a unified city in which the rights of all faiths have been respected and protected. (9) In 1990, the Congress unanimously adopted Senate Concurrent Resolution 106, which declares that the Congress "strongly believes that Jerusalem must remain an undivided city in which the rights of every ethnic and religious group are protected". (10) In 1992, the United States Senate and House of Representatives unanimously adopted Senate Concurrent Resolution 113 of the One Hundred Second Congress to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem, and reaffirming congressional sentiment that Jerusalem must remain an undivided city.