Pictures of life in Mexico/Volume 1

 
 

PICTURES

 

of

 

LIFE IN MEXICO.

 

By R. H. MASON.

 

With Etchings by the Author

 

in two volumes

 

VOL. I.

 

LONDON

SMITH, ELDER AND CO., 65, CORNHILL.

 

 

1852.

page

TO

 

S. C. HALL, Esq., F.S.A.,

 

This Work

 

IS DEDICATED:

A TRIBUTE OF THE AUTHOR'S HIGH ESTEEM AND ADMIRATION

page

 

PREFACE.

 

 

The Author visited Mexico in 1848-9, and was in a position to gather a variety of facts relating to the people and country, in different departments, which he believes have not been hitherto published. Whatever may be their value, the reader may rely upon the information contained in these volumes being the result of personal observation and diligent inquiry, with great care bestowed to make it as accurate as possible.

The scenes or "Pictures of Life in Mexico" have been interspersed with characteristic stories and anecdotes, with a view of presenting the habits and manners of the people more vividly than any mere description could have done. These narratives are not only founded on fact, but have, for the most part, really occurred in the Author's experiences; and he has endeavoured to imitate the style in which they would be related by Mexicans. For the information given, he alone is accountable; no contemporary statements having been referred to: except those relating to statistics, which are compiled from the best and most recent authorities, and are added to make the work more complete.

In order to form an idea of the whole country, the Author visited wild and remote districts, as well as populous cities, for the purpose of observing life of many shades and colours; and the following pages embrace scenes in the capital and in obscure hamlets, in prairies and mountains, and in habitations—not only of the wealthy and prosperous—but also in Indian huts: in short, to picture life and character among priests and léperos, hunters and miners, farmers and Indians, carriers and city authorities, has been the aim of the Author.

Should these pages have the good fortune to amuse the English reader by exhibiting life and manners so different from those of his own country, and to awaken some interest in the condition of Mexico—and thus tend towards its amelioration—the object of the Author will have been fully gained.

Albert Villa, Harrow,
December
1, 1851.