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By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Our Nation's current electoral process is both testimony and example of the power of free men and women to govern themselves. Our forebears, drawing from a faith in the people rooted in a firm faith in God, launched this grand experiment in responsible self-government. In the days ahead, no matter what our individual political convictions, we can all be grateful for the honor and integrity of this noble process.

Without trying to impose our will on other nations, let us continue to hold high the torch of liberty and democracy that has illumined our land. Laying aside arrogance and false pride, let us continue to urge self-determination and human rights as the best way for peoples everywhere to realize their own full destiny.

Let us pray that freedom, in all its manifestations, may be the reality of the present and the wave of the future. Let us pray that people everywhere will be free-free even to make their own mistakes as they struggle to build a life of material security and spiritual satisfaction.

As we pray, let us never forget the American citizens in Iran who remain hostages in fundamental violation of the teachings of the world's religions. Let us also pray that harmony and stability will come to the people of Iran, leading both to the safe return of our brothers and sisters and to a better life for all in that troubled land.

Recognizing our need for prayer, the Congress, by Joint Resolution, approved April 17, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 169h; 66 Stat. 64), has called upon the President to set aside a suitable day each year as a National Day of Prayer.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, JIMMY CARTER, President of the United States of America do hereby proclaim Monday, October 6, 1980, as a National Day of Prayer. I further ask that all who so desire make this a Day of Fast as well. On that day, I ask Americans to join me in thanksgiving to God for His blessings and in earnest prayer to Him for His protection in the year ahead. Finally, may He grant freedom to all unjustly held captive, and may He grant us His vision of a world at peace.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.

JIMMY CARTER

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 11:52 a.m., September 22, 1980]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).