The African Slave Trade



The African Slave Trade  (1880) 
by Rufus Wheelwright Clark

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CONTENTS
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CHAPTER I.
THE QUESTION AT ISSUE.
We are called to discuss the Slave Trade anew — The contest between Freedom and Slavery — Responsibility for the progress of the latter — Jefferson's view of God's justice — Many indeed discard the "higher law" views of Patrick Henry — Gouverneur Morris — John Jay — Washington — The American Revolution a Contest for Natural Rights — Views of Hamilton, Lafayette, and Washington — the Constitutional Convention — Modern Degeneracy — The Slave Trade and Slavery alike in principle — Testimony of the Presbyterian General Assemby — Alarming aspect of this degeneracy, 7
CHAPTER II.
HISTORY OF THE SLAVE TRADE.
Dates from 1503 — Portuguese, French, and English First importation into America in 1620 — Waste of Life — The "Middle Passage" — Statistics — Disclosures elicited by the British Parliament — A Slave ship described — The ship" Zoreg" — Horrors of the trade can not be written, 19
CHAPTER III.
EFFECTS OF THE SLAVE TRADE UPON AFRICA.
Barrier to Social and Moral Improvement — Condition of Africa in the 12th and 16th centuries — In 1700 — In 1726 – In 1819Changes in the same District under the Effects of the Traffic Cruelties of Native Chiefs — Bloody Customs — These due, in great part, to the Slave Trade – Slavery in Africa compared with that in America (Note) — Blood crying from the Ground, 32
CHAPTER IV.
EFFORTS TO ABOLISH THE SLAVE TRADE.
First Advocate — The "Friend" – Yearly Meetings in 1696, 1727, and 1760 — First act of Voluntary Emancipation — Goodwyn — Baxter — Whitefield — Wesley — Thomas Clarkson — Early History — Premium Essay on the Slave Trade — Obtains the Prize — Devotes himself to the Cause for life — His Supporters — Sacrifices — Joined by Wilberforce — Committee of Twelve — Granville Sharp — Efforts to secure the action of Parliament — Opposition — Resolution in 1808 — Passage of the Bill to abolish the Traffic — First Movements in the United States — Laws of 1794 and 1800 — Importation of Slaves prohibited in 1808 — The Traffic declared Piracy in 1820 — Opinions of Memorialists and Eminent Citizens — Abolition of the Traffic by European Governments — Noble Conduct of Great Britain, 43
CHAPTER V.
FAILURE OF MEASURES TO DESTROY
THE SLAVE TRADE.
The Traffic still continued — Increased cruelties of it — Complicity of our own country — Refusal to join with |England and France in its suppression — Conduct of Mexico in Contrast — Causes of the Failure in this Country — The Slave Trade a legitimate Product of Slavery — Annexation of Texas — War with Mexico — Feeling in England in Relation to our Conduct 69
CHAPTER VI.
EVIDENCES OF THE REVIVAL OF THE SLAVE TRADE
IN THE UNITED STATES.
The South not unanimous in favor of such revival — Need of support to those who oppose it — The magnitude of the evil no safeguard against it — Difficult to obtain Evidence of its present Extent — Statistics of the Trade — The yacht "Wanderer" — The "Echo" — Other instances — Advertisement of newly imported slaves for sale — Statement of a United States Senator — Statements of Southern Papers — Southern Politicians — Public Meetings — Protest of Grand Jury against the outlawry of the Traffic — Opinions of Eminent Statesmen — Hon. H. W. Davis — Resolutions of Legislature of New York, 84
CHAPTER VII.
CONCLUSION.
Effects of Reopening the Traffic — Upon the Secular Interests of the Country — Upon its Religious Interest — Appeal to the Nation — Responsibility upon the Churches 97


This work was published before January 1, 1927, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.