The Looking-Glass (Peterson)

For works with similar titles, see The Looking-Glass.
The Looking-Glass  (1854) 
by Daniel H. Peterson
The Looking-Glass - Peterson (1854) - figure 008.png

A Lady teaching her little brother and the Author, prior to the latter redeeming his mother, who remains with the lady. The author goes to his new home, carrying with him obedience, truth, honesty, willing at all times to receive good instruction, by which means he was treated as one of the family, and wanted for nothing.

THE

LOOKING-GLASS:

BEING

A TRUE REPORT AND NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE,
TRAVELS, AND LABORS

OF THE

REV. DANIEL H. PETERSON,

a colored clergyman;

Embracing a period of time from the year 1812 to 1854,

and including

HIS VISIT TO WESTERN AFRICA.


with engravings.


NEW YORK:

WRIGHT, PRINTER, 146 FULTON STREET.


1854.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1854,

By Rev. Daniel H. Peterson,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the

Southern District of New-York.


PREFACE


The author of this work has for a long time, been greatly concerned for this land and nation, and for the human family in general; but, more particularly, for the unfortunate African, both in this and every other part of the world which he has seen or read of. The Author desires, and his prayer is, that tranquillity, peace, and happiness may cover the earth, as the waters cover the great deep.

Forasmuch as there has been a great deal of confusion in relation to my afflicted nation, and different parties holding opposite opinions have come forward with a design to alleviate their condition, which good intentions have all failed, therefore I have made it a matter of prayer, if peradventure I might be enlightened with respect to the best plan for the relief of the colored people. I now feel that I am able to answer this great question in full.

First, It is necessary to become Christians, to love and fear God, and keep his commandments, to have patience, and faith in our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ: then we shall be delivered in due time. Secondly, the reader is referred to the pages of this work. Please read it impartially and carefully. You will see plainly that the Author's sole aim is to promote the happiness of the human family here and hereafter. Therefore, I pray that those who will read this book may be forever blessed in this world, and receive endless happiness in the world to come.

D. H. PETERSON.

New York, May, 1854.

CONTENTS.


CHAPTER I.
The Author purchases his Mother's freedom. An excellent young lady. He goes to Baltimore. Early religious impressions. He goes to Philadelphia and becomes united to the Church. Is Steward on the Delaware. Remarkable vision. His ministry
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.13
CHAPTER II.
The Cholera in Philadelphia. The Author is concerned for the poor and afflicted; he visits them. Good fruits of Gospel labor. Pride and vanity in the Bethel Church. Desecration of the old Church. Pulling down the old building. Fatal accident. Misconduct of the Church authorities. An Epistle from D. H. Peterson, warning the Church to take heed of their ways, and admonishing all men to lead a just and holy life on the earth, that they may partake of a heavenly reward hereafter. The Author enters the great Gospel field; leaves Philadelphia, and travels in the Ministry
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.30
CHAPTER III.
The Author addresses his brethren in bondage. A door is open for the relief of the people of color. Bethel Church of Philadelphia is reproved for her folly and pride. A great blunder at the Conference in Buffalo. Oppression and persecution. Church in Sixth street, Philadelphia, and her minister. No facilities in the United States for educated colored men. Slavery of the Africans was permitted on account of their rebellion and idolatry. Brilliant prospects for the colored man in Liberia. The Author exhorts his colored brethren to reflect seriously, and choose that good part which will not be taken from them
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.49
CHAPTER IV.
Good treatment on board the Isla de Cuba. Departure for Liberia. Worship on board every Sabbath. Much sea-sickness. Kind attentions of Capt. Miller. Warm weather on the Coast of Africa. Unsuccessful attempts to take a turtle. Serious accident to the mate, Mr. Hatch. They catch a shark, and cook him for dinner. Description of Cape Mount. A beautiful fish. Visit from a little bird. Visits from the natives on the Coast. Arrival at Monrovia. Mr. Cauldwell goes on shore
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.76
CHAPTER V.
The Author goes on shore. Kind reception. Visits the President, Judge, and other distinguished persons. Beauty of the country. Description of the town, the soil, and the inhabitants. Good opportunities in Liberia for emigrants. Mechanics, farmers and schoolmasters wanted in Liberia. Those who lay the foundations of this great nation should be moral, industrious, economical, and religious persons. With the aid of friends in the United States, the cause of colored emigration to Liberia cannot fail to prosper
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.94


CHAPTER VI.
The Author visits several places in the vicinity of Monrovia. He speaks a number of times in the Churches. He sails for Sierra Leone. On the passage Mr. Caldwell is very sick, and the Steward tries to get possession of his property. The Author opposes this nefarious attempt. They arrive in Sierra Leone. The Author finishes his business and sails for Gambia. Arrival in Gambia. Mahometans; Idolators; treatment of criminals under the British rule. The Author prefers the United States Government. He sails in the Isla de Cuba for the United States. Storms at sea. The Author trusts in the Lord. Two men concealed on board. The Gulf Stream. Arrival at New-York
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.102
CHAPTER VII.
The Author relates part of a conversation with an English officer. Some description of Gambia and its inhabitants. Necessity of cultivation. The minds of the natives must be cultivated as well as the land. Fine opportunities in Africa for steamboats, and enterprising men generally. Cape Mount. No newspaper in Liberia. An excellent opening for Frederick Douglass. Address to the rulers of Liberia. The necessity of treating the natives well and respecting their rights. Duties of parents and teachers. The young should be instructed. Mr. Horne in Monrovia. Mrs. Ann Wilkins. Mr. Phillips, a colored teacher. The Rev. Samuel Williams and family, formerly of Pennsylvania
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.117


CONCLUDING REMARKS. Certificates, including one by His Excellency J. J. Roberts, President of Liberia, Western Africa. Notice of the Return of the barque Isla de Cuba. Resolutions adopted by the Passengers highly complimentary to Capt. Miller, on approaching the Coast of Africa
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.133
Church Collections—On the mode of making them
.     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
p.150