The military and civil history of Connecticut during the war of 1861-65

The military and civil history of Connecticut during the war of 1861-65  (1868) 
by William Augustus Croffut; John Moses Morris
The military and civil history of Connecticut during the war of 1861-65 - comprising a detailed account of the various regiments and batteries, through march, encampment, bivouac (IA 00359433.3197.emory.edu).pdf

(Upload an image to replace this placeholder.)

THE

MILITARY AND CIVIL HISTORY

OF

CONNECTICUT

DURING

THE WAR OF 1861-65.

COMPRISING . DETAILED ACCOUNT OF

THE VARIOUS REGIMENTS AND BATTERIES,

TIIROUGH JIAIRCII, INCLUDENT, LIGUAG, AND BATTLE; ALSO INSTANCES OF DISTINGUISHED I'LTSOYAL GALLANTRY, AST) BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF MANY HEROIC SOLDIERS: TOGETHER WITH A RECORD OF THE PATRIOTIC ACTION OF CITIZENS AT HOME, AND OF THE LIDERAL SUPPORT FURNISHED BY THE STATE IN IT'S EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE DETARTDIENTS.

BY

W. A. CROFFUT AND JOHN M. MORRIS.

ILLUSTRATED.

NEW YORK:

PUBLISHED BY LED YARD BILL.

1868.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by

LEDYARD BILL,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.

Geo. C. Rand & Avery, Stereotypers and Printers, Boston

To John Turner Wait,

LATE SPEAKER

OF THE CONNECTICUT HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES;

A Patriot

WHOSE ONLY SON FELL IN DEFENSE OF HIS COUNTRY, AND WHOSE MANY ACTS OF KINDNESS HAVE ENDEARED HIM TO THE SOLDIERS OF CONNECTICUT; THE RECORD OF THEIR SERVICES AND SUFFERINGS,

IS CORDIALLY DEDICATED.

PREFACE.


The History of Copuecticut during the late civil war was announced by Chaplain John M. Morris more than two years ago, and was promised to the Publisher more than a year ago; but the difficulty of obtaining precise information was rastly greater than had been anticipated, while many im- perative duties of the projector consumed much coveted time. To prevent further delay, an arrangement was made whereby V A. Croffut became associated in the labor. The book has been mainly written by Mr. Croffut, from materials carefully collected by Mr. Morris. It is proper to bear testimouy, here, to the patient persistence, State pride, nnd devotedness to the cause, which have been exhibited by the Publisher, in overcoming the obsta- cles tliat so long postponed a completion of the volume. This work aims to gire a fair, accurate, and reasonably complete narrative of the scrriccs of the soldiers of Connecticut in the field, with a briefer record of the patriotic support furnished by citizens at home. It presents 10 scicutiſic discussion of strategy, and 10 profound reflections on the causes and results of the war for the Upion.

We offer no claborate description of battles, except at the points where the regiments of our State were involved: but troops fought under the tri- viued flag in crery rebellious State, and in almost erery important cugage- ment; so that we rise from our work to find that the story of the soldiers of Connecticut, preseats, with singular completeness, the story of thic war. This general outline is rendered more palpable by the fact, that, instead of following the plau of giving cach regimental record complete in itself, and detaclied from all the rest, we have rather tried to group events that are synchronous, and carry forward the whole with something of the con- secutive method of history.

It is impossible to estimate, even approximately, the number of men, much more tlic aggregate of power and character, which Connecticut con- tributed to the war. On every great battle-field her sons and grandsons lie. In the regiments of every State they bore muskets and held commis- sions. Tu erery pivotal lour of the war, leaders appeared among tlıc fore- most, wlio went back to her sterile but man-nourishing soil for clements of strength, skill, and valor. Not only Winthrop, Ellswortlı, Lyon, Foote, Sedgwick, Mansfield, Wadsworth, McClellan, Mower, Wright, Turry, but William Tecumseh Sherman and Ulysses S. Grant, sprang straiglt from the loius of our sturdy little Commonwealth.

"The soldiers fight, and the kings are heroes," says a quaint proverb of the Talmud. It were an easy task to enumerate the illustrious officers, who were lifted up in the gaze of all the world; but there is a sense of pair and profound sorrow in the consciousness that it is impossible to render justice to the nameless rank and file who never wore even a corporal's chorron, but held to their duty with sublime patience. The last of the color-guard, who seized the standard that had dropped from the relaxed grasp of his comrades, and bore it on, and planted it and stood by it on the edge of the rebel rific-pit ; the martyr wlio perished in prison, and ever since has been marked "missing" upon the roll of regimental casualties; the thousand glorious obscure, who were mown down by the flaming blade of battle, and died singing songs of triumph, and praying for the cstablish- ment of Liberty and Law, - these are the true heroes and martyrs of all the wars of the world. But, in a book of limited scope, we have no alternative but to mention the officer as the nnit standing for his command.

Connecticut sent to the struggle fifty thousand soldiers in her own regiments, and probably half as many more in the regiments of other States. A simple catalogue of their names and muster would fill two books as large as this; while a complete chronicle of the service of all her faithful sons would require a volume for each. Yet we have striven to record every act of conspicuous gallantry or merit that has come to our knowledge, without regard to rank, feeling rather that rare devotedness was nobler in the untitled hero, who had little incentive of military ambition, and little hope that his deed would ever be marked or mentioned.

In treating of affairs at home, we have kept strictly to what liad a direct bearing on the war; and, in touching upon local politics, we have written in the spirit of fairness.

In presenting the statistics of patriotic benevolence we confess to a dis- appointment. No people beset by war crer gare, of their own frce will, so lavishly as onrs; and we hoped to compile a record of this liberality, so specific and so remarkable, as to amaze the dwellers in this peaceful land when our villages sliall have become cities, and our farms suburban gardevs. But we find tliat our towns, societies, and churches kept, in most iustances, no systematic record whatever. The meager facts submitted will probably be received as possessing a certain interest and value.

It is also proper to say that the portraits which appear in this volume have been selected with regard not only to the merits of the subjects, bat also to the desirableness of representing different regiments, erery rapk, and all sections of the State.

Instead of relying upon some officer of each regiment to write the history of its service, we have preferred to have the whole book grow up under our own hand; and to this end we have gathered facts with diligence and care from official reports, diaries, scrap-books, newspapers, private letters, personal interviews, and every available source, seeking corroboration as far as practicable. By this, we have incurred an evormous labor; but we have secured absolue impartiality, and have attained, we trust, substantial accuracy, cren in the multiplicity of detail and circumstance. Many gentlemen have placed at our disposal sketches, letters, documents, and valuable material. Our acknowledgments are duly expressed in these pages. There are a few to whom we feel peculiarly indebted. – Col. Philo B. Buckingham; Capt. T. F. Vaill of the Second Artillery: Lieut.-Col. William S. Cogswell of the Fifth ; Chaplain H. S. DeForest of the Eler-enth; Capt. II. P. Goddard of the Fourteenth ; Capt. Ilenry G. Marshall and Enoch E. Rogers of the Fifteenth; Chaplain V C. Walker of the Eighteenth ; Capt. Luther G. Riggs of the Twenty-second ; Lieut.-Col. David Torrance of the Tweuty-ninth ; Licut. J. H. Lord of the Second (three-months' troops); and Johu M. Douglass, Esq., for an admirably- written chronicle of the part borne by the citizens of Middletown.

It is hoped that no critic will be so nujnst as to compare this volume with the vast and eloquent unwritten history of the war. Kcenly will the friends of many noble men feel that we have failed to portray the self-deny- ing lives and valiant deeds of their heroes; but they can not more than we do. Bany, even of tlie worthy, are numeless here ; for tlieir story has never been told us, and is unrecorded. The whole can not be written. Our facts and incidents are ouly illustrative, not exhaustive. They may not always be the most noteworthy; but they are the best at our command. It is hoped that some compensation for any omissions of this kind may be found in the fact that we have maintained the local character of the work by introducing as much personal incident as conld be added without burdening the narrative. Few books arc ever published that are so full of individual achievement and experience.

We present this volume, however, with confidence, because we feel, that, whatever may be its defects of coustruction, much will be preserved in it which would otherwise be lost, and mncli brought to the notice of the whole State, wbich has liitherto becn known to few outside of town or neighborhood. It may tend to moderate the extravagant estimate which local partiality sometimes places on individuals ; but it can hardly fail to exalt the general impression of the average patriotism and efficicucy.

Deeds of daring and devotion now ennoble the records of every town, A filial gathering of these seeds of history should have a present value in nourishing State pride and stimulating a generous public spirit. And it can not but be prized as a record of ancestral sacrifice by the generations to come, when grandchildren shall cluster around the chair of thic gray-haired volunteer, and listen while he tells once more low he carried the fag at Gettysburg, and when the venerable dame shall resort to the old bureau fragrant with memories, and gaze again through the mists at the blue coat worn by one who went to battle with her blessing, and died joy.

fully that the Republic might have a second birth.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE
Early History of Connecticut.—The Pequot War.—First American Constitution.—Heavy Taxation.—Courage of the New-Haven Colony,—Character of the Civil Government.—The King's Officers resisted.—The Charter preserved. Connecticut Declaration of Independence.—Putnam at Boston.—The Statue at Litchfield.—Brother Jonathan.—Connecticut Men capture the first British Flags in 1812.—The Blue-Laws.—Comparison with other colonies.—Pre-eminence in Mechanics.—First Steamboat, Railroad, and Telegraph.—Influence on other States
13

CHAPTER II.

The War began at the Ballot-Box. - Elections in Connecticut in 1860. - Attitude of Parties. - Secession becomes Formidable. - Discussion and Recrimination. - Our Representatives in Congress. — Their Action on Peace Propositions. - Foresight of Gov. Buckingham. - The Pence Conference. - Hon. Isaac Toucey.-Spring Election of 1861, - Connecticut declares for Coercion
29

CHAPTER II.

The Fall of Sumter. - Enthusiasm in Connecticut. - Coercion " accepted as a Duty:-A Battle-Suoday: -- Winsted and New Britain. - Sympathy for the South. - The Call for the First Regiment. - Condition of our Militia. - The Massachusetts Sixth. - The Towns moving: - The Hartford Companies, – ſeriden, New Haven, Danbury, Middletown, Norwich, Derby, Willimantic, Mystic, Putnam, Danielsonville, Bridgeport, Waterbury, New Londou, Litchfield, Walliugford, Farmington, Salisbury. - The Old Flag
88

CHAPTER IV.

The Volunteers uniformed and equipped. - Response of Wealthy Men and Institutions. Patriotic Work of the Women. - Another Revolutionary Sunday. - Call for Second and Third Regiments. - The Troops at Rendezvous. Outfit completed. - In Camp. - Rations and Beds. - Contributions flow in. - Drill and Discipline. -Sage Advice.– Departure of the Three Regiments
56

CHAPTER V.

Capt. Dan Tyler. - Henry B. Norton.- Cassius M. Clay, Guard - The Fourth Regiment.-Towns represented. -Departure.- Colt's Revolving Rifles. - It becomes the Fifth Connecticut. - Towos represented. - Home Guard. — Yale College. - The General Assembly. - Message of the Governor. - War Legislation. The Constitutional Amendment. Great Unanimity of Feeling. - Independence Day
70

CHAPTER VI.

The First and Second Regiments in Washington. - Welcoine Reception.- Camp at Glenwood. - Joined by tlie Third. - Death of Col. Ellsworth. - Ellsworth of Connecticut Stock. -"Invasion" of Virginia.- Ambush at Vienna. - Holding the Advanced Post. Death of T Winthrop.-- Sketch of his Life and Character. - Death of Capt. James H. Ward. An Advance. - Blackburn's Ford. Bu!! Rur.-Gen. Tyler begins the Battle. - The Army betrayed. - Behavior of Connecticut Troops. - Tbe Last on the field. They act as Rear-Guard in the Retreat. - Good Order maintained. They bring off Public Property. - Home, and Muster-out
88

CHAPTER VII.

PAGE
The Effect of the Defeat at Bull Run.- Second Uprising. The Fifth Regiment goes to Harper's Ferry.—Six Regiments begun. - A Squadron of Cavnlry.- Peace-Flags and Peace-Meetings. - Seymour's Resolutions. - Concurrent Action:- Goshen, Bloomfield, Darien, Easton, Cornwall, Sharon, Prospect, North Guilford, Stonington. - A New Saybrook Platform.- New Fairfield. - The Bridgeport Farmer. - How Stepney stopped the War.— The Farmer Office sacked. — Gov, Buckingham's Proclamation. - Life and Character of Gen. Lyon. — His Bravery und Decision. — His Leroic Death
101

CHAPTER VIII.

The Fourth in Maryland. -Dissatisfaction and Insubordination. The Fifth on the Potomac. - Recruiting active. - 'The Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth. - Towns represented. Departure: - Sixth and Seventh at Washington and Annapolis. --- Eighth on Long "All Full Companics" accepted. - The Tenth. --Towns represented. -- Fighth and Tenth at Annapolis. – Meetings and Social Intercourse. - The Eleventh. -- Recruiting. Towns represented. - The Regiment embarks for Annapolis. - Port-Royal Expedition.- Landing of the Sixth and Seventh. - First Union Troops in South Carolina. -Tyler appointed Colonel of the Fourth. — The New Discipline. ---Exposure and Privations of the Fifth
117

CHAPTER IX.

Extra Session of the Legislature. - Governor's Message. - A Carte Blancho. - More Regiments authorized. - Gen. Butler and the Twelfth. - A Light Battery and a Battalion of Cavalry.---At Meriden. -- O& for the War. - The Ninth badly equipped. - Twelfth in Camp at Hartford. - Thirteenth in Barracks at New Haven. -Ninth and Twelfth at Ship Island. - Blockading. The “Stone Fleet." - Effect on the Harbors of the South
133

CHAPTER X.

Patriotic Benevolence. - The Regiments in the field supplied. - Sewing and Knitting. -Thanksgiving Day.-Soldiers-aid Societies.-Systematic Effort. - Alfred Walker. - Thirteenth at New Haven. - A " Dandy Regiment." - Off for Ship Island. - The Ninth. - Dasb at Biloxi and Pass Christian. - Victory.— Trophies and Thanks of Gen. Butler.- Capture of New Orleans .
148

CHAPTER XI.

The Eighth, Tenth, and Eleventh leave Apnapolis. - Storm off Hatteras. - Suffering and Depression. - Battle and Capture of Roanoke Island. - Death of Col. Charles L. Russell. - Another Movement. - Battle of Newberne. - Death of Col. A. W. Drake. -Incidents. - Siege of Fort Macon
162

CHAPTER XII.

The Connecticut Chaplains'-aid Commission. -Chapel Tents and Regimental Libraries furnished. - Medical Examining Board. - Spring Election of 1862. - The War Spirit predominant. - Governor's Blessage. — Legislative Action. - Special December Session. - Party Spirit Rising. - Cornelius S. Bushnell builds the Bonitor
183

CHAPTER XIII.

The Sixth embarks for Florida. - Return to Hilton Head. - The Seventh goes to Tibee Island to besiege Fort Pulaski. - Labor of getting the Heavy Mortars in Position, A Case of Insanity. - Sixth gocs to Dawfuskie Island to cut off the Approaches from Savilungh.-Seventh miuus the Mortar Batteries. A Connecticut Affair. - The Battle. - Surrender of the l'ort. - The Sixth and Seventh and the First Connecticut Battery at James Island. - Assault on Lamar's Battery. --Severe Figliting. - Repulse and Withdrawal. - Bad Management by Gen. Benham. Casualties.
191

CHAPTER XIV.

The Fourth becomes the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery. Recruits. Goes with McClellan to the Peuiu-ula. - "Siege" of Yorktown. -- The Heavy Batteries. - "Ready."' - Bagruder falls back. - Detached as Infantry. The Seven-days' Battles. - Malvern Hill. Cavalry: - Among the Mountains of West Virginia. --- Afcer Bush whackers. Raids .-Charge through Wordensville. - Dash into New Market. - Ambush at Harrisonburg: -- Cross Kers. Jacksou Ubiquitous. The Pittb at Winchester. - Battle and Repulse. - In Maryland again. Slaughter at Cedar dlountain. - Bravery and Severe Losses of the Fildi. - Stone, Blake, Dutton, Smith
208

CHAPTER XV.

PAGE
The Summer of 1862. - The Fourteenth Regiment called for. - The Military Situation. -Appeal of the Exeentive. - Enthusiastic Response by the People. -- War-Meetings and Local Effort. - Recruiting Committees. — The Fourteenth full. – New Haven raises the Fitteenth. — Hartford recruits the Sixteenth. - Seventeenth from Fairfield County. - Eighteenth from New- London County. Nineteenth from Litchfield County. - Twentieth and Tweuty-first organized. - The Second Battery goes from Bridgeport. - All assigned to the ** Army of the Potomac"
222

CHAPTER XVI.

The Call for Seven Regiments of Nine-months Jien. The second Great Uprising. - Recruiting Active. - XIeetings and Bounties. - A Draft announced. - The Camps. Exemption sought. Skulks and Cowards. – The Surgeons besieged.- The White-liver Complaint. - Incidents. - How New Haven filled her Quota. - The Day of the Draft. - The Mountain brings forth. - All the Regiments Full. - The Twenty-second from Hartford and Tolland Counties. - Twenty-third from Fairfield and New Haven. Twenty-fourth from Middlesex.-Twenty-fifth from Hartford. - Twenty-sixth from New London and Windham. -Twenty-seventh. from New Haven. -Twenty-eighth from Fairfield and Litchfield. - The Rendezvous on Long Island.
240

CHAPTER XVII.

The Eighth and Eleventh near Newberne. - To Newport News. - Re-organization of the Eleventh. – To Fredericksburg - Pope, defeated, retreats on Washington. - Col. Kingsbury in command of the Brigade.— Arrival in Washington.- Movement into Maryland. - The Fourteenth and Sixteenth join the Column. --South Mountain. -The Affair of Turper's Gap. - Choice Rebel Literature
255

CHAPTER XVIII.

Battle of Antietam. - Charge of the Eleventh. - Exploit of Capt. Gibbons. The Contest for the Stone Bridge.- Inexplicable Condnet of Burnside. - Coolness and Efficiency of the Fourteenth. - Charge of Harlaud's Brigade. - Capt. Chuirles L. Upham's Company capture a Battery: - Great Bravery of the Eighth. – Gallant Conduct of Col. Appelman. - Fatality of the Color-Guard. - Harland assumes Command of Rodmau's Division. - Severe Losses. - Sufferings of the Wounded. - Corporal Henry A. Eastman of the t'eventh. – Death of Col. Kingsbury and others. — Total Casualties of the Battle. - Death of Major-Gen. Joseph K. F. Mansfield.-- Biography of Bluosfield. - Retreat of Lee's Army
264

CHAPTER XIX.

Tardy Pursuit of Lee. - The Eighth, Eleventh, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Twenty-first Connecticut Volunteers. - Gen. Burnside in Command. - March to Falmouth. - The Battle of Fredericksburg. - Gallantry of the Fourteenth and Twenty-seventh. -- Gen. Haral's Official Report. - The Disastrous Repulse. - Whereabouts of the Fifth, Seventeenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-second. - Private Elias Howe, Jr. -- The Army Rationi. - Camp at Staford Court House.
288

CHAPTER XX.

The First Connecticut Battery and Seventh Regiment in Florida. - Capture of St. John's Bluft. - Sixth and Seventh in Sonth Carolina. - Battle of Pocotaligo. - The Twelfth at Camp Parapet. -Yankee Enterprise. - Anecdotes of the Thirteenth. - Services and Sufferings of the Ninth at Vicksburg. - The Battle of Baton Rouge. - The La Fourche Campaign. — Battle of Georgia Laurling. - Thanksgiving. - The Nine months' Regiments leave Long Island. - The Twenty-eighth at Pensacola. – Destruction of a Rebel Gunboat.
803

CHAPTER XXI.

Spring Election of 1863. The Peace Wing of the Democracy again Demonstrative. Buckingham rerous Seymour. — “No more War!”- The Platforms. --Gov. Seymour's Letter. - Appeals from tlie Connecticut Reginents in the field. --Sharp Extracts. -The Vote. Eaton's Resolutions in the Assembly. - After Fredericksburg. - The Eighth, Eleveuth, Filteenth, Sixteenth, and Twenty-first at Newport News. - Siege of Suffolk. Skirmizlies and Recomoissances. -Capture of Fort Huger. - Raising of the Siege. – Evacuation.—"'The Blackberry Raic"

CHAPTER XXII.

PAGE
The Tenth Connecticut Volunteere at Newbeme. - Expedition to the laterior. - The Tarborough Scout.- Forage and Rations. — An Incident of Slavers. - The Battle of Kinston. - The Tenth at the Front. - The Contest for the Bridge. - Complimented by Gen. Foster. Henry Losses. - The Railroad destroyed at Goldsborough. - Gallauntry. -10 St. Helena Island. - Camp and Surroundings. - The Eighteenth Connecticut Volunteers still at Baltimore. -Joins Milroy at Winchester. — The Situation.- Battle of the First Day. - The Second Day at the Intrenchments. The Evacuation—The Charge into the Woods—Surrender of the Eighteenth.—Casualties.—Colors saved
341

CHAPTER XXIII.

Battle of Chancellorsville. - Advance upon the Flank. - The Fifth, Fourteenth, Seventeenth, Twentieth, and Tweaty-seventh Connecticut Regiments engaged. - The 11th Corps overwhelmed by Stone wall Jackson. - Terrible Battle of May 3. - Heavy Losses of the Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers. - The Twenty-seventh Regiment captured. - A New Line of Battle. - Witlıdrawal of the Army, and Failure of the Movement. -Losses of the Connecticut Regiments. - Prisoners of War
358

CHAPTER XXIV.

Race of the Hostile Armies Northward. - Battle of Gettysburg. - The Fifth, Fourteenth, Seventeentlı, Twentieth, and Twenty-seventh Connecticut Regiments engaged, Second Light Battery. - The Affair of July 1. - The Assault of July 2. - Attack on the Loft Flank. - Terrible Fighting of July 3.- Connecticut Correspondents. - The Losses in our Regiments.- Scenes on the Battle-Field. – The “ Fourth of July." - Tardy Pursuit of Lee. - Our Troops again in Virginia.
378

CHAPTER XXV.

Biograplical Sketch of Admiral Foote. - His Adventures, Battles, and Death. – Banks's Expedition. - Feint towards Port Hudson. - March Southward. - Battle of Irish Bend. - The Cotton-Raid up the Atchafalnya. Investment of Port Hudson. — The Fight of May 27.- The Twelfth, Thirteenth, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth, and Twenty eighth Connecticut. - The Charge of June 14. - Failure and Heavy Losses. - The Twenty-fourth in the Cotton-Fort. - The Forlorn Hope. - Our Roll of Honor. - Surrender of Port Hudson
397

CHAPTER XXVI.

After the Capture of Port Hudson. - The Twelfth, Thirteenth, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, Twenty--ixth, and Twenty-eighth Connecticut Regiments.- Casualties. Incidents of the Battle. - The Twenty-third in Southern Louisiana. - Guarding the Railroad. - At Irashear City. - Battle and Capture. - Casualties. - Imprisonment in Texas. - Return Home of the Nine-months' Regiments.
420

CHAPTER XXVII.

Sixth and Seventh in Florida. - The Advance on Charleston. - The Situation at Folly and Morris Islands. - Gen. Terry and the Tenth on Janes Island. - A Detachment of the Seventh the first to land on Morris Island. - Capture of the Batteries. --The Battalion of the Seventh in the First Charge on Wagner: --Fight on James Island. The First Connecticut littery.- Daring Charge of the Sixth on Wagner. – Three Service of the Seventeenth Connecticut Volunteers. Heavy litteries. — Bombardment of Sumter. - Capture of Wagner and Gregg. - The Lolloflonor. - The Sixth at Hilton Head. - The Seventh at St. Helena Island. - The Seventeenth on Folly Island. - The Tenth in Florida. - Death of Col. Chatfield,
436

CHAPTER XXVIII.

More Trompa wanted. - A Draft. - The Result. - Call for Seven Hundred Thousand Men.– Seven Hured Dollars' Bounty. - Work of l'ecruiting - The Twenty-ninth Regint.- Enlistment and Departure. - Re-euli-tment of Vet 119.- Recruiting Rapid. The Quotal of the Srate full, with a Surplus - Soiliers-ail Societies. - Wayford, Bridgeport, New Haven, Norwich, Danbury, Derby. - The Work at llume and in the Field. - A Thanksgiving Dimmer
458

CHAPTER XXIX.

Harland's Brigade near Portsmouth. -- More Digging: - A Handsome Camp. --- The Twenty-first on Provost-Buty in Portsmouth and Norfolk. - Raid through Distal Swamp. – The Eleventh at Gloucester Point. - Twenty-first at Scwport News. -An Expedition up the James. — Fifteenth and Sixteenth go to North Carolina. -“ Accidental" Fire. -Twenty-first at Newport Barracks and Newberne. - The Sixteenth at Plymouthi. - Battle and Capture by the Rebels. - Gen. Peck's Order.
457

CHAPTER XXX.

The First Cavalry Battalion. - Demoralization. Increased to a Regiment. - Fight in Virginis. - At Baltimore. - To the Field. - The Eighteenth Connecticut. - At Martinsburg. - Gen. Slilroy on Winchester. -- Prisno-Life. - Officers at Libby. - Diversions. – To Macon. — Escapes. - An Interesting Adventure
489

CHAPTER XXXI.

The First and Second Artillery, Sixth, Tenth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth, during the Winter of 1863-64.- The Second Light Battery. - The Seventh in Florida. - Battle of Olustee. - Ninth in Yew Orleans. The Twelfth at Now Iberia. - The Thirteenth in the Red-River Expedition. - Battle of Cane River. - Connecticut Regiments Home on Veteran Furlough. - Speeches and Banquets.
504

CHAPTER XXXII.

The Sixteenth in Rebel Prisons. -- The Enlisted Men at Anderson ville. - Rations. — Terrible Suffering in the Stockade. - The "Dead Line." - Starvation.- Insanity.- The Patriot's Burial. — The flospital. - Officers at Macon. - Chivalry and Bloodhounds.- The Glorious Fourth." - In Charleston. - Efforts to escape. - Exchange
526

CHAPTER XXXIII.

Up the James River. - The Sixth, Seventhi, Eighth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Twenty-first at Bermuda Hundred. - A Reconnoissance. - The Railroad destroyed. - Battle of Drury's Bluff. - Ropulse and Heavy Lo-ees. - " Buttled up" within the Intrenchments. - Fight of the Twenty-first. - Death of Col. Arthur H. Dutton.- Losses of the Seventh. — The First Connecticut Artillery ordered to Bermuda Hundred.-- The Non-Veterans mustered out
636

CHAPTER XXXIV.

The Fourteenth at Stevensburg. - The Affair at Mine Run. - How to build Winter-Quarters, and low to enjoy them. - Figlit at Norton's lord. -- First Connecticut Cavalry joins the Army of the Potomac. - Grant crosses thc Rapidan. - Struggle of the 11ilderocss.- Flank Sareli to Sputt-ylvania. - Terrible Fighting. — The Second Connectient Artillery (Nineteenthi) comes up. - Gen. Robert 0. Tyler commands a Division. - Spirited Coutest. - The First Cavalry in Front of Richmond. - To the North Anna. - Another Flank Slovement. Death of Gen. John Sedgwick.- His Character and Public Services
560

CHAPTER XXXV.

The First Connecticut Cavalry.-Severe Service. - Battle of Ashland. - Brilliant Personal Encounter. - Bravery and Losses. - Battle of Cold Harbor. - Charge of the Second Connecticut Artillery. - Terrible Losses. - Death of Col. E. S. Kellogg --Casualties of the Fourteentli. - Thc Charge of Junc 3.- Losses of the Lighth, Eleventh, and Twenty-first Connecticut. - Death of Col. Burpee and Major Conversc. -Organization of the Thirtieth Connecticut.
581

CHAPTER XXXVI.

After Cold Harbor. - The First Cavalry. - To Petersburg. – Exploit of the Eighth. -Charge of the Eleventh. - The Second, l'ourteenth, and Twenty-first. --The Sixth, Seventh, Ninth, and Tenth at Bermuda Hundred. - Wilson's Raid. - The First Cavalry. - Bold Ride of Capt. Whitaker. -- Incidents. - l'irst Connecticut Artilery. -Siege-Work of the Summer.-Battle of Strawberry Plains. - The Tlıirtieth Connecticut at the Mine. - Death of Col. Stedmau and Lient.-Col. Moegling .
602

CHAPTER XXXVII.

General Asscmbly: - Adjourned Session in January, 1864. - Spring Session. - Governor's Message. -Tlie Ballot given to Soldiers in the field. - Calls for Troops. --- Recruiting. - The Quotas filled. - How it was done. -- Presidential Election. The Twenty-ninth (colored) io Sonth Carolina. - The Eighteenth Regiment - Home on Furlough. - Advance with Sigel. - Defeat at Ncwmarket. - Victory at Piedmout. - Loss of Brave Men. - Pushing South. - Across the James. - Advance on Lynchburg. - Repulse and Retreat. --- Early Attacks Washington.- Affair at Snicker's Ferry
829

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

The Dead Lock at Petersburg. - Flank Movement on the Right. - The Sixth, Seventh, Tenth, Fourteenthi, and Twenty-niath Connecticut, and the First Battery, engaged. - Four-mile Run. - Battle of Deep Run. Charge by Terry's Division. ---Strawberry Plaios. -Withdrawal. - Casualties. — The Fourteenth at Reams's Station.- Casualties. - Incidents along the Line.
648

CHAPTER XXXIX.

Still in Front of Petersburg. - Demonstration on the Left. - The Fourteenth.- Advance of Butler. - Chaffiu's Bluft. - Capture of Fort Harrison. - The Eighth and Twenty-first. - The Sixth, Seventh, Tenth, and Twenty-tinth on the Right. - Rebel Repulse Casualties. Attack on Terry's Line. — Liepulse. - Counter-Attack. Death of Major H. W. Camp. - Hawley's Brigade on the Darbytown Road. - The Twenty-ninth as Skirmishers. The second and Fourteenth on Hatcher's Run.- Hawley's Division at New York. - The First Artillery. - Butler fails to capture Fort Fisher. -Terry takes it by Storm
664

CHAPTER XL.

The Fifth and Twentieth ja Tennessee. - Guarding the Railroad. - Fight with Guerrillas. - Retaliation. - Advance of the Spring, — The Twentieth at Boyd's Trail. - Battle of Resaca. — Amusing Incidents. The Fifth and Twentieth at Peach-tree Creek. Sherinan's Flank Movement. - Atlanta occupied. - Casualties in the Commecticut Regiments. -- A Rest. - The March to the Sea. - At Savannah. - Second Connecticut Battery. - In Louisiana and at Mobile. — “The Bay Fight
692

CHAPTER XLI.

Sheridan takes Command in the Shenandoah. - The First Connecticut Cavalry, Second Artillery, anıl Ninth, Twelfth, Thirteenth, and Lighteenth Infantry. - At Winchester. Kearneysvilic. - Skirmishes. - Battle of Opcquan Creek. - Casualties. - Spring Hill. - Cedar Creek. - Defeat and Victory. Teavy Losscs. — The Pursuit. - Roll of Honor of Yale College and Wesleyan University. — The Seventeenth in Florida. -Battles and Raids, -Successes and Disasters.Incidents. Casualties.
714

CHAPTER XLII,

Prison Experience of our Soldiers. - Testimony of a Confederate Surgeon. - Experience of Weston Ferris on Belle Isle. - Great Privation and Suffering. — Condition of Prisoners at Camp Ford, Tex. - Gen. E. M. Lee in Libby. - Capture of Major Sanford and Men of the Seventh. Adventures of Three Officers of the Sixteenth. - Fidelity of Surgeon Nickerson. — Thrilling Narrative of Lieut. Nailey. – Deaths ut Andersonville. - Incidents of Martyrdoin
737

CHAPTER XLII.

Affairs before Richmond. - Grant and Sherman of Connecticut Stock. - Genealogy.- Location and Organization of Connecticut Regiments. - The First Cavalry returns to l'etersburg Whitaker captures Major Gilmor, Twelfth und Eighteeuth Regiments. - First Artillery.--- Death of Lieut.-C... Trumbull. ---Scond Artilicry. First: Second, and Third Batteries. — Sixth an Seventh.- Death of Chaplain Eaton. Eighth, Eleventh, Twenty-first, and Twenty-ninth. - Ninth and Toirteenth. Tenth and Fourteenth. - Sherman's Great March North wurd. - The life and I wentieth. - Incidents of the Campaign.- Battles and Victories. - Casualties, – Disaster of the Fifteenth Connecticut. - The Sixteenth
155

CHAPTER XLIV.

Spring of 1865. – The Beginning of the End. -- Petersburg. - Rebel Assault on Fort Stedman. - Repulse. - Service of the First Connecticut Artillery. - The Second Artillery and the Fourteenth on the Left. - The Tenth and Thirtieth. - 'The First Cavalry at Fire Forlss. - The Tenth at Fort Gregg. - Unsurpassed Gallantry. -Advance of the Whole Line. - Lee evacuates Petersburg and Richmond. - The Retreat and Pursuit. - First Cavalry at Sailor's Creek. - Lee surrounded. - The Surrender. - In North Carolina. - The Capitulation of Johnston's Army.
776

CHAPTER XLV.

Matters at Home. - General Assembly of 1865. - The Governor's Blessage. - Legislation. Number of Solliers sent from the State. - Our Regiments after the Close of the War. - Two Pictures from Richmond. - Terry and Hawley in Virginis. - Presentations. - Juster-out of Connecticut Regiments. The Fourteenth - Twentieth. -First. Second, and Third Light Batteries, -Twenty-first. - Eighteenth.- Sixteenth.- Fifteenth. – Fifth. - Seventeenth.- First Cavalry. - Sixth. – Seventh. -Twelfth. - Second Artillery. - Ninth. - Tenth. - First Artillery - Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth. - Eighth and Eleventh. - Thirteenth. - Thanks of the Legislatare.
798

APPENDIX.

The Sons of Connecticut residing in New York. - The Connecticut Agency in New York. The Agency in Wasbington. Gen. Alken's Visit to Washington. - Connecticut in the Navy. - The Expenses for War Purposes. -- The Generals of Connecticut. Organizations and Casualties. - Roll of Honor.- Our Martyrs at Andersonville
833