The Annals of Wales
(Part VII)

by Anonymous, translated from Latin by Wikisource

Year.
Year. Battle against Eumonia. The burial of Bangor Daniel.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Conversion of Constantine to the Lord.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Edilbert ruled in England.
Year. Columchilla died. Dunaut son of Pabo died. Augustine is s[en]t to convert the Angles to Christ.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. The Synod of Legion City. Gregory went to Christ.[1] David the bishop of Meneva died.[2]
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. The burial of bishop Kennauc.
Year. Aidan son of Gawran died.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Chendeirn died.
Year.
Year. The Battle of Kairlion, in which Seysil son of Chinan and Jacob son of Beli died with many others.
Year. Cheredi died.
Year. [Et]guin begins to rule.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. The sun is covered.
Year.

Year. [Et]guin is baptized by Paulinus, bishop of York
Year. Belin died.
Year.
Year. The siege of King Catwallaun on the [is]land Glannauc.
Year. The Battle of Meigen, in which Edwin is killed with his two sons. Catwallaun truly was the victor.
Year. Battle of Cantescaul in which Catwallaun collapsed with his [men].
Year. The slaughter of the Severn and the strangulation of Idris.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. The Battle of Chochui in which Oswald king of the no[r]th and Edda king of the Mercians died.
Year. The attack on Demetia, when the monastery of David was burnt.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Slaughter in Guent.
Year. The rise of a star.[3]
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. The [s]laughter of the Ga[i]us plains.
Year. The murder of Penda.
Year. Oswid came and seized plunder.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Brochwail Eschitrauc dies.
Year.
Year.
Year. The first Easter is celebrated among the Saxons.[4]
Year.
Year.

Year.
Year. Oswid king of the Saxons dies.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. A star is seen shining with amazing greatness by the whole world.[3]
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. A battle of the Angles against the Britons on the plains of Liphi.[5]
Year. There was great death in Britain,[6] for which Catwaladir son of Catwallaun fled to Lesser Britain.
Year. There was death in Hibernia.
Year. The movement of the earth in Eumonia became great.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Bloody rain fell in Britain and in Hybernia. Milk and butter were turned into blood.[7]
Year. The moon was turned into the color of blood.[8]
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year. Aelfrid king of the Saxons died.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.
Year.

NotesEdit

  1. Presumably, though not definitely, Pope Gregory the Great (died 604). The C text explicitly calls him Papa but dates the occasion to the mid-6th century.
  2. The C text takes this opportunity to claim that St. David's was elevated to an archbishopric; this may have been true within the Celtic church as it resisted Augustine's authority and Rome's revised Easter tables, but it certainly wasn't recognized and didn't last.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Possibly a supernova or great comet. Halley's Comet appeared in 684, but returns in other centuries without attracting notice.
  4. This entry does not reference the actual first Easter, which had been celebrated since the arrival of Augustine, but instead the resolution of the Easter controversy by Northumbria's acceptance of the then-current Roman computus.
  5. L. anus. bellum anglorum in campo liphi contra britones. which on its face would mean a battle between the Welsh and English on the Liffey in Ireland. Presumably the Llynfi or some otherwise unknown location on Great Britain is intended instead. In the unlikely event the entry does describe an (otherwise unrecorded) battle in Ireland, it would have been near the Leinster capital Naas around the reigns of Faelan mac Colmain and Fiannamail mac Mael Tuile.
  6. Possibly a return of Justinian's Plague, which struck Europe every few generations until the mid-8th century; although the Chronicle of the Princes (Brut) calls it y fall felen (i.e., the same "Yellow Plague" that struck earlier during the reign of Maelgwn Gwynedd). The chronicle goes on to say the illness—and the famine that followed—lasted ten years.
  7. The Brut records this happening in 698, 24 years after Cadwaladr's flight (674), not 7 as here.
  8. Possibly owing to volcanic dust from an eruption around this time.