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JOSEPHINE KIPP A woman of the century (page 448 crop).jpgJOSEPHINE KIPP. KIPP, Mrs. Josephine, author, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 27th March, 1845. Her father. Ten Eyck Sutphen, for many years a prominent New York merchant, was descended from an old Dutch family of colonial times, who originally came from the city of Zutphen, where traditions of the "Counts of Zutphen" still exist. In Mrs. Kipp's early childhood she developed a passion for music, which led her to devote to the art every moment that could be spared from more prosaic studies. After spending several years in a French school, and afterward attending Packer Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., at sixteen years of age she removed with her parents to New York City, where she was graduated from Rutgers' College, having had also the advantage of Prof. Samuel Jackson's training in music. In October, 1870, she became the wife of Rev. P. E. Kipp, of Passaic, N. J. The first five years of their married life were spent in Fishkill, N. Y., where their two children were born. Surrounded by parishioners and busied with domestic cares and the duties which fill the life of a minister's wife, Mrs. Kipp accomplished little literary work. Ill health prevented all effort for a time, and, her husband's strength also failing, the family spent a winter in Bermuda. Recuperated by their sojourn there, husband and wife returned to work in Brooklyn, N. Y.. but after three years of service they were compelled to seek rest and strength in European travel. They next settled in Schenectady, N. Y., whence they removed in 1887 to their present home in Cleveland, Ohio. During these frequent periods of enforced idleness Mrs. Kipp's pen was her great resource. A musical book by her remains incomplete, on account of a serious ocular trouble. Many of her articles have appeared in religious journals and in magazines of the day. When health has permitted, Mrs. Kipp has given most entertaining and instructive parlor lectures upon historical subjects.