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This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924.


The author died in 1922, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.

 


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PUBLISHED AT THE WINTER QUARTERS OF THE BRITISH ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION, 1907, DURING THE WINTER MONTHS OF APRIL, MAY, JUNE, JULY 1908.

ILLUSTRATED WITH LITHOGRAPHS AND ETCHINGS; BY GEORGE MARSTON

 

PRINTED AT THE SIGN OF 'THE PENGUINS'; BY JOYCE AND WILD.

LATITUDE 77° ⋅⋅ 32' SOUTH LONGITUDE 166° ⋅⋅ 12' EAST ANTARCTICA

 

(All rights reserved)


DEDICATED

to

MISS DAWSON-LAMBTON.

and

MISS ELIZABETH DAWSON-LAMBTON,

who have ever shown the deepest

interest in Antarctic Exploration,

and our welfare.



PREFACE

Some six years ago it fell to my lot to edit and print the first Antarctic publication; it is my fortune now to edit another.

There are essential differences between the two efforts, for The South Polar Times was typewritten and only one copy could be issued, whereas Aurora Australis is actually printed, and therefore allows of a larger edition. Again; the labours of the Editor are light, for the bulk of the work falls on the shoulders of the Printers and Artist.

If it had not been for the great generosity of the firm of Sir J. Causton & Sons, Ltd., we would never have had this opportunity of making such a memento of the winter months, for the above firm not only presented us with an entire printing and lithographic outfit including the necessary paper, but also allowed our Printers and Artist to obtain instruction at their works.

Now; seven years is the usual time to serve as apprentice to the printing and lithographic trades, and as only three weeks could be spared by the producers of this little book to learn the business, any shortcomings will be leniently viewed both by the small public in this colony and by our friends at home to whom we trust these pages will be of interest.

I take this opportunity to specially thank not only the heads of the firm that made this book possible, but also the managers of the various departments and the foremen, who did everything in their power to help our people.

During the sunless months which are now our portion; months lit only by vagrant moon and elusive aurora; we have found in this work an interest and a relaxation, and hope eventually it will prove the same to our friends in the distant Northland.

E. H. Shackleton.



ADDITIONAL PREFACE

Since writing the preface for this book I have again looked over its pages, and though I can see but little not up to usual standard in bookmaking, the printers are not satisfied that it is everything that it ought to be. But the reader will understand better the difficulty of producing such a book quite up to the mark when he is told that, owing to the low temperature in the hut, the only way to keep the printing ink in a fit state to use was to have a candle burning under the inking plate; and so, if some pages are printed more lightly than others it is due to the difficulty of regulating the heat, and consequently the thinning or thickening of the ink. Again the printing office was only six feet by seven and had to accomodate a large sewing machine and bunks for two men, so the lack of room was a disadvantage; but I feel sure that those who see this book will not be captious critics. The printing was entirely done by Joyce and Wild, the lithography and etchings by Marston, and the covers made of provision cases were manufactured by Day. It is therefore to these four that the carrying out of the Aurora Australis is due; most of us have contributed an article of some sort, and I as Editor feel an interest in the work, as it was a pleasure to see it progressing; and I trust that all who have a copy will think kindly of the first attempt to print a book and illustrate it in the depth of an Antarctic Winter.

E. H. Shackleton.