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(III)[1]

O my god, who art angry with me, turn [thy face?] towards me!
O my goddess, who viewest me with displeasure, receive my prayer!
Receive my prayer! Let thy soul be pacified!
O my lord, forgiving and merciful,
Who guidest the span of life and softenest death, receive my supplication!
O my goddess, look favourably upon me, accept my prayer!
May my sins be absolved, and my misdeeds forgotten!
May the evil spell be broken and the fetters loosened!
May my sighing be carried away by the seven winds!
Let me rend asunder the evil, let the bird take it away to heaven!
May the fish take off my trouble, let the stream bear it away!
May the beasts of the field carry it away from me, and wash it away in flowing water!
Make me bright like a golden cord (?)!
As the brilliance of a —— stone may I be of value before thee!
Remove the evil, protect my life, so shall I protect thy forecourt, and set up thy image (?).
Let the evil depart from me, so that I may be preserved with thee!
Let me have a propitious dream,
The dream which I dream, may it be propitious, yea, established be the dream which I dream!
The dream which I dream, turn it to good.
May the god Maḫir, the god of dreams, stand at my head!
Let me enter E-sagila, the temple of the gods, the house of life!
To Marduk, the merciful and compassionate, into his merciful hands deliver me!
So shall I do homage to thy greatness and extol thy godhead!
May the dwellers in my city glorify thy might . . . may mankind extol thee!

 
  1. The text is published in Rawlinson, iv. (2nd ed.), 59, No. 2. transliterated and translated by Zimmern, Busspsalmen, No. 9.