Open main menu

Birds of North and Middle America, part V/Genus 8. Dysithamnus Cabanis

 

Genus DYSITHAMNUS Cabanis.

Dysithamnus[1] Cabanis, in Wiegmann's Archiv für Naturg., xiii, pt. i, 1847, 223. (Type, Lanius guttulatus Lichtenstein.)
Dasythamnus (emendation) Burmeister, Syst. Ueb. Th. Bras., iii, 1856, 82.
Silvestrius[2] Bertoni, Aves Nuevas del Paraguay, 1901, 136. (Type, Thamnophilus {Silvestrius) flavescens Bertoni = Myothexa mentalis Temminck.)

Small Formicariidæ (length about 100-115 mm.) with bill much shorter than head, tail less than three-fourths as long as wing and slightly rounded, tarsus one-third as long as wing, and plainly colored plumage (olive or olive-greenish above, becoming gray or slate colored on head and neck, the pileum sometimes streaked or spotted with blackish, mostly whitish or yellowish below, sometimes with streaks on throat and chest, females more brownish, with pileum rufescent.

Bill much shorter than head, its width at frontal antiæ slightly greater than its depth at same point and equal to about half the distance from nostril to tip of maxilla; culmnen distinctly but not sharply ridged, nearly straight for most of its length, strongly and rather abruptly decurved terminally, the tip of maxilla moderately to rather strongly uncinate; maxillary tomium straight, distinctly notched subterminally; mandibular tomium nearly straight, minutely toothed and notched subterminally, the tip of mandible forming a short recurved point; gonys gently convex, slightly ascending terminally, not prominent basally. Nostril exposed, posteriorly in contact with feathering of latero-frontal antiæ, roundish or broadly oval, its upper- posterior margin membraneous, the interior tubercle visible within posterior portion. Rictal bristles present but minute, the feathers of chin, anterior portion of malar region, and lores with long terminal setæ. Wing moderate, with longest primaries extending to decidedly beyond secondaries; sixth and seventh, or fourth, fifth and second, primaries longest, the tenth (outermost) less than three-fifths but more than half as long as the longest, the ninth about equal to or slightly shorter than secondaries. Tail a little more than half to more than two-thirds as long as wing, slightly rounded or nearly even, the rectrices (12) narrow, subrounded or subacuminate terminally. Tarsus much longer than exposed culmen, about one-third as long as wing, slender, the acrotarsium distinctly scutellate, the plantar scutella in two longitudinal series, less distinct on outer side; middle toe, with claw, much shorter than tarsus; outer toe, without claw, reaching to slightly beyond middle of subterminal phalanx of middle toe, the inner toe a little shorter; hallux about as long as inner toe, but much stouter; basal phalanx of middle toe wholly united to outer toe, for about half its length to inner toe; claws moderate in size and curvature, that of the hallux decidedly shorter than the digit. Plumage full, soft, and blended, longer and more lax on rump; pileum not crested.

Coloration. — Adult males olive or olive-greenish above, the head and neck gray or slate-colored (sometimes streaked or spotted with blackish), the lesser wing-coverts black, spotted with white or with a white area on inner-anterior portion; under parts mostly whitish or yellowish (at least medially), the throat and chest sometimes streaked with gray or blackish. Adult females duller in color, with pileum rufescent.

Range. — Guatemala to British Guiana, southeastern Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru. (About ten species.)[3]

KEY TO THE SPECIES AND SUBSPECIES OF DYSITHAMNUS.

a. Pileum and hindneck at least partly slate color or slate-gray. (Adult males.)

b. Pileum and hindneck without black or white markings.
c. A narrow white spot or streak on lower edge of auricular region. (Southwestern Brazil; Bolivia?)

'Dysithamnus affinis, adult male (extralimital).[4]

cc. No trace of white spot or streak on lower edge of auricular region. (Dysithamnus mentalis.)
d. Under parts of body more deeply yellowish, strongly and abruptly contrasted with grayish white of throat. (Southeastern Brazil; Paraguay.)

Dysithamnus mentalis mentalis, adult male (extralimital).[5]

dd. Under parts of body paler yellowish (sometimes white).
e. Abdomen more or less yellowish; back more or less olivaceous, different from color of pileum and hindneck.
f. Larger (wing 63.5-66.5).
g. Paler. (Tobago.)

Dysithamnus mentalis oberi, adult male (extralimital).[6]

gg. Darker. (Colombia and Venezuela.)

Dysithamnus mentalis semicinereus, adult male (extralimital).[7]

ff. Smaller (wing 57-62). (Panama to Guatemala.)

Dysithamnus mentalis septentrionalis, adult male (p. 55).

ee. Abdomen white; back slate color, concolor with pileum and hindneck.
f. Lighter and clearer slate color above, more extensively white beneath, the flanks paler and less olive or buffy brownish. (Trinidád.)

Dysithamnus mentalis andrei, adult male (extralimital).[8]

ff. Darker and duller slate color above, less extensively white beneath, the flanks darker and more bluffy brownish. (British Guiana.)

Dysithamnus mentalis spodionotus, adult male (extralimital).[9]

bb. Pileum and hindneck streaked or spotted with black (sometimes also spotted with white).
c. Pileum with small rounded spots of white; throat and foreneck more narrowly streaked; tail 34-38. (Costa Rica and western Panamá.)

Dysithamnus puncticeps, adult male (p. 58).

c. Pileum without white spots; throat and foreneck more broadly streaked; tail 30-35. (Costa Rica.)

Dysithamnus striaticeps, adult male (p. 59).

aa. Pileum and hindneck rufescent brown, cinnamomeous, or tawny, very different from olive or olive-brown of back.

b. Pileum, throat, and chest without streaks; wing-coverts much less distinctly tipped with buff.
c. Under parts strongly buffy, the abdomen white or pale buffy (never yellow); pileum and hindneck more strongly and more extensively rufescent, the back, etc., lighter and more buffy olive.

Dysithamnus affinis, adult female (extralimital).

cc. Under parts olivaceous (not buffy) laterally and on chest, the abdomen pale yellowish or whitish. (Dysithamnus mentalis.)[10]
d. Sides and chest much darker olivaceous.

Dysithamnus mentalis semicinereus, adult female (extralimital).

dd. Sides and chest much paler olivaceous.
e. Abdomen pale olive-yellowish.

Dysithamnus mentalis septentrionalis, adult female (p. 56).

ee. Abdomen white

Dysithamnus mentalis andrei, adult female (extralimital).

bb. Pileum, throat, and chest streaked with dusky; wing-coverts much more distinctly tipped with buffy.
c. Tail 36.5-40; under parts more strongly buffy, with chest, etc., more narrowly streaked; pileum paler tawny or cinnamomeous, more distinctly streaked with dusky

Dysithamnus puncticeps, adult female (p. 58).

cc. Tail 29-35.5; under parts less strongly buffy (whitish medially), with chest more heavily streaked ; pileum darker tawny, less distinctly streaked with dusky

Dysithamnus striaticeps, adult female (p. 60).

DYSITHAMNUS MENTALIS SEPTENTRIONALIS Ridgway.

NORTHERN ANTVIREO.

Similar to D. m. semicinereus[11] but decidedly smaller; adult male lighter in color of upper parts, adult female with sides and flanks paler olive. Adult male. — Pileum and hindneck plain slate color, becoming paler (slate-gray) on supra-auricular region; back, scapulars, rump, and upper tail-coverts plain olivaceous-slate color (more decidedly olivaceous posteriorly) contrasting more or less strongly with slate color of hindneck and pileum; tail darker slaty olive or olivaceous- slate, the outermost rectrices usually narrowly tipped with whitish; auricular region slate color (usually somewhat darker than pileum), sometimes with very narrow shaft-streaks of whitish; lores and suborbital region slate-grayish indistinctly mottled or flecked with paler, the latter and posterior portion of the former sometimes uniform dark slate color; malar region pale gray or grayish white, indistinctly barred or transversely flecked with darker; outer web of exterior row of scapulars broadly edged with white, the white usually margined internally by a narrow line of dusky; lesser wing-coverts black, at least some of the feathers tipped, more or less distinctly, with white, the inner-anterior portion of the area occupied by a white patch; middle coverts black distinctly tipped with white; greater coverts slate color or slate-gray narrowly tipped with white; remiges similar in color to back, etc., the terminal portion of longer primaries more brownish; chin and throat white or grayish white; chest pale gray medially, darker (slate-gray) laterally, passing into light olive on flanks; breast (medially) white or yellowish white, passing into pale yellow (primrose to nearly straw yellow) on abdomen and under tail-coverts; under wing-coverts mostly pale yellow, the inner webs of remiges broadly edged with the same; maxilla dusky, paler on tomium; mandible paler (plumbeous in life); iris brown; legs and feet dusky (plumbeous in life); length (skins), 101-113 (108.5); wing, 57-63 (59.4); tail, 37.5-41.5 (39.1); culmen, 14-15.5 (14.6); tarsus, 18-20 (19.2); middle toe, 11-12 (11.4).[12]

Immature male. — Similar to the adult male but remiges distinctly more brownish (nearly broccoli brown to light olive-brown), and breast yellowish, like abdomen.

Adult female. — Pileum chestnut-brown or russet, the feathers with indistinct shaft-streaks of paler; hindneck similar but less rufescent brown; back, scapulars, and rump plain olive (varying from grayish to brownish olive); upper tail-coverts and tail sepia brown; general color of wings olive, the middle and greater coverts narrowly and rather indistinctly tipped with buffy or pale buffy brownish; a narrow orbital ring of whitish; auricular region dusky olive or slaty olive, with narrow shaft-streaks of whitish or pale buffy; malar region, chin, and throat white, usually more or less tinged with pale yellowish olive or dull yellowish; rest of under parts pale yellowish, passing into light olive or buffy olive on sides and flanks, the under tail-coverts buffy; bill, etc., as in adult male; length (skins), 96-112 (106); wing, 54.5-62.5 (59.2); tail, 36-40.5 (38.6); culmen, 14.5-15.5 (14.9); tarsus, l8.5-20 (19.3); middle toe, 10.5-11.5 (11.1).[13]

Guatemala (Choctúm; Chiséc; sources of Rio de la Pasión), Costa Rica (Dota; Naranjo de Cartago; Grécia; Guaitíl; Juan Viñas; Las Mesas; El Generál; Buena Vista; Rio Platanár; Guayabo; Cariblanco de Sarapiquí; Navarro; Rio Huacúm; Laguária; Santa Maria de Dota), and Panamá (Panamá; Calovévora, Chitra, Calobre; and Santa Fe de Verágua; Boquete; Volcán de Chiriquí, and along Pacific coast to western Ecuadór (Chimbo)? (See Berlepsch and Taczanowski, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1883, 564.)

Dysithamnus semicinereus (not of Sclater, 1855) Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1858, 222, part (monogr.); Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., xv, 1890, 221, part (Chiséc, sources of Rio de la Pasión, and Choctúm, Guatemala; Costa Rica; Santa Fé de Verágua, Calovévora, and Panamá, Panamá). — Salvin and Sclater, Ibis, 1860, 399 (Choctúm, Guatemala; crit.). — Salvin, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1867, 144 (Santa Fé de Verágua); Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1870, 194 (Calovévora, Chitra, Calobre, and Volcan de Chiriquí, Panama). — Lawrence, Ann. Lyc. N. Y., ix, 1868, 107 (Turrialba, Dota, Grécia, and Guaitíl, Costa Rica). — Frantzius, Journ. für Orn., 1869, 305 (Costa Rica). — Boucard, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1878, 60 (Naranjo de Cartago, Costa Rica); Liste Ois. récol. Guat., 1878, 38. — Zeledón, Anal. Mus. Nac. Costa Rica, i, 1887, 114 (Cartago, Turrialba, and Dota, Costa Rica). — Bangs, Proc. New Engl. Zool. Club, iii, 1902, 41 (Boquete, Panamá, 4000-5000 ft.) — Salvin and Godman, Biol. Centr.-Am., Aves, ii, 1892, 206, part (excl. South American references and localities).
[Dysithamnus] semicinereus Sclater and Salvin, Nom. Av. Neotr., 1873, 70, part. — Sharpe, Hand-list, iii, 1901, 18, part.
Disithamnus semicinereus Cherrie, Expl. Zool. Merid. Costa Rica, 1893, 41 (Rio Huacúm, s. w. Costa Rica).
D[ysithamnius] olivaceus semicinereus Oberholser, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., xxv, no. 1281, Sept. 8, 1902, 129, in text (part).
Dysithamnus mentalis septentrionalis Ridgway, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., xxi, Oct. 20, 1908, 193 (Choctúm, Vera Paz, Guatemala; coll. U. S. Nat. Mus.). — Carriker, Ann. Carnegie Mus., xi, 1910, 606 (Caribbean slope, 2000-4000 ft., and foothills of s. w. Pacific slope, Costa Rica; habits). — Ferry, Pub. 146, Field Mus. N. H., orn. ser., i, no. 6, 1910, 271 (Guayabo, Costa Rica).

DYSITHAMNUS PUNCTICEPS Salvin.

SPOTTED-CROWNED ANTVIREO.

Adult male. — Pileum and hindneck black and slate-gray, dotted with white, the black in the form of irregular ("herring-bone") mesial streaks, broader on occiput and hindneck, the white dots more transverse on forehead; back, scapulars, rump, and upper tail- coverts slate color or deep slate-gray, usually tinged, more or less, with olive, especially on rump and upper tail-coverts; tail olive-slate or slaty olive; general color of wings similar to that of back, but concealed portion of feathers more dusky, the lesser coverts dotted with white, middle and greater coverts tipped, or terminally spotted, with white (forming two district narrow bands), primary coverts (usually at least) minutely marked at tip with white, and alula conspicuously edged with white; auricular region slate-gray, tinged with olive and indistinctly streaked with whitish, the suborbital and malar regions white, or yellowish white, streaked and barred with dusky grayish; sides of neck and sides of chest plain slate-gray, passing posteriorly into a more buffy olive hue on flanks; median under parts (broadly) white, passing into pale buffy yellowish posteriorly, the chest (sometimes lower throat also) usually more or less streaked with dusky; under wing-coverts and broad edgings to inner webs of remiges yellowish white, the carpo-metacarpal region spotted with dusky; maxilla brownish black, mandible dull whitish (pale bluish gray in life ?) ; legs and feet horn color (bluish gray in life ?); length (skins), 108-113 (110); wing, 58-61 (59); tail, 34-38 (36); tarsus, 20-20.5 (20.2); middle toe, 11-12 (11.5).[14]

Adult female. — Pileum light tawny-ochraceous, huffy cinnamon or wood brown, streaked, more or less broadly, with black, the streaks more or less cuneate or guttate and broader on occiput; back, scapulars, and rump plain light grayish olive or hair brown, the upper tail- coverts more brownish; tail dusky grayish brown with light olive- brown edgings, the lateral rectrices narrowly margined at tip with pale brownish buffy; anterior lesser wing-coverts concolor with back, but slightly darker centrally, the posterior ones and the middle coverts more dusky with a rather large terminal roundish spot of pale buffy; greater coverts dark brownish olive, edged with paler, the outer web with a roundish terminal spot of buffy; remiges olive- brown (more buffy on edges of primaries), their inner webs dusky grayish brown; supra-auricular region streaked or spotted with black and pale buff or buffy whitish; under parts buff, paler on throat and abdomen, more grayish or olivaceous on sides and flanks, the chest and throat (especially the former) narrowly streaked with black; bill, etc., as in adult male; length (skins), 103-107 (105); wing, 56.5-59 (57.7); tail, 36.5-40 (38.2); culmen, 15-17 (16); tarsus, 20-20.5 (20.2); middle toe, 12.5-13 (12.7).[15]

Costa Rica (San José; Pacuare; Rio Sícsola) and western Panamá (Santiago de Verágua).

Dysithamnus puncticeps Salvin, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1866, 72 (Santiago de Verágua, Panamá; coll. Salvin and Godman); 1867, 144 (Santiago de Verágua). — Zeledón, Anal. Mus. Nac. Costa Rica, 1887, 115 (Pacuare, Costa Rica). — Sclater, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., xv, 1890, 223 (Verágua). — Salvin and Godman, Biol. Centr.-Am., Aves, ii, 1892, 207, pl. 50, figs. 2, 3. — Carriker, Ann. Carnegie Mus., vi, 1910, 599 (in key; considered extralimital to Costa Rica?).
[Dysithamnus] puncticeps Sclater and Salvin, Nom. Av. Neotr., 1873, 71. — Sharpe, Hand-list, iii, 1901, 19.

DYSITHAMNUS STRIATICEPS Lawrence.

STREAKED-CROWNED ANTVIREO.

Adult male. — Pileum and hindneck slate-gray, broadly streaked with black, the streaks becoming obsolete on hindneck; back, scapulars, rump, and upper tail-coverts plain olive or grayish olive, the upper back sometimes inclining to slate-gray; tail russet-olive or olive-brown; lesser wing-coverts black, spotted with white, those along edge of wing mostly or wholly white; middle coverts black, tipped with a roundish spot of white or brownish white; greater coverts olive (darker on concealed portions), their outer webs tipped with brownish white (forming a narrow band across closed wing); remiges olive, with underlying portion dusky, paler on edge of primaries; alula black, the outermost feathers broadly edged with white; auricular region and sides of neck slate-gray, the former very indistinctly flecked with dusky; suborbital and malar regions paler gray, barred or flecked with dusky; chin, throat, and chest white, broadly streaked with slate-gray and with narrow blackish shaft- streaks; sides and flanks olive, more or less strongly suffused with buff; breast and abdomen white, or buffy white, passing into buff (more or less deep) on under tail-coverts; under wing-coverts mostly dull white; inner webs of remiges broadly edged with white; maxilla brownish black, mandible dull whitish (pale bluish gray, bluish horn color, or straw yellow in life);[16] iris brown, gray, grayish white, or bluish white;[16] legs and feet dusky or horn color (bluish gray or grayish blue in life);[16] length (skins), 94-112 (102); wing, 56.5-61 (59.2); tail, 31.5-35 (32.7); culmen, 15.5-17 (16.1); tarsus, 19-20.5 (19.8); middle toe, 11-12.5 (11.8).[17]

Adult female. — Pileum pale cinnamon to russet, more or less distinctly streaked with dusky; back, scapulars, rump, and upper tail coverts plain olive; tail brownish olive or olive-brown; general color of wings olive (paler on edges of primaries), the lesser and middle wing-coverts darker (sometimes blackish), each with a terminal spot of buff, the greater coverts with a buffy spot on tip of outer web; auricular region olive or buffy grayish, very narrowly streaked with whitish or buffy; suborbital and malar regions pale buffy, barred or flecked with dusky; chin and throat dull buffy whitish, usually with more or less distinct narrow streaks of dusky; rest of under parts buff (more or less deep) medially, this passing into olive on sides and flanks, the chest sometimes streaked with dusky; under wing-coverts mostly pale buff or dull buffy whitish, the inner webs of remiges broadly edged with the same; maxilla dusky brown, mandible dull whitish (in dried skins); legs and feet horn color (in dried skins); length (skins), 97-112 (103); wing, 56-60.5 (58.2); tail, 29-35.5 (32.2); culmen, 14.5-16.5 (15.4); tarsus, 18-21 (19.6); middle toe, 11-12.5 (11.9).[18]

Immature male. — Similar to the adult female but grayer above and more whitish beneath.

Costa Rica (Angostura; Talamanca; San Carlos; La Balsa; Dos Novillos; Siquirres; Guácimo; Guápiles; El Hogár; Carillo; La Christina; Rio Reventazón; Rio Sícsola; Miravalles; La Vijágua).

Dysithamnus striaticeps Lawrence, Ann. Lyc. Nat. Hist. N. Y., viii, May, 1867, 130 (Angostura, Costa Rica; colL U. S. Nat. Mus.); ix, 1868, 107 (do.).— Frantzius, Journ. für Orn., 1869, 305 (Costa Rica). — Boucard, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1878, 60 (San Carlos, Costa Rica). — Zeledón, Anal. Mus. Nac. Costa Rica, 1887, 115 (Angostura, Costa Rica). — Sclater, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., XV, 1890, 223 ("Valza," i. e.. La Balsa, Costa Rica). — Salvin and Godman, Biol. Centr.-Am., ii, 1892, 208. — Underwood, Ibis, 1896, 440 (Volcan de Miravalles, Costa Rica). — Carriker, Ann. Carnegie Mus., vi, 1910, 606 (Caribbean foothills, 800-1,500 ft., Costa Rica; habits; descr. nest and eggs).
[Dysithamnus] striaticeps Sclater and Salvin, Nom. A v. Neotr., 1873, 70. — Sharpe, Hand-list, iii, 1901, 19.


  1. ?, hineinbegeben; ?, Gebüsch. (Cabanis.)
  2. Named for Dr. Felipe Silvestri.
  3. I have not seen D. guttulatus (Lichtenstein), D. tambillanus Taczanowski, D. xanthopterus Burmeister, nor D. flemingi Hartert. All these except D. xanthopterus appear, however, to be congeneric with D. mentalis, etc., so far as I am able to judge from descriptions; but the style of coloration is so different in D. xanthopterus (chestnut-rufous wings and lower back, white spots on sides of head, etc.) that I doubt its close relationship.
    D. leucostictus Sclater, D. schistaceus (D'Orbigny), D. ardesiacus Sclater and Salvin, D. unicolor Sclater, and D. subplumbeus Sclater and Salvin, I unhesitatingly exclude, as being much more nearly related to the genus Erionotus Cabanis and Heine (= Thamnophilus, part, of Sclater).
    D. plumbeus (Maximilian) I have seen but have not now at hand, and therefore can not verify my impression that it is congeneric with D. mentalis and allies.
  4. Dysithamnus affinis Pelzeln, Orn. Bras., ii, Abth., 1869, 80, 149 (Villa Maria, Brazil; coll. Vienna Mus.). — D[ysithamnus] a[ffinis] affinis Hellmayr, Novit. Zool., xiii, Feb., 1906, 32, in text (crit.); Dysithamnus affinis affinis Hellmayr, Novit. Zool., XV, 1908, 69 (Faz. Esperanza, Brazil; crit.). — Dysithamnus olivaceus (not Thamnophilus olivaceus Tschudi) Sclater, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., xv, 1890, 222, excl. syn. part. — Dysithamnus mentalis (not Myothera mentalis Temminck) Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. N. H., V, 1893, 118, excl. syn. (Chapada, Matto-Grosso, Brazil; crit.).
  5. Myothera mentalis Temminck, Pl. Col., ii, livr. 30, Jan., 1823, text to pl. 179, fig. 3 (Brazil; coll. Vienna Mus.). — Daysthamnus mentalis Burmeister, Syst. Ueb. Th. Bras., iii, 1856, 82. — Dysithamnus mentalis Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1858, 221, part; Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., xv, 1890, 221; Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. N. H., ii, 1889, 250. — D[ysithamnus] mentalis mentalis Hellmayr, Novit. Zool., xiii, Feb., 1906, 32, in text (crit.). — M[yiothera] poliocephala Maximilian, Beitr. Naturg. Bras.,' iii, pt. ii, 1831, 1098 (s. e. Brazil; type now in coll. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist.)
  6. Dysithamnus mentalis oberi Ridgway, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., xxi, Oct. 20, 1908, 193 (Tobago; coll. U. S. Nat. Mus.).
  7. Dysithamnus semicinereus Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1855, 90, 147, pl. 97 (Bogotá, Colombia; coll. P. L. Sclater); Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., xv, 1890, 221, part. — D[ysithamnus] mentalis semicinereus Ridgway, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., xxi, Oct. 20, 1908, 193, in text.
  8. Dysithamnus affinis andrei' Hellmayr, Novit. Zool., xiii, Feb., 1906, 31 (Caparo, Trinidád; coll. Tring Mus.). — Dysithamnus mentalis spodionotus (not D. spodionotus Salvin and Godman) Chapman, Bull. Am. Mus., N. H., vi, 1894, 50 (Trinidád).
  9. Dysithamnus spodionotus Salvin and Godman, Ibis, 5th ser., ii, April, 1883, 211 (Roraima, Brit. Guiana; coll. Salvin and Godman). — D[ysithamnus] a[ffinis] spodionotus Hellmayr, Novit. ZooL, xiii, Feb., 1906, 32.
  10. Adult females of D. m. mentalis and D. m. spodionotus not seen by me.
  11. See page 54.
  12. Fifteen epecimens.
  13. Fifteen specimens.
    Locality. Wing. Tail. Culmen. Tarsus. Middle
    toe.
    males.
    Three adult males from Guatemala 58.5 37.8 14.8 18.7 11.2
    Ten adult males from Costa Rica 60.6 39.4 14.6 19.5 11.4
    Two adult males from Panamá (Chiriquí and Verágua) 59.2 39.5 14.2 18.5 11.2
    Four adult males (D. m. semicinereus) from Colombia 65.4 42.4 15 19.7 11.7
    One adult male (D. m. semicinereus) from Venezuela 64 41 14.5 18.5 11.5
    Five adult males (D. m. andrei) from Trinidád 61 41 15 19 11.3
    One adult male (D. m. oberi) from Tobago 64.5 44 15 20 11.5
    One adult male (D. m. spodionotus) from British Guiana 62.5 44.5 13.5 20.5 12.5
    Two adult males (D. m. mentalis) from southern Brazil 58.2 43.3 13 19 11
    Ten adult males of D. affinis from southwestern Brazil 62.4 40.7 14.9 19.8 12.1
    females.
    Three adult females from Guatemala 56.3 36.8 14.7 18.5 10.8
    Ten adult females from Costa Rica 60.1 39.1 15 19.6 11.1
    Two adult females from western Panamá (Verágua and Chiriquí) 59.2 38.7 14.5 19 11.2
    Five adult females (D. m. semicinereus) from Colombia 61.2 39.5 14.9 19.9 11.4
    One adult female (D. m. andrei) from Trinidád 59 35.5 16 18 11.5
    Six adult females of D. affinis from southwestern Brazil 61.2 40.6 14.7 19.5 11.6
  14. Two specimens.
  15. Two specimens.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 M. A. Carriker, jr., on labels.
  17. Ten specimens.
  18. Ten specimens.