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Captain Cook's Journal During His First Voyage Round the World/Chapter 11


CHAPTER 11. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE TO ENGLAND.Edit

[April 1771.]

TUESDAY, 16th. At 2 o'clock in the P.M. saw a large Ship behind the Island, under French Colours, standing into Table Bay; at 3 weigh'd with a Light breeze at South-East, and put to Sea; at 4 departed this Life Mr. Robert Molineux Master, a young man of good parts, but had unfortunately given himself up to Extravagancy and intemperance, which brought on disorders that put a Period to his Life. At 6 we had the Table Mountain and the Penguin Island in one bearing South-South-East, distant from the latter about 4 or 5 Leagues; had it calm most part of the night. In the morning a light breeze sprung up Southerly, with which we steer'd North-West; at noon we were by Observation in Latitude 33 degrees 30 minutes South. The Table Mountain bore South 54 degrees East, distant 14 Leagues. N.B. The Table Mountain lies directly over the Cape Town, from which last I take my departure; it lies in the Latitude of 33 degrees 56 minutes South, and Longitude 341 degrees 37 minutes West from Greenwich.

Wednesday, 17th. Fresh breezes and fair weather, with a swell from the South-West. Wind Southerly; course North 50 degrees West; distance 118 miles; latitude 32 degrees 14 minutes South, longitude 344 degrees 8 minutes West.

Thursday, 18th. Gentle breezes and clear weather. Swell as before. Wind Ditto; course North-West; distance 85 miles; latitude 31 degrees 14 minutes South, longitude 345 degrees 19 minutes West.

Friday, 19th. Little wind and Sometimes calm. Swell from the Southward. Wind South-East to North-West; course North 50 degrees West; distance 16 miles; latitude 31 degrees 14 minutes South, longitude 345 degrees 33 minutes West.

Saturday, 20th. Gentle breezes and Clear weather. Wind Westerly; latitude 29 degrees 40 minutes South, longitude 346 degrees 10 minutes West.

Sunday, 21st. A moderate trade wind and Pleasant weather. Wind Southerly; course North 54 degrees West; distance 100 miles; latitude 28 degrees 43 minutes South, longitude 347 degrees 42 minutes West.

Monday, 22nd. A Fresh Trade, and Pleasant weather. Exercised the People at Small Arms. Observations for Longitude with the Sun and Moon agree with the Log. Wind South-East; course North 50 degrees West; distance 118 miles; latitude 27 degrees 27 minutes South, longitude 349 degrees 24 minutes West.

Tuesday, 23rd. Gentle breezes, and Clear weather. Found the Variation in the Evening, by the Amplitude, to be 17 degrees 40 minutes West, and by Azimuth in the Morning 18 degrees 37 minutes. Employ'd repairing Boats and Sails. Exercis'd Great Guns and Small Arms. Wind South-East by South to West-South-West; course North 46 degrees West; distance 98 miles; latitude 26 degrees 19 minutes South, longitude 350 degrees 42 minutes West.

Wednesday, 24th. Ditto weather. Found the Variation to be 17 degrees 30 minutes West. Employ'd as yesterday. Wind West, West-North-West; course North 20 degrees West; distance 78 miles; latitude 25 degrees 6 minutes South, longitude 351 degrees 16 minutes West.

Thursday, 25th. First part, moderate and Clear; Middle, Squally, with Rain; Latter, fresh Gales and Cloudy. Employ'd as above. Wind North-West, South-West; course North 20' West; distance 105 miles; latitude 23 degrees 28 minutes South, longitude 351 degrees 52 minutes West.

Friday, 26th. Fresh Gales, and a large Swell from the Southward. Wind South-South-West, South-East by South; course North 50 degrees West; distance 168 miles; latitude 21 degrees 40 minutes South, longitude 354 degrees 12 minutes West.

Saturday, 27th. Fresh Gales and Cloudy. Employ'd repairing Sails. Wind South-East 1/2 South; course North 55 degrees West; distance 168 miles; latitude 20 degrees 4 minutes South, longitude 356 degrees 40 minutes West.

Sunday, 28th. Ditto weather. Variation per Azimuth 14 degrees West. Wind South-East; course North 56 degrees 30 minutes West; distance 152 miles; latitude 18 degrees 41 minutes South, longitude 358 degrees 54 minutes West.

Monday, 29th. Ditto Gales. Variation 13 degrees 53 minutes West. In the A.M. crossed the line of our first Meridian, viz., that of Greenwich, having now Circumnavigated the Globe in a West direction. Wind South-East; course North 53 degrees West; distance 136 miles; latitude 17 degrees 19 minutes South, longitude 0 degrees 50 minutes West.

Tuesday, 30th. Fresh Gales and Pleasant weather. Exercised the people at Great Guns and Small Arms. Wind South-East; course North 58 degrees West South, distance 126 miles; latitude 16 degrees 11 minutes South, longitude 2 degrees 42 minutes West.

[May 1771. At St. Helena.]

Wednesday, May 1st. Fresh Trade and Pleasant weather. At 6 A.M. saw the Island of St. Helena bearing West, distant 8 or 9 Leagues. At Noon Anchor'd in the Road, before James's Fort, in 24 fathoms water. Found riding here His Majesty's Ship Portland and Swallow[1] Sloop, and 12 Sail of Indiaman. At our first seeing the Fleet in this Road we took it for granted that it was a War; but in this we were soon agreeably deceived. The Europa Indiaman Anchor'd here a little before us; she sail'd from the Cape 2 days after us, and brings an account the French Ship we saw standing into Table Bay was a French Man of War, of 64 Guns, bound to India, and that there were 2 more on their Passage. Wind South-East. At noon at Anchor in St. Helena Road.

Thursday, 2nd. Clear, Pleasant weather. In the P.M. moor'd with the Kedge Anchor, and in the A.M. received some few Officers' stores from the Portland. Wind Ditto. At noon at Anchor in St. Helena Road.

Friday, 3rd. Clear, Pleasant weather. Employ'd repairing Sails, overhauling the Rigging, etc. Wind South-East. At noon at Anchor in St. Helena Road.

Saturday, 4th. Little wind and pleasant weather. At 6 A.M. the Portland made the Signal to unmoor, and at Noon to Weigh, at which time the Ships began to get under Sail. Wind Ditto. At noon at Anchor in St. Helena Road.

Sunday, 5th. Gentle breezes and Clear weather. At 1 P.M. weigh'd, and stood out of the Road in company with the Portland and 12 Sail of Indiamen. At 6 o'clock James Fort, St. Helena, bore East 1/2 South, distant 3 Leagues. In the A.M. found the Variation to be 13 degrees 10 minutes West. Wind East by South; course North 50 degrees 30 minutes West; distance 71 miles; latitude 15 degrees 5 minutes South, longitude 6 degrees 46 minutes West.

Monday, 6th. Moderate breezes and Cloudy weather. Sailing in Company with the Fleet. Wind East-South-East; course North 47 1/2 degrees West; distance 122 miles; latitude 13 degrees 42 minutes South, longitude 8 degrees 27 minutes West.

Tuesday, 7th. Ditto Weather. In the A.M. found the Variation to be 12 degrees 5 minutes West. Exercised the people at Great Guns and Small Arms. Wind South-East; course North 46 degrees West; distance 137 miles; latitude 12 degrees 5 minutes South, longitude 10 degrees 9 minutes West.

Wednesday, 8th. A Steady breeze and Pleasant Weather. All the Fleet in Company. Wind South-East; course North 46 degrees 45 minutes West; distance 126 miles; latitude 10 degrees 39 minutes South, longitude 11 degrees 42 minutes West.

Thursday, 9th. Ditto Weather. In the Evening found the Variation to be 11 degrees 42 minutes West. Wind South-East by South; course North-West; distance 118 miles; latitude 9 degrees 16 minutes, longitude 13 degrees 17 minutes West.

Friday, 10th. At 6 in the A.M. saw the Island of Ascention bearing North-North-West, distant 7 Leagues. Made the Signal to speak with the Portland, and soon after Captain Elliott himself came on board, to whom I deliver'd a Letter for the Admiralty, and a Box containing the Ship's Common Log Books, and some of the Officers' Journals, etc. I did this because it seem'd probable that the Portland would get home before us, as we sail much heavier than any of the Fleet.[2] At Noon the Island of Ascention bore East by South, distant 4 or 5 Leagues. By our Observations it lies in the Latitude of 7 degrees 54 minutes South, and Longitude of 14 degrees 18 minutes West. A North-West by North course by Compass, or North-West a little Westerly by the Globe from St. Helena, will bring you directly to this I sland. Wind Ditto; course North-West; distance 120 miles; latitude 7 degrees 51 minutes South, longitude 14 degrees 32 minutes West.

Friday, 11th. A steady Trade wind and pleasant Weather. At 1/2 past 6 p.m. the Island of Ascention bore South-East 3/4 East, distant 11 or 12 Leagues. Sailing in Company with the Fleet. Wind Ditto; course North 42 degrees West, distance 117 miles; latitude 6 degrees 24 minutes South, longitude 15 degrees 51 minutes West.

Saturday, 12th. First and Middle parts a Steady breeze, and fair the Latter; light Squalls, with rain. Wind South-East by South to South-East by East; course North 31 degrees 15 minutes West; distance 123 miles; latitude 4 degrees 38 minutes South, longitude 16 degrees 54 minutes West.

Sunday, 13th. Gentle breezes and Clear Weather; hott and Sultry. Sailing in Company with the fleet. Variation 10 degrees West. Wind South-East by South; course North 32 1/2 degrees West; distance 119 miles; latitude 2 degrees 58 minutes South, longitude 17 degrees 58 minutes West.

Monday, 14th. Ditto Weather. Wind South-East by South; course North 32 1/2 degrees West; distance 109 miles; latitude 1 degree 26 minutes South, longitude 18 degrees 57 minutes West.

Tuesday, 15th. Little wind and hot, Sultry weather. In the P.M. observed, meerly for the sake of Observing, an Eclipse of the Sun. In the A.M. brought another Foretopsail to the Yard, the old one being quite wore out. Wind East-South-East; course North 32 1/2 degrees West; distance 85 miles; latitude 0 degrees 14 minutes South, longitude 19 degrees 43 minutes West.

Wednesday, 16th. Light breezes and fair weather. Variation 9 degrees 30 minutes West. Wind South-East by South; course North 31 degrees West; distance 71 miles; latitude 0 degrees 47 minutes North, longitude 20 degrees 20 minutes West.

Thursday, 17th. Ditto Weather. Sailing in Company with the Fleet. Wind Ditto; course North 31 degrees West; distance 61 miles; latitude 1 degree 39 minutes North, longitude 20 degrees 50 minutes West.

Saturday, 18th. First part ditto weather; remainder Squally, with Thunder and Rain. The observ'd Latitude is 14 Miles to the Northward of the Log. Sailing in Company with the Fleet. Wind South-South-East to East; course North 20 degrees West; distance 86 miles; latitude 3 degrees 0 minutes North, longitude 21 degrees 22 minutes West.

Sunday, 19th. Cloudy, unsettled weather, with some rain. In the A.M. found the Variation by the Amplitude and Azimuth 7 degrees 40 minutes West. Hoisted a Boat out, and sent on board the Houghton for the Surgeon, Mr. Carret, in order to look at Mr. Hicks, who is so far gone in a Consumption that his Life is dispair'd of. Observation at Noon 16 Miles to the Northward of the Log. Wind South-East to South by East; course North 20 degrees West; distance 98 miles; latitude 4 degrees 32 minutes North, longitude 21 degrees 58 minutes West.

[With India Fleet. Homeward Bound.]

Monday, 20th. Dark, cloudy, unsettled weather, with rain. At Noon the Observ'd Latitude was 27 Miles to the Northward of the Log. Sailing in Company with the Fleet. Wind Variable between the South and East; course North 19 degrees West; distance 70 miles; latitude 5 degrees 38 minutes North, longitude 22 degrees 21 minutes West.

Tuesday, 21st. Little wind, with some heavy showers of rain. At 2 p.m. had some Observations of the Sun and Moon, which gave the Longitude 24 degrees 50 minutes West, 2 degrees 28 minutes West of Account. In the morning it was Calm, and the Ships, being near one another, several of them had their Boats out to tow. We Observed the Portland to carry out a long Warp. I, being desirous to see the Machine they made use of, we hoisted out a Boat, and Mr. Banks, Dr. Solander, and myself went on board her, where we was show'd it. It was made of Canvas, in every respect like an Umbrello; its Circumference, if extended to a Circle, was 24 feet, tho' this was a Small one of the Sort; yet Captain Elliot told me that it would hold as much as 150 Men could haul. I was so well satisfied of the Utility of this Machine that I would not have delayed a moment in having one Made had not our Forge been render'd Useless by the loss of some of its parts. Winds Variable; course North 31 degrees West; distance 35 miles; latitude 6 degrees 8 minutes North, longitude 25 degrees 8 minutes West.

Wednesday, 22nd. Variable, unsettled weather, with rain. About 9 o'clock in the A.M. the Portland shorten'd Sail for the Sternmost Ships to come up. As we imagin'd, this gave us an Opportunity to get a Head of the Fleet, after which we made such sail as was necessary to keep in Company. Wind Variable; course North-North-West 3/4 West; distance 58 miles; latitude 6 degrees 58 minutes North, longitude 25 degrees 38 minutes West.

Thursday, 23rd. Little wind from the Eastward, with frequent showers of Rain, and hazey weather. The Fleet astern of us all this day. At Noon we Shortned Sail for them to come up, the headmost being about 2 Leagues off. Wind East to North-East; course North 25 degrees West; distance 56 miles; latitude 7 degrees 49 minutes North, longitude 26 degrees 2 minutes West.

Friday, 24th. First part Moderate breezes, and hazey, with rain; the latter, fresh breezes and fair. At 3 p.m., finding the Fleet to come fast up with us, we made all the Sail we could. Soon after it became hazey, and we lost sight of them until near 6, when it clear'd up a little, and we saw 3 Sail abreast of us, bearing East about 2 or 3 Miles' Distance; by this we saw that they not only kept a better wind, but out sail'd us upon a wind. It became again hazey, and we lost Sight of them, and notwithstanding we keept close upon a wind all night, with as much Sail out as we could bear, there was not one Sail in sight in the Morning. Wind North-East and North-North-East; course North 54 degrees West; distance 92 miles; latitude 8 degrees 42 minutes North, 27 degrees 18 minutes West.

Saturday, 25th. Moderate Trade Wind and Cloudy weather. Wind North-North-East; course North 50 degrees 15 minutes West; distance 92 miles; latitude 9 degrees 41 minutes North, longitude 28 degrees 30 minutes West.

Sunday, 26th. A Steady Trade and Cloudy Weather. About 1 o'Clock P.M. departed this Life Lieutenant Hicks, and in the Evening his body was committed to the Sea with the usual ceremonys. He died of a Consumption which he was not free from when we sail'd from England, so that it may be truly said that he hath been dying ever since, tho' he held out tolerable well un til we got to Batavia. Wind North-East by North; course North 46 degrees West; distance 92 miles; latitude 20 degrees 47 minutes North, longitude 29 degrees 35 minutes West.

Monday, 27th. A Steady, fresh Trade and Cloudy weather. This day I gave Mr. Charles Clerk an order to act as Lieutenant in the room of Mr. Hicks, deceased, he being a Young Man extremely well qualified for that Station. Wind North-East; course North 39 degrees West; distance 103 miles; latitude 12 degrees 7 minutes North, longitude 30 degrees 40 minutes West.

Tuesday, 28th. A steady Trade and fair weather. Wind North Easterly; course North 40 degrees West; distance 108 miles; latitude 13 degrees 30 minutes North, longitude 31 degrees 51 minutes West.

Wednesday, 29th. Fresh Gales and Hazey. Wind Ditto; course North 31 1/2 degrees West; distance 128 miles; latitude 15 degrees 19 minutes North, longitude 33 degrees 2 minutes West.

Thursday, 30th. Ditto Gales and Cloudy. Fix'd a new maintopmast Backstay, the old one having broke several times. Wind Ditto; course North 31 degrees 15 minutes West; distance 124 miles; latitude 17 degrees 5 minutes North, longitude 34 degrees 9 minutes West.

Friday, 31st. Strong Gales and Cloudy in the Evening. Got down Top Gallant Yards, and in the Morning found the Variation 5 degrees 9 minutes West. Wind North-East and North-East by East; course North 39 1/2 degrees West; distance 136 miles; latitude 18 degrees 50 minutes North, longitude 35 degrees 40 minutes West.

[June 1771.]

Saturday, June 1st. Fresh Trade, and Cloudy weather. In the A.M. got up Top Gallant Yards. Wind North-East; course North 35 degrees West; distance 100 miles; latitude 20 degrees 12 minutes North, longitude 36 degrees 41 minutes West.

Sunday, 2nd. Moderate Gales and Clear weather. Variation 5 degrees 4 minutes West. Wind North-East to North-North-East; course North 49 degrees West; distance 104 miles; latitude 21 degrees 20 minutes North, longitude 38 degrees 5 minutes West.

Monday, 3rd. A Gentle Trade Wind, and Pleasant weather. Wind North-East; course North 44 degrees West; distance 85 miles; latitude 22 degrees 21 minutes North, longitude 39 degrees 9 minutes West.

Tuesday, 4th. Ditto weather. In the A.M. found the Variation to be 4 degrees 30 minutes West. Wind North-East; course North 34 degrees West; distance 91 miles; latitude 23 degrees 40 North, longitude 40 degrees 4 minutes West.

Wednesday, 5th. Gentle breezes, with some Showers of Small Rain. Wind Ditto; course North 52 degrees West; distance 83 miles; latitude 24 degrees 31 minutes North, longitude 41 degrees 11 minutes West.

Thursday, 6th. Ditto weather. In the A.M. found the Variation by the mean of the Amplitude and Azimuth to be 5 degrees 34 minutes West, and by Observation of the Sun and Moon found the Ship in Longitude 43 degrees 18 minutes West of Greenwich, 2 degrees 51 minutes West of the Log since the last Observations; this I judge to be owing to a Westerly Current. Wind East-North-East to East; course North 3/4 West; distance 90 miles; latitude 26 degrees 1 minute North, longitude, per Observation Sun and Moon, 43 degrees 18 minutes West.

Friday, 7th. Moderate breezes, and Cloudy. A.M., Variation per mean of 20 Azimuths 5 degrees 20 minutes West. Wind East-North-East; course North 15 degrees West; distance 84 miles; latitude 27 degrees 22 minutes North, longitude 43 degrees 42 minutes West.

Saturday, 8th. Moderate breezes and Pleasant weather. In the A.M. found the Variation to be 5 degrees 24 minutes West. By the Observation of the Sun and Moon the Longitude of the Ship at Noon was 43 degrees 42 minutes West. Wind Easterly; course North; distance 88 miles; latitude 28 degrees 50 minutes North, longitude 43 degrees 42 minutes West.

Sunday, 9th. Clear, pleasant weather and a Smooth Sea. In the A.M. found the Variation to be 7 degrees 33 minutes West. Some Tropick birds flying about the Ship; we have seen of these birds every day since we passed the Tropick. Wind Ditto; course North by West 1/2 West; distance 81 miles; latitude 30 degrees 11 minutes North, longitude 44 degrees 9 minutes West.

Monday, 10th. Little wind and Clear weather. Exercised the people at Small Arms. Wind Ditto; course North 30 degrees West; distance 71 miles; latitude 31 degrees 12 minutes North, longitude 44 degrees 50 minutes West.

Tuesday, 11th. Ditto weather. A Smooth Sea. Wind North-East by East; course North 18 minutes West; distance 67 miles; latitude 32 degrees 16 North, longitude 45 degrees 14 minutes West.

Wednesday, 12th. Light breezes and clear weather. Variation by the Amplitude in the Evening 7 degrees 0 minutes West, and by Azimuth in the Morning 6 degrees 55 minutes West. Exercised Great Guns and Small Arms. Wind East by South; course North-North-East; distance 48 miles; latitude 33 degrees 8 minutes North, longitude 44 degrees 53 minutes West.

Thursday, 13th. Little wind and pleasant weather. Found the Variation by the Amplitude in the Evening to be 8 degrees 23 minutes; in the Morning 8 degrees 15 minutes, and by Azimuth soon after 8 degrees 14 minutes West. Wind Ditto; Course North by East 1/2 East; distance 77 miles; latitude 34 degrees 14 minutes North, longitude 44 degrees 25 minutes West.

Friday, 14th. A Gentle Gale, and pleasant weather. In the A.M. saw 2 Turtle laying a Sleep upon the water. Wind East-South-East; course North 18 degrees East; distance 99 miles; latitude 35 degrees 48 minutes North, longitude 43 degrees 48 minutes West.

Saturday, 15th. Ditto Weather at Daylight. In the Morning saw a Sloop to Windward standing to the Eastward, which we run out of sight by Noon. Wind South-East; course North-East 1/2 East; distance 119 miles; latitude 37 degrees 2 minutes North, longitude 41 degrees 54 minutes West.

Sunday, 16th. A Steady breeze and pleasant weather, with some rain in the Night. At daylight in the Morning saw a Sail a head, which we came up and spoke with a little after 10 o'clock. She proved a Portoguee Ship from Rio de Janeiro, bound to Lisbon. Wind Ditto; course North-East 1/2 East; distance 119 miles; latitude 38 degrees 18 minutes North, longitude 40 degrees 38 minutes West.

Monday, 17th. Steady, Gentle Gales and pleasant weather. Variation in the Evening 9 degrees West. Wind South-South-East; course North 68 degrees East; distance 104 miles; latitude 38 degrees 57 minutes North, longitude 38 degrees 36 minutes West.

Tuesday, 18th. Little wind, and clear weather. At 2 p.m. found the Ship to be by Observation 1 degree 22 minutes to the Westward of Account carried on from the last Observation; in the Eveni ng the Variation was 14 degrees 15 minutes West, and in the Morning 14 degrees 24 minutes. Wind South; course North 66 degrees East; distance 82 miles; latitude 39 degrees 52 minutes North, longitude 36 degrees 59 minutes West.

Wednesday, 19th. Fresh Gales and Cloudy. At 2 p.m. found by observation the same Error in our Longitude as Yesterday, which I have now corrected. The Longitude of this day is that resulting from Observation. At 10 A.M. saw a Sail a head, which we soon came up with, and sent a Boat on board. She was a Schooner from Rhoad Island out upon the Whale fishery. From her we learnt that all was peace in Europe, and that the America Disputes were made up; to confirm this the Master said that the Coat on his back was made in old England. Soon after leaving this Vessel we spoke another from Boston, and saw a third, all out on the same account. Wind South to South-West; course North 73 degrees East; distance 127 miles; latitude 40 degrees 9 minutes North, longitude 36 degrees 44 minutes West.

Thursday, 20th. Fresh Gales and Cloudy, with some Showers of rain. At day light in the Morning saw a Sail ahead standing to the East. A Swell from the North-North-West. Wind South-West, North-West, North; course North 80 1/2 degrees East; distance 121 miles; latitude 40 degrees 29 minutes North, longitude 33 degrees 10 minutes West.

Friday, 21st. Fresh Gales and Cloudy. In the P.M. saw a Sail astern standing to the South-East, and at 11 o'Clock A.M. saw from the Mast head 13 Sail of Stout Ships, which we took to be the East India Fleet. Wind Northerly; course East by North; distance 128 miles; latitude 40 degrees 33 minutes North, longitude 30 degrees 20 minutes West.

Saturday, 22nd. Fresh Gales, with Squalls, attended with rain. In the Evening had 14 Sail in sight, 13 upon our lee Quarter, and a Snow upon our lee Bow. In the Night split both Topgallant Sails so much that they were obliged to be unbent to repair. In the Morning the Carpenter reported the Maintopmast to be Sprung in the Cap, which we supposed hapned in the P.M., when both the Weather Backstays broke. Our Rigging and Sails are now so bad that something or another is giving way every day. At Noon had 13 Sail in sight, which we are well assured are the India Fleet, and are all now upon our Weather Quarter. Wind North to North-East; course North 81 degrees East; distance 114 miles; latitude 41 degrees 11 minutes, longitude 27 degrees 52 minutes West.

Sunday, 23rd. Fresh Gales and Squally, attended with Showers of rain. In the Evening all the Fleet were to Windward of us, and in the Morning not one was to be seen. Wind North-East by North to East-North-East; course South 69 1/2 degrees East; distance 80 miles; latitude 40 degrees 43 minutes North, longitude 26 degrees 13 minutes West.

Monday, 24th. First part, moderate breezes; remainder, Squally. At Noon Tack'd. Wind North-East to East-South-East; course South 82 degrees East; distance 64 miles; latitude 40 degrees 34 minutes North, longitude 24 degrees 49 minutes West.

Tuesday, 25th. First part and remainder a fresh breeze and Cloudy. Wind North-East to North-North-East; course South 85 degrees East; distance 58 miles; latitude 40 degrees 39 minutes North, longitude 23 degrees 33 minutes West.

Wednesday, 26th. First part, breezes; remainder, little wind. Wind North by East; course North 86 degrees 45 minutes East; distance 72 miles; latitude 40 degrees 43 minutes North, longitude 21 degrees 58 minutes West.

Thursday, 27th. Moderate breezes and Cloudy weather. Wind Westerly; course North 54 minutes East; distance 54 miles; latitude 41 degrees 14 minutes North, longitude 20 degrees 59 minutes West.

Friday, 28th. Fresh breezes, with Showers of Rain. Wind West to North-North-West; course North 38 degrees East; distance 123 miles; latitude 42 degrees 55 minutes North, longitude 19 degrees 18 minutes West.

Saturday, 29th. First part, little wind; remainder, Fresh Gales and Squally, with Showers of Rain. Wind South-West to West and North-East; course North 59 degrees 15 minutes East; distance 86 miles; latitude 43 degrees 39 minutes North, longitude 17 degrees 36 minutes West.

Sunday, 30th. Gentle breezes and fair weather. Variation in the Evening 18 degrees 30 minutes West, and in the Morning 19 degrees 30 minutes. Wind Northerly; course North 50 degrees 45 minutes East; distance 87 miles; latitude 44 degrees 34 minutes North, longitude 16 degrees 2 minutes West.

[July 1771.]

Monday, July 1st. Ditto weather. In the Night passed 2 Sail Standing to the South-West. Wind Ditto; course North 77 degrees 15 minutes East; distance 90 miles; latitude 44 degrees 54 minutes North, longitude 13 degrees 59 minutes West.

Tuesday, 2nd. Little wind and Cloudy, hazey weather. One Sail in Sight to the North-East. Wind Ditto; course East; distance 42 miles; latitude 45 degrees 54 minutes North, longitude 13 degrees 2 minutes West.

Wednesday, 3rd. Little wind and pleasant weather. At 9 A.M. found the Ship by Observation of the Sun and Moon 1 degree 14 minutes East of Account. Six Sail in Sight. Wind North and North-West; course North 56 degrees East; distance 54 miles; latitude 45 degrees 24 minutes North, longitude 11 degrees 59 minutes West per Log, 10 degrees 45 minutes per Observation.

Thursday, 4th. Gentle breezes and Cloudy weather. Variation per Azimuth and Amplitude in the Evening 21 degrees 25 1/2 West, and in the Morning 20 degrees 10 minutes West. Wind West, North, and North-East; course South 85 degrees East; distance 55 miles; latitude 45 degrees 29 minutes North, longitude 10 degrees 44 minutes West per Log, 9 degrees 27 minutes per Observation.

Friday, 5th. Little wind and Cloudy. At 1 P.M. spoke a Dutch Galliot bound to Riga. At 5 Tack't, and stood to the Westward till 8 a.m., then to the Eastward. Wind North-East; course North 50 degrees East; distance 8 miles; latitude 45 degrees 34 minutes North, longitude 10 degrees 32 minutes West per Log, 9 degrees 18 minutes per Observation.

Saturday, 6th. Gentle breezes and Cloudy. At 1 p.m. sent a Boat on board a Brig belonging to Boston, last from Gibraltar, and bound to Falmouth. Wind North-North-East; course North 72 degrees 30 minutes East; distance 37 miles; latitude 44 degrees 45 minutes North, longitude 9 degrees 42 minutes West per Log, 8 degrees 28 minutes per Observation.

Sunday, 7th. Gentle breezes and Clear weather. In the Evening found the Variation by the Amplitude to be 22 degrees 30 minutes West. At 9 A.M. Spoke a Brig from Liverpool bound to Porto, and some time after another from London, bound to the Granades. She had been 3 days from Scilly, and reckoned herself in the Longitude of about 10 minutes West, which was about 40 minutes to the Westward of what we found ourselves to-day by Observation. We learnt from this Vessel that no account had been received in England from us, and that Wagers were held that we were lost. It seems highly improbable that the Letters sent by the Dutch Ships from Batavia should not come to hand, as it is now 5 months since these Ships sail'd from the Cape of Good Hope. Wind North-North-East and North-West; course North 50 degrees East; distance 49 miles; latitude 46 degrees 16 minutes North, longitude 9 degrees 39 minutes West per Account, 9 degrees 29 minutes per Observation.

Monday, 8th. Little wind and hazey weather. Swell from the Northward. Wind North-North-West to South-West; course North 46 degrees 45 minutes East; distance 43 miles; latitude 46 degrees 45 minutes North, longitude 8 degrees 54 minutes West.

Tuesday, 9th. Fore and middle parts a Gentle breeze, and thick, Foggy weather; remainder, a fresh Breeze and Cloudy. A swell from the North-North-West all day. Wind South Westerly; course North 21 degrees East; distance 100 miles; latitude 48 degrees 19 minutes North, longitude 8 degrees 1 minute West per Account, 8 degrees 7 minutes per Observation.

Wednesday, 10th. Pleasant breezes and Clear weather. At 6 o'Clock in the Morning sounded, and Struck ground in 60 fathoms Shells and Stones, by which I judged we were the length of Scilly Isles. At Noon we saw land from the Mast Head, bearing North, which we judged to be about the Land's End. Soundings 54 fathoms, Coarse, Grey Sand. Wind Westerly; course North 44 degrees East; distance 97 miles; latitude 49 degrees 29 minutes North, longitude 6 degrees 18 minutes West.

Friday, 11th. Steady fresh breezes and clear weather. At 2 in the P.M. saw the Lizardland, and at 6 o'clock the lighthouse bore North-West, distant 5 Leagues, we being at this time, by my reckoning, in the Longitude of 5 degrees 30 minutes West; soon after 2 Ships under their Topsails between us and the land, which we took for Men of War. At 7 o'clock in the morning the Start Point bore North-West by North, distant 3 Leagues, and at Noon we reckon'd ourselves about 5 Leagues short of Portland. This Forenoon a small cutter built vessel came under our Stern, and inquir'd after the India Fleet, which, they said, they were cruizing for and had not seen.

Friday, 12th. Winds at South-West, a fresh Gale, with which we run briskly up Channel. At 1/2 past 3 p.m. passed the Bill of Portland, and at 7 Peverell Point; at 6 a.m. passed Beachy head at the distance of 4 or 5 miles; at 10 Dungeness, at the distance of 2 miles, and at Noon we were abreast of Dover.

Saturday, 13th. At 3 o'clock in the P.M. anchor'd in the Downs, and soon after I landed in order to repair to London.

(Signed) JAMs COOK.

POSTCRIPT.

I HAVE made mention in Book 1st,[3] page 76, of 2 Spanish Ships touching at Georges Island some months before our Arrival there. Upon our arrival at Batavia we were inform'd that 2 French Ships, commanded by the Sieur de Bougainville, had put in there about 2 years before us in their way home from the South Seas. We were told many Circumstances relating to the 2 Ships, all tending to prove beyond a doubt that they were the same 2 as were at George's Island as above mentioned, which we then conjectur'd to be Spaniards, being lead into that mistake by the Spanish Iron, etc., we saw among the Natives, and by Toobouratomita pitching upon the Colours of that Nation for those they wore, in which he might very easily be mistaken; but as to the Iron, etc., there might be no mistake, for we were told that either one or both of these Ships had put into the River de la Plata, where they disposed of all their European goods brought for that purpose, and purchased others to Trade with the Islanders in the South Sea; and I think we were told that they also touched upon the Spanish Main in the South Sea. As a proof of their having been trading with the Spaniards, Bougainville's Ship had on board a great Quantity of Spanish Dollars at the time she arrived at and left Batavia, some days after our arrival at the Cape of Good Hope. I was told by some French Officers, lately come from the Island Mauritius, that Orette, the Native of George's Island which Bougainville brought away with him, was now at the Maritius, and that they were going to fit out a Ship to carry him to his Native country, where they intend to make a Settlement; 100 Troops for that purpose were to go out in the same Ship. This account is confirmed by a French Gentleman we have on board, who has very lately been at the Maritius.[4] As I have no reason to doubt the truth of this account, it leads me to consider the rout that this Ship must take, which I think can be no other than that of Tasmans as far as the Coast of New Zeland; and if she fall in with that Coast to the Southward of Cape Farewell will very probably put into Admiralty Bay, or Queen Charlotte's sound, as Tasman's track will in some measure point out to her one or the other of these places. I think it is not likely she will venture through the Strait, even suppose she discovers it, but will follow Tasman's Track to the North Cape, where no doubt she will leave him, and follow the direction of the Coast to the South-East, as it will not be out of her way; by which means she will fall in with the most fertile part of that Country, and as they cannot know anything of the Endeavour's voyage, they will not hesitate a moment to declare themselves the first discoverers. Indeed, I cannot see how they can think otherwise, unless the Natives inform them to the contrary, which they may not choose to understand. The French Officers before spoke of would not allow that George's Island was first discover'd by the Dolphin, though no doubt Bougainville did; but it was not for the Interest of his Country, nor perhaps his own, to own it. Thus this Island, though of little value, may prove a Bone of Contention between the 2 Nations, especially if the French make a Settlement upon it, and the Dolphin's voyage, and this of ours, published by Authority to fix the prior right of discovery beyond disputes.

Now I am upon the Subject of discoveries, I hope it will not be taken amiss if I give it as my opinion that the most feasable method of making further discoveries in the South Sea is to enter it by the way of New Zeland, first touching and refreshing at the Cape of Good Hope; from thence proceed to the Southward of New Holland for Queen Charlotte's Sound, where again refresh Wood and water, taking care to be ready to leave that place by the latter end of September, or beginning of October at farthest, when you would have the whole Summer before you, and after getting through the Strait, might, with the prevailing Westerly Winds, run to the Eastward in as high a Latitude as you please, and if you meet with no lands would have time enough to get round Cape Horne before the Summer was too far spent; but if after meeting with no Continent, and you had other objects in view, then haul to the Northward, and after visiting some of the Islands already discovered, after which proceed with the trade wind back to the Westward in search of those before mentioned — thus the discoveries in the South Sea would be compleat.[5]


  1. This was not the same Swallow that preceded Cook in circumnavigation. She had been broken up.
  2. The Portland and the India fleet got home three days before the Endeavour.
  3. The Journal was written in thin books, afterwards bound together in England. The page given here is of this published copy.
  4. This intention was never carried out.
  5. This programme Cook carried out in his second voyage in the most complete manner possible.