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Drug Themes in Science Fiction/Annotated Bibliography-Contemporary Period

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY


CONTEMPORARY PERIOD

(1965–Present)


Author: Guin, Wyman
Title: Beyond bedlam
In: Living Way Out
Publisher: Avon Books, New York
Pages: 155-208
Date: 1967 (1951 First Issue)
Format: Short novel
Descriptor: Drugs as panaceas
Annotation:During the late 20th century drugs were developed to aid schizophrenics by permitting their warring inner personalities to live side by side, controlling the body alternately. By the following century the element of schizophrenia is recognized in all persons and it becomes mandatory to use the drugs, giving everyone a prime ego and an alternate ego, in fact separate persons, who undergo drug-induced shifts of dominance every five days. The author explores the concept of ego-shift by following the fortunes of a number of protagonists whose doubled personalities engage in complex interactions.




Author: Collins, Hunt (Pseud. of Evan Hunter)
Title: Tomorrow and Tomorrow
Publisher: Pyramid Books, New York
Pages: 190 pp.
Date: 1956
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as reality-testers
Annotation:The novel, set in a near-future Earth dominated by advertising and television, describes the conflict between two groups of differing social philosophies: the Vikes, who advocate vicarious pleasure and indulge in heroin-like narcotics to escape from reality, and the Rees, or Realists, an austere Puritan movement hostile to all mind-altering substances.





Author: Dick, Philip K.
Title: We can remember it for you wholesale
Journal: Fantasy and Science Fiction, Vol. 30, No. 4, 3-16
Publisher: Mercury Press, Inc., New York
Date: April 1966
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-controllers
Annotation:A technique is developed by which, using a hypnotic drug called narkidrine, false memories can be implanted in a human brain. The memory-implant technique can be used to provide the vicarious illusion of pleasurable experience, but also—as the story unfolds—we see that it can be used for purposes of political intrigue.




Author: Dick, Philip K.
Title: The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 278 pp.
Date: 1965
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:An illegal hallucinogen, Can-D, allows Earth colonists on Mars, Venus, and other nearby worlds to stave of the crushing boredom of daily life by permitting them to enter a highly schematicized common fantasy world where they share in the adventures of two imaginary lovers who are larger-than-life Hollywood dream-figures. Complications ensue when a competitive reality-destroying drug, Chew-Z, is introduced surreptitiously by beings from another solar system.





Author: Dick, Philip K.
Title: Now Wait for Last Year
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 214 pp.
Date: 1966
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:In the war-torn world of the 21st century, Americans escape from the horrors of their time by addictive use of JJ-180, a drug that allows the consciousness to detach from present time and return to earlier eras, or even to travel forward in time. The protagonist, initially attempting only to deal with his wife's addiction to the time-travel drug, eventually becomes entangled in global politics and the progress of the interstellar war as he himself, under the influence of JJ-180, oscillates backward and forward in time.




Author: Harrison, Harry
Title: Make Room! Make Room!
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 213 pp.
Date: 1966
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as euphorics
Annotation:The year is 1999 and the population of New York City is 35 million. In this hideously overcrowded society marijuana and LSD are the chief means of escape from stress, and their use is far more pervasive than it is today. Filmed as Soylent Green.





Author: Aldiss, Brian W.
Title: The night that all time broke loose
In: Dangerous Visions (Edited by Harlan Ellison)
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 151-160
Date: 1967
Format: Short story
Descriptors: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Comic story about time gas, piped through mains to suburban houses the way heating gas is distributed. Using time gas, subscribers can dial themselves back to any period in their lives they prefer to re-experience. Story concerns a break in the gas main that floods the region with time gas and touches off a great gusher that carries mankind back into prehistoric times, with dinosaurs imminent as the time-effects grow more powerful.




Author: Anderson, Chester
Title: The Butterfly Kid
Publisher: Pyramid Books, New York
Pages: 190 pp.
Date: 1967
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:In this comic novel, set among the drug-using counter-culturists of Greenwich Village, trouble starts when Reality Pills become available—a "projective hallucinogen" that creates hallucinations visible not only to the user but to those around him. It develops that Reality Pills have been invented and distributed by blue lobster-like beings from another planet in order to facilitate their conquest of Earth—a conquest ultimately thwarted by the dedication of a fearless band of hippies.





Author: Dick, Philip K. and Nelson, Ray
Title: The Ganymede Takeover
Publisher: Ace Books, New York
Pages: 157 pp.
Date: 1967
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:In this satiric novel intelligent worm-like beings from Ganymede, moon of Jupiter, conquer the Earth despite the best efforts of such individuals as Rudolph Balkani, Chief of the Bureau of Psychedelic Research, who has been working on a mind-blocking weapon. The world that Ganymede conquered is in fact devoted on all levels to the use of psychedelics, and the novel raises questions about the nature of "reality" as the action unfolds.




Author: Lupoff, Richard A.
Title: One Million Centuries
Publisher: Lancer Books, New York
Pages: 352 pp.
Date: 1967
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:A man of the twentieth century is thrust forward in time to the world of the unimaginably distant future. As he explores the civilization he finds himself among, he learns that the people of the era habitually chew samra, a hallucinogenic drug, and a woman he meets takes him on a samra trip. It is a soaring visionary experience in which he perceives the birth and death of the solar system.





Author: Spinrad, Norman
Title: Carcinoma angels
In: Dangerous Visions (Edited by Harlan Ellison)
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 489-497
Date: 1967
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Protagonist suffering from terminal cancer seeks remission of disease. With the aid of massive doses of various hallucinogenic agents he reaches an ostensible mental state in which he is capable of entering his own body to do psychic battle with the cancer cell. In series of metaphorical contests he destroys the invaders, but is unable to return to real-world consciousness and is remanded to mental institution, trapped within his own body.




Author: Wilson, Colin
Title: The Mind Parasites
Publisher: Arkham House, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Pages: 222 pp.
Date: 1967
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:A research project involving heavy doses of mescaline and LSD leads to perceptions revealing the existence of invisible "mind parasites," alien invaders who have long controlled and influenced human life. With the aid of the drug, experimenters unleash mental powers with which to combat the invaders.





Author: Disch, Thomas
Title: Camp Concentration
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 184 pp.
Date: 1968
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as intelligence-enhancers
Annotation:The novel is the journal of a U. S. political prisoner of the near future who is assigned to observe and record the progress of an experiment in which volunteer prisoners at a secret internment camp are treated with Pallidine, an intelligence-enhancing drug derived from the organism that causes syphilis. In the course of nine months the drug turns the prisoners into supermen of extraordinary mental capacity while destroying their bodies with disease.




Author: Herbert, Frank
Title: The Santaroga Barrier
Publisher: Berkley Books, New York
Pages: 255 pp.
Date: 1968
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:An outsider penetrates a remote California valley inhabited by reclusive farmers who discourage all contact with strangers. He discovers that they have built a society based on consumption of Jaspers—a psychedelic drug going far beyond acid in its effects, fostering a sense of community through its ability to allow takers to perceive the ultimate relationships linking all aspects of the universe. He is drawn into the valley society and becomes part of it.





Author: Moorcock, Michael
Title: The Final Programme
Publisher: Avon Books, New York
Pages: 191 pp.
Date: 1968
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Satiric comic novel of near future, in which hallucinogenic drugs are used in a variety of ways—as, for example, LSD gas, employed as a protective device and discharged to muddle the minds of burglars breaking into a mansion. More conventional use of drugs (i.e., as euphorics and hallucinogens) is common in the book.




Author: Silverberg, Robert
Title: How it was when the past went away
In: Earth's Other Shadow (By Robert Silverberg)
Publisher: New American Library, New York
Pages: 66-127
Date: 1973 (First Issue 1969)
Format: Short novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-injurers
Annotation:One day in 2003 an unknown malcontent dumps an amnesia-producing drug into the water system of San Francisco. Within a few hours virtually everyone in the city has lost his memory, and the effects of the memory drug linger for several days, causing great complications. Story follows the reactions of several characters to the varied effects of sudden amnesia. As story ends things are returning to normal for most people, but one unstable individual has obtained a supply of the drug and is preaching its use in a new cult of oblivion.





Author: Spinrad, Norman
Title: Bug Jack Barron
Publisher: Walker Books, New York
Pages: 327 pp.
Date: 1969
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:In the closing years of the 20th century the work of a foundation for life-extension research becomes the center of fierce political controversy. The tensions growing out of the search for immortality are depicted against the background of a near-future world in which marijuana and the psychedelic drugs are legal and widely consumed.




Author: Aldiss, Brian W.
Title: Barefoot in the Head
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, New York
Pages: 281 pp.
Date: 1970
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-injurers
Annotation:In Europe of the near future, political tensions have led to the bombing of the entire continent by the Arab state of Kuwait with psychedelic weapons—odorless, tasteless, and enormously potent. In the aftermath of the war all of Europe finds itself on a perpetual LSD trip, since the drug's aftereffects prove ineradicable. Industrial society breaks down, reason becomes extinct, and the novel itself dissolves into a Joycean verbal phantasmagoria as the old society gives way to one in which insanity is the norm.





Author: Silverberg, Robert
Title: Sundance
In: The Cube Root of Uncertainty (By Robert Silverberg)
Publisher: Collier Books, New York
Pages: 219-239
Date: 1970
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Protagonist is part of a team of Earth men annihilating a semi-intelligent alien race on an extrasolar world prior to colonization of the planet. Protagonist is emotionally disturbed—his American Indian ancestry makes him bitter about the genocide he feels is taking place—and his sympathies toward the aliens lead him to take part in their rites and to consume a hallucinogenic plant, used by them, that induces synesthesia and a sense of racial communion.




Author: Vonnegut, Kurt
Title: Welcome to the monkey house
In: Welcome to the Monkey House (By Kurt Vonnegut)
Publisher: Delacorte Press, New York
Pages: 28-47
Date: 1970
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-controllers
Annotation:At a time when the world's population is 17 billion, compulsory ethical birth control comes into effect. On pain of fine, everyone must take birth control pills three times a day. The pills do not interfere with reproduction, but, by making people numb from the waist down, "take every bit of pleasure out of sex."





Author: Benford, James
Title: Pulse
Journal: Fantastic Science Fiction, Vol 20, No. 6, 22-25
Publisher: Ultimate Publishing Company, New York
Date: August 1971
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Young woman describes her LSD trip to her psycho-therapist: a vision of another world (she thinks it is the moon) marked by strange geological formations and flora. He listens patiently to her descriptions of this obviously illusory experience, but she maintains the drug actually transported her, and as she goes on talking he is drawn into the illusion and finds himself mysteriously transported (without the aid of the drug) to the world of her narrative.




Author: Lafferty, R. A.
Title: Sky
In: New Dimensions One, (Edited by Robert Silverberg)
Publisher: Doubleday and Co., New York
Pages: 149-161
Date: 1971
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Protagonists in future civilization make use of Sky, a drug derived from an amanita mushroom. Stated powers of this drug are to provide sensations of mastery and union-with-cosmos, especially during parachute drops. Protagonists attain successively more ecstatic states in series of Sky-enhanced parachute drops, until, seeking the perfect high, they deliberately fail to use their parachutes on one Sky trip and, after a descent marked by moments of stunning ecstasy, perish as they hit the ground.





Author: Panshin, Alexei
Title: How can we sink when we can fly?
In: Four Futures, a science fiction anthology
Publisher: Hawthorn Books, New York
Pages: 94-130
Date: 1971
Format: Short novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:At some period in the future a drug called tempus is developed which enables people to travel backward in time, literally or perhaps in mind alone. Young people are required to take tempus journeys as part of the educational process. Story takes place in contemporary United States, c. 1970, and analyzes current problems by confronting the protagonist with a tempus-using visitor from the future.




Author: Sheckley, Robert
Title: Down the digestive tract
In: Can You Feel Anything When I Do This? (By Robert Silverberg)
Publisher: Doubleday and Co., New York
Pages: 145-147
Date: 1971
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as reality-testers
Annotation:An underground chemist gives a friend a mixture of hallucinogenic drugs guaranteed to send him into a true trip. Friend waits impatiently for the hallucinations to hit. Chemist and friend are actually not human but alien insecto-reptilian creatures, and it turns out that the hallucination the friend has is that of being a human being in our contemporary world.





Author: Silverberg, Robert
Title: Downward to the Earth
Publisher: New American Library, New York
Pages: 176 pp.
Date: 1971
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:The venom of a serpent found on an alien planet that has been colonized by Earthmen proves to have medicinal value, serving as a catalyst in limb-regeneration work; but when used in a different dosage it has psychological effects, evoking in Earthmen the illusion that they have been transformed into the elephant-like intelligent species that is the dominant native life-form of the planet. Illicit use of the drug for this purpose is common among the Earthmen stationed there. Protagonist, expiating old guilts, goes among the elephant-beings and eventually is admitted into ecstatic communion with them through use of the drug.




Author: Silverberg, Robert
Title: A Time of Changes
Publisher: New American Library, New York
Pages: 220 pp.
Date: 1971
Format: Novel
Descriptors: Drugs as mind-expanders, drugs as a means of communication
Annotation:Scene is a planet of the future dominated by stern culture that makes a fetish of privacy and personal reticence. Narrator obtains from a "primitive" culture on another continent a drug which attacks the basics of his native culture by making possible direct telepathic contact between minds. He attempts to found a subculture of love and openness based on use of the drug, but, although he is a prince of the realm, he is proscribed and hunted down.





Author: Silverberg, Robert
Title: The World Inside
Publisher: Doubleday and Co., New York
Pages: 201 pp.
Date: 1971
Format: Novel
Descriptors: Drugs as mind-expanders, drugs as a means of communication
Annotation:In world of 24th century, most of mankind lives in thousand-story apartment buildings each of which has a population of more than 800,000. Chapter three of the novel follows the adventures of a musician who, after performing at a concert, drugs himself with a multiplexer, a mind-expanding drug that temporarily induces a telepathic contact simultaneously with all 800,000 residents of his building, so that he perceives their lives and thoughts in one vast intricate construct.




Author: Davis, Grania
Title: My head's in a different place now
In: Universe Two, (Edited by Terry Carr)
Publisher: Ace Books, New York
Pages: 151-172
Date: 1972
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Young American married couple, weary of life on welfare in a large city, travel into Central American jungle in search of a drug-using primitive tribe of which they have heard. Eventually they find an Eden-like place where the natives, though dominated by fears of supernatural beings, seem whole and happy. The Americans discover hallucinogenic mushrooms near the village, begin using them, and settle into an amiable life of tripping and telepathic contact with animals, insects, and plants. As story ends they are planning to turn on the unsuspecting villagers.





Author: Hollis, H. H.
Title: Stoned counsel
In: Again, Dangerous Visions, (Edited by Harlan Ellison)
Publisher: Doubleday and Co., New York
Pages: 270-281
Date: 1972
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:In world of near future hallucinogenic drugs have become a routine part of the legal process. Lawyers examine evidence that is fed to them in direct association with LSD and other drugs, and trials are conducted with prosecutors and defense attorneys both in a drug-enhanced mental state. Approach of the story is sympathetic and detached; drug-enhancement is depicted as a new phase, not necessarily negative in implication, in courtroom procedure.




Author: Jones, Langdon
Title: The eye of the lens
In: The Eye of the Lens (By Langdon Jones)
Publisher: Collier Books, New York
Pages: 53-90
Date: 1972
Format: Short novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Avant-garde story without summarizable plot: it attempts to depict various cinematic and psychedelic modes of perception and includes (p. 84) an explicitly psychedelic scene within a British cathedral of the near future where hallucinatory religious rituals take place.





Author: Nelson, Ray
Title: Time travel for pedestrians
In: Again, Dangerous Visions, (Edited by Harlan Ellison)
Publisher: Doubleday and Co., New York
Pages: 140-159
Date: 1972
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Protagonist, using crushed "flower seeds" plus auto-hypnotic techniques, embarks on a trip in which his consciousness perceives past existences. He travels mentally to medieval northern Europe, to Egypt shortly after the time of Jesus, to medieval southern France, and other eras.




Author: Niven, Larry
Title: The fourth profession
In: Best Science Fiction of the Year, Vol. I, (Edited by Terry Carr)
Publisher: Ballantine Books, New York
Pages: 293-340
Date: 1972
Format: Short novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Alien beings known as Monks come to Earth and, to serve purposes of their own, distribute a variety of strange pills. One of these drugs is an intelligence-enhancer, another is a memory-destroyer, another induces instantaneous transport from one place to another. Story explores the effects of these and other alien-given drugs and the motivations of the aliens who distribute them.





Author: Silverberg, Robert
Title: Dying Inside
Publisher: Charles Scribner's and Sons, New York
Pages: 245 pp.
Date: 1972
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as means of communication
Annotation:Story takes place in 1976. Narrator is middle-aged New York intellectual who has had the power of telepathy since childhood and now is losing it. The power has embittered him by rendering him a freak, and he has taken pains to conceal knowledge of it from others. He tells how, in 1968, a close love relationship of his was terminated when he and his woman friend took LSD together; the trip had the unexpected effect of opening a two-way telepathic channel between them, so that not only could he read her mind as usual but she briefly had access to his, giving her a bad trip and causing her to recoil from him.




Author: Spinrad, Norman
Title: No direction home
In: Best Science Fiction of the Year, Vol. I, (Edited by Terry Carr)
Publisher: Ballantine Books, New York
Pages: 227-244
Date: 1972
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Scene is United States of the near future in which psychedelic drugs of all kinds, including many not yet known, are legal and widely used on all levels of society. Story speculates in detail on the nature of a commercialized legal psychedelics industry and on the forms future drugs may take.





Author: Bradley, Marion Zimmer
Title: Darkover Landfall
Publisher: Daw Books, New York
Pages: 160 pp.
Date: 1973
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Story describes the arrival on the extrasolar planet of Darkover of a shipload of colonists from Earth, and explores the impact on the Earthmen of the Ghost Wind, a native meteorological phenomenon that has psychedelic effects, caused by pollen, dust, or virus, which liberate ESP powers in their minds. The settlers, bombarded by hitherto unfamiliar sensory data, are plunged into conflict that transforms the group.




Author: Brunner, John
Title: The Stone That Never Came Down
Publisher: Doubleday and Co., New York
Pages: 206 pp.
Date: 1973
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Scene is London, 1980's: a time of chaos with World War III imminent. Chemists discover drug called VCviral coefficient—which has the property of greatly intensifying sensory perception and amplifying intelligence and memory. Drug has ability to multiply in proper environment like living organism. When an unemployed teacher who has had an experimental dose of VC donates blood to central bloodbank, he unwittingly spreads VC widely to the world at large, causing an epidemic of sanity in which world leaders, now greatly more intelligent, take steps to abolish warfare and establish an ideally rational society.





Author: Dickson, Gordon R.
Title: The R-Master
Publisher: Lippincott, Philadelphia
Pages: 216 pp.
Date: 1973
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:In the middle of the 21st century an intelligence-enhancing drug called Reninase-47 has come into wide use. Though normally it simply stimulates the thought process, R-47 occasionally does massive damage to the mind, and in a few cases creates a super-genius, an R-master. Protagonist's brother takes R-47 and suffers brain damage. In order to help him, protagonist also takes the drug and unexpectedly emerges from treatment as an R-master, a member of an extraordinary elite group, and from another R-master he learns of the need for a vast reorganization of governmental policies. He becomes a revolutionary leader and works toward a transformation of society.




Author: Free, Colin
Title: The Soft Kill
Publisher: Berkley Books, New York
Pages: 159 pp.
Date: 1973
Format: Novel
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-controllers
Annotation:Protagonist is a scientist stationed aboard an orbiting research station of the far future. Needing a holiday, he is transferred to a place called HighTown—an overpopulated city where a totalitarian government maintains control by dosing the citizens with a variety of tranquilizing and euphoric drugs. Novel explores the effect of government-by-chemistry.





Author: Pumilia, Joseph F.
Title: As dreams are made on
Journal: Fantastic Science Fiction, Vol. 22, No. 3, 18-29
Publisher: Ultimate Publishing Co., New York
Date: 1973
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:Teenage boy obtains a supply of metamorphium, a drug that induces fantasy-gratification dreams. Not only are his dreams richly satisfying, but he discovers that his girlfriend, whom he sees in the dreams, is aware of the visions as if the drug has induced some telepathic link between them. He has a vision of a time when everyone is linked through shared metamorphium dreams—"one big dream, one big mind asleep and dreaming all the time," even though individual dreamers will wake from the big dream.




Author: Rotsler, William
Title: Gods of Zar
Journal: Amazing Stories, Vol. 47, No. 3, 20-40
Publisher: Ultimate Publishing Co., New York
Date: 1973
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as euphorics
Annotation:An Earthman stranded on an alien planet becomes god of the local native race. When his people are attacked by a hostile tribe he defeats the enemy soldiers by dosing them with tazeel, a euphoric drug of the planet that destroys their discipline and converts them instantly from Spartan ferocity to self-indulgence.





Author: Scortia, Thomas N.
Title: The weariest river
In: Future City, (Edited by Roger Elwood)
Publisher: Trident Press, New York
Pages: 108-148
Date: 1973
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as euphorics
Annotation:The scene is about 350 years from now. An immortality treatment has been perfected and the world has become a savagely overcrowded, polluted urban sprawl in which people live forever. Drugs are the main refuge from boredom among the immortals. The protagonist is the inventor of the immortality serum, whose life is spent in an endless search for illegal drugs to palliate his guilt and spiritual malaise.




Author: Spinrad, Norman
Title: The weed of time
Journal: Vertex, Vol. 1, No. 3
Publisher: Mankind Publishing Co., Los Angeles
Pages: 58, 92-93
Date: 1973
Format: Short story
Descriptor: Drugs as mind-expanders
Annotation:An exploratory mission to the fifth planet of the star Tau Ceti in 2048 discovers a plant that is given the name of Tempis ceti, seeds and leaves of which have a psychedelic property: they destroy the linear perception of time and enable the subject to view all moments along his lifespan simultaneously. Seeds of the plant prove to be fertile on Earth and the drug comes into common use. Protagonist is a time-drug user whose simultaneous perception of his 110-year life-span sends him to a mental hospital.