Euripides and His Age/Advertisements

The
Home University
Library of Modern
Knowledge
A Comprehensive Series of New
and Specially Written Books

EDITORS:

Prof. GILBERT MURRAY, D.Litt., LL.D., F.B.A.
HERBERT FISHER, M.A., F.B.A.
Prof. J. ARTHUR THOMSON, M.A.
Prof. WM. T. BREWSTER, M.A.

The Home University Library

"Is without the slightest doubt the pioneer in supplying serious literature for a large section of the public who are interested in the liberal education of the State.—The Dialy Mail.

"It is a thing very favourable to the real success of The Home University Library that its volumes do not merely attempt to feed ignorance with knowledge. The authors noticeably realise that the simple willing appetite of sharp-set ignorance is not specially common nowadays; what is far more common is a hunger which has been partially but injudiciously filled, with more or less serious results of indigestion. The food supplied is therefore frequently medicinal as well as nutritious; and this is certainly what the time requires."—Manchester Guardian.

"Each volume represents a three-hours' traffic with the talking-power of a good brain, operating with the ease and interesting freedom of a specialist dealing with his own subject. . . . A series which promises to perform a real social service."—The Times.

"We can think of no series now being issued which better deserves support."—The Observer.

"We think if they were given as prizes in place of the more costly rubbish that is wont to be dispensed on prize days, the pupils would find more pleasure and profit. If the publishers want a motto for the series they might well take: 'Infinite riches in a little room.'"—Irish Journal of Education.

"The scheme was successful at the start because it met a want among earnest readers; but its wider and sustained success, surely, comes from the fact that it has to a large extent created and certainly refined the taste by which it is appreciated."—Daily Chronicle.

"Here is the world's learning in little, and none too poor to give it house-room!"—Daily Telegraph.

1/- net
in cloth
256 Pages 2/6 net
in leather

History and Geography

3. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

By Hilaire Belloc, M.A. (With Maps.) "It is coloured with all the militancy of the author's temperament."—Daily News.

4. HISTORY OF WAR AND PEACE

By G. H. Perris. The Rt. Hon. James Bryce writes: "I have read it with much interest and pleasure, admiring the skill with which you have managed to compress so many facts and views into so small a volume."

8. POLAR EXPLORATION

By Dr. W. S. Bruce, F.R.S.E., Leader of the "Scotia" Expedition. (With Maps.) "A very freshly written and interesting narrative."—The Times.

12. THE OPENING-UP OF AFRICA

By Sir H. H. Johnston, G.C.M.G., F.Z.S. (With Maps.) "The Home University Library is much enriched by this excellent work."—Daily Mail.

13. MEDIÆVAL EUROPE

By H. W. C. Davis, M.A. (With Maps.) "One more illustration of the fact that it takes a complete master of the subject to write briefly upon it."—Manchester Guardian.

14. THE PAPACY & MODERN TIMES (1303–1870)

By William Barry, D.D. "Dr Barry has a wide range of knowledge and an artist's power of selection."—Manchester Guardian.

23. HISTORY OF OUR TIME (1885–1911)

By G. P. Gooch, M.A. "Mr Gooch contrives to breathe vitality into his story, and to give us the flesh as well as the bones of recent happenings."—Observer.

25. THE CIVILISATION OF CHINA

By H. A. Giles, LL.D., Professor of Chinese at Cambridge. "In all the mass of facts, Professor Giles never becomes dull. He is always ready with a ghost story or a street adventure for the reader's recreation."—Spectator.

29. THE DAWN OF HISTORY

By J. L. Myres, M.A., F.S.A, Wykeham Professor of Ancient History, Oxford. "There is not a page in it that is not suggestive."—Manchester Guardian.

33. THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND

A Study in Political Evolution
By Prof.A. F. Pollard, M.A. With a Chronological Table. "It takes its place at once among the authoritative works on English history."—Observer.

34. CANADA

By A. G. Bradley. "The volume makes an immediate appeal to the man who wants to know something vivid and true about Canada."—Canadian Gazette.

37. PEOPLES & PROBLEMS OF INDIA

By Sir T. W. Holderness, K.C.S.I., Permanent Under-Secretary of State of the India Office. "Just the book which newspaper readers require to-day, and a marvel of comprehensiveness."—Pall Mall Gazette.

42. ROME

By W. Warde Fowler, M.A. "A masterly sketch of Roman character and of what it did for the world."—The Spectator.

48. THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

By F. L. Paxson, Professor of American History, Wisconsin University. (With Maps.) "A stirring study."—The Guardian.

51. WARFARE IN BRITAIN

By Hilaire Belloc, M.A. "Rich in suggestion for the historical student."—Edinburgh Evening News.

55. MASTER MARINERS

By J. R. Spears. "A continuous story of shipping progress and adventure. . . It reads like a romance."—Glasgow Herald.

61. NAPOLEON

By Herbert Fisher, M.A., F.B.A. (With Maps.) The story of the great Bonaparte's youth, his career, and his downfall, with some sayings of Napoleon, a genealogy of his family, and a bibliography.

66. THE NAVY AND SEA POWER

By David Hannay. The author traces the growth of naval power from early times, and discusses its principles and effects upon the history of the Western world.

In Preparation

ANCIENT GREECE. By Prof. Gilbert Murray, D.Litt., LL.D., F.B.A.
ANCIENT EGYPT. By F. Ll. Griffith, M.A.
THE ANCIENT EAST. By D. G. Hogarth, M.A., F.B.A.
A SHORT HISTORY OE EUROPE. By Herbert Fisher, M.A., F.B.A.
PREHISTORIC BRITAIN. By Robert Munro, M.A., M.D., LL.D.
THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE. By Norman H. Baynes.
THE REFORMATION. By Principal Lindsay, LL.D.
A SHORT HISTORY OF RUSSIA. By Prof. Milyoukov.
MODERN TURKEY. By D. G. Hogarth, M.A.
FRANCE OF TO-DAY. By Albert Thomas.
GERMANY OF TO-DAY. By Charles Tower.
HISTORY OF SCOTLAND. By R. S. Rait, M.A.
SOUTH AMERICA. By Prof. W. R. Shepherd.
LONDON. By Sir Laurence Gomme, F.S.A.
HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF SPAIN. By J. Fitzmaurice-Kelly, F.B.A., Litt.D.


Literature and Art

2. SHAKESPEARE

By John Masefield. "The book is a joy. We have had half-a-dozen more learned books on Shakespeare in the last few years, but not one so wise."—Manchester Guardian.

27. ENGLISH LITERATURE: MODERN

By G. H. Mair, M.A. "Altogether a fresh and individual book."—Observer.

35. LANDMARKS IN FRENCH LITERATURE

By G L. Strachey. "It is difficult to imagine how a better account of French Literature could be given in 250 small pages."—The Times.

39. ARCHITECTURE

By Prof. W. R. Lethaby. (Over forty Illustrations.) "Popular guide-books to architecture are, as a rule, not worth much. This volume is a welcome exception."—Building News. "Delightfully bright reading."—Christian World.

43. ENGLISH LITERATURE: MEDIÆVAL

By Prof. W. P. Ker, M.A. "Prof. Ker, one of the soundest scholars in English we have, is the very man to put an outline of English Mediæval Literature before the uninstructed public. His knowledge and taste are unimpeachable, and his style is effective, simple, yet never dry."—The Athenæum.

45. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

By L. Pearsall Smith, M.A. "A wholly fascinating study of the different streams that went to the making of the great river of the English speech."—Daily News.

52. GREAT WRITERS OF AMERICA

By Prof. J. Erskine and Prof. W. P. Trent. "An admirable summary from Franklin to Mark Twain, enlivened by a dry humour."—Athenæum.

63. PAINTERS AND PAINTING

By Sir Frederick Wedmore. (With 16 half-tone illustrations.) From the Primitives to the Impressionists.

64. DR JOHNSON AND HIS CIRCLE

By John Bailey, M.A.

65. THE LITERATURE OF GERMANY

By Professor J. G. Robertson, M.A., Ph.D. A review of one of the greatest literatures of the world by a high authority.

70. THE VICTORIAN AGE IN LITERATURE

By G. K. Chesterton. "The Victorian Compromise and its Enemies"—"The Great Victorian Novelists"—"The Great Victorian Poets"—"The Break-up of the Compromise."

In Preparation

ANCIENT ART & RITUAL. By Miss Jane Harrison, LL.D., D.Litt.
GREEK LITERATURE. By Prof. Gilbert Murray, D.Litt.
LATIN LITERATURE. By Prof. J. S. Phillimore.
CHAUCER AND HIS TIME. By Miss G. E. Hadow.
THE RENAISSANCE. By Miss Edith Sichel.
ITALIAN ART OF THE RENAISSANCE. By Roger E. Fry, M.A.
ENGLISH COMPOSITION. By Prof. Wm. T. Brewster.
LITERARY TASTE. By Thomas Seccombe.
WILLIAM MORRIS AND HIS CIRCLE. By A. Clutton Brock.
GREAT WRITERS OF RUSSIA. By C. T. Hagberg Wright, LL.D.
SCANDINAVIAN HISTORY & LITERATURE. By T. C. Snow, M.A.


Science

7. MODERN GEOGRAPHY

By Dr Marion Newbigin. (Illustrated.) "Geography, again: what a dull, tedious study that was wont to be! . . . But Miss Marion Newbigin invests its dry bones with the flesh and blood of romantic interest."—Daily Telegraph.

9. THE EVOLUTION OF PLANTS

By Dr D. H. Scott, M.A., F.R.S., late Hon. Keeper of the Jodrell Laboratory, Kew. (Fully illustrated.) "The information is as trustworihy as first-hand knowledge can make it. . . . Dr Scott's candid and familiar style makes the difficult subject both fascinating and easy."—Gardeners' Chronicle.

17. HEALTH AND DISEASE

By W. Leslie Mackenzie, M.D., Local Government Board, Edinburgh. "Dr Mackenzie adds to a thorough grasp of the problems an illuminating style, and an arresting manner of treating a subject often dull and sometimes unsavoury."—Economist.

18. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS

By A. N. Whitehead, Sc.D., F.R.S. (With Diagrams.) "Mr Whitehead has discharged with conspicuous success the task he is so exceptionally qualified to undertake. For he is one of our great authorities upon the foundations of the science."—Westminster Gazette.

19. THE ANIMAL WORLD

By Professor F. W. Gamble, D.Sc., F.R.S. With Introduction by Sir Oliver Lodge. (Many Illustrations.) "A delightful and instructive epitome of animal (and vegetable) life. . . . A fascinating and suggestive survey."—Morning Post.

20. EVOLUTION

By Professor J. Arthur Thomson and Professor Patrick Geddes. "A many-coloured and romantic panorama, opening up, like no other book we know, a rational vision of world-development."—Belfast News-Letter.

22. CRIME AND INSANITY

By Dr C. A. Mercier. "Furnishes much valuable information from one occupying the highest position among medico-legal psychologists."—Asylum News.

46. PSYCHICAL RESEARCH

By Sir W. F. Barrett, F.R.S., Professor of Physics, Royal College of Science, Dublin, 1873–1910. "What he has to say on thought-reading, hypnotism, telepathy, crystal-vision, spiritualism, divinings, and so on, will be read with avidity."—Dundee Courier.

31. ASTRONOMY

By A. R. Hinks, M.A., Chief Assistant, Cambridge Observatory. "Original in thought, eclectic in substance, and critical in treatment. . . . No better little book is available."—School World.

32. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE

By J. Arthur Thomson, M.A., Regius Professor of Natural History, Aberdeen University. "Professor Thomson's delightful literary style is well known; and here he discourses freshly and easily on the methods of science and its relations with philosophy, art, religion, and practical life."—Aberdeen Journal.

36. CLIMATE AND WEATHER

By Prof. H. N. Dickson, D.Sc.Oxon., M.A., F.R.S.E., President of the Royal Meteorological Society. (With Diagrams.) "The author has succeeded in presenting in a very lucid and agreeable manner the causes of the movements of the atmosphere and of the more stable winds."—Manchester Guardian.

41. ANTHROPOLOGY

By R. R. Marett, M.A., Reader in Social Anthropology in Oxford University. "An absolutely perfect handbook, so clear that a child could understand it, so fascinating and human that it beats fiction 'to a frazzle.'"—Morning Leader.

44. THE PRINCIPLES OE PHYSIOLOGY

By Prof. J. G. McKenkrick, M.D. "It is a delightful and wonderfully comprehensive handling of a subject which, while of importance to all, does not readily lend itself to untechnical explanation. . . . Upon every page of it is stamped the impress of a creative imagination."—Glasgow Herald.

46. MATTER AND ENERGY

By F. Soddy, M.A., F.R.S. "Prof. Soddy has successfully accomplished the very difficult task of making physics of absorbing interest on popular lines."—Nature.

49. PSYCHOLOGY, THE STUDY OF BEHAVIOUR

By Prof. W. McDougall, F.R.S., M.B. "A happy example of the non-technical handling of an unwieldy science, suggesting rather than dogmatising. It should whet appetites for deeper study."—Christian World.

53. THE MAKING OF THE EARTH

By Prof. J. W. Gregory, F.R.S. (With 38 Maps and Figures.) "A fascinating little volume. . . . Among the many good things contained in the series this takes a high place."—The Athenæum.

57. THE HUMAN BODY

By A. Keith, M.D., LL.D., Conservator of Museum and Hunterian Professor. Royal College of Surgeons. (Illustrated.) "It literally makes the 'dry bones' to live. It will certainly take a high place among the classics of popular science."—Manchester Guardian.

58. ELECTRICITY

By Gisbert Kapp, D.Eng., Professor of Electrical Engineering in the University of Birmingham. (Illustrated.) "It will be appreciated greatly by learners and by the great number of amateurs who are interested in what is one of the most fascinating of scientific studies."—Glasgow Herald.

62. THE ORIGIN AND NATURE OF LIFE

By Dr. Benjamin Moore, Professor of Bio-Chemistry, University College, Liverpool.

67. CHEMISTRY

By Raphael Meldola, F.R.S., Professor of Chemistry in Finsbury Technical College, London. Presents clearly, without the detail demanded by the expert, the way in which chemical science has developed, and the stage it has reached.

In Preparation

THE MINERAL WORLD. By Sir T. H. Holland, K.C.I.E., D.Sc.
PLANT LIFE. By Prof. J. B. Farmer, F.R.S.
NERVES. By Prof. D. Fraser Harris, M.D., D.Sc.
A STUDY OF SEX. By Prof. J. A. Thomson and Prof. Patrick Geddes.
THE GROWTH OF EUROPE. By Prof. Grenville Cole.
OCEANOGRAPHY. By Sir John Murray, K.C.B., F.R.S.


Philosophy and Religion

15. MOHAMMEDANISM

By Prof. D. S. Margoliouth, M.A., D.Litt. "This generous shilling's worth of wisdom. . . . A delicate, humorous, and most responsible tractate by an illuminative professor."—Daily Mail.

40. THE PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY

By the Hon. Bertrand Russell, F.R.S. "A book that the 'man in the street' will recognise at once to be a boon. . . . Consistently lucid and non-technical throughout."—Christian World.

47. BUDDHISM

By Mrs Rhys Davids, M.A. "The author presents very attractively as well as very learnedly the philosophy of Buddhism as the greatest scholars of the day interpret it."—Daily News.

50. NONCONFORMITY: Its ORIGIN and PROGRESS

By Principal W. B. Selbie, M.A. "The historical part is brilliant in its insight, clarity, and proportion; and in the later chapters Dr Selbie proves himself to be an ideal exponent of sound and moderate views."—Christian World.

54. ETHICS

By G. E. Moore, M.A., Lecturer in Moral Science in Cambridge University. "A very lucid though closely reasoned outline of the logic of good conduct. . . . This non-technical little book should make for clear thinking and wider tolerance."—Christian World.

56. THE MAKING OF THE NEW TESTAMENT

By Prof. B. W. Bacon, LL.D., D.D. "Professor Bacon has boldly, and wisely, taken his own line, mentioning opposing views only occasionally, and has produced, as a result, an extraordinarily vivid, stimulating, and lucid book."—Manchester Guardian.

60. MISSIONS: THEIR RISE and DEVELOPMENT

By Mrs Creighton. "Very interestingly done. . . . Its style is simple, direct, unhackneyed, and should find appreciation where a more fervently pious style of writing repels."—Methodist Recorder.

68. COMPARATIVE RELIGION

By Prof. J. Estlin Carpenter, D.Litt., Principal of Manchester College, Oxford.

In Preparation

THE OLD TESTAMENT. By Prof. George Moore, D.D., LL.D.
BETWEEN THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS. By R. H. Charles, D.D.
A HISTORY of FREEDOM of THOUGHT. By Prof. J. B. Bury, LL.D.
A HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY. By Clement Webb, M.A.


Social Science

1. PARLIAMENT

Its History, Constitution, and Practice. By Sir Courtenay P. Ilbert, G.C.B., K.C.S.I., Clerk of the House of Commons. "The best book on the history and practice of the House of Commons since Bagehot's 'Constitution.'"—Yorkshire Post.

5. THE STOCK EXCHANGE

By F. W. Hirst, Editor of "The Economist." "To an unfinancial mind must be a revelation. . . . The book is as clear, vigorous, and sane as Bagehot's' Lombard Street,' than which there is no higher compliment."—Morning Leader.

6. IRISH NATIONALITY

By Mrs J. R. Green. "As glowing as it is learned. No book could be more timely."—Daily News.

10. THE SOCIALIST MOVEMENT

By J. Ramsay MacDonald, M.P. "Admirably adapted for the purpose of exposition."—The Times.

11. CONSERVATISM

By Lord Hugh Cecil, M.A., M.P. "One of those great little books which seldom appear more than once in a generation."—Morning Post.

16. THE SCIENCE OF WEALTH

By J. A. Hobson, M.A. "Mr J. A. Hobson holds an unique position among living economists. . . . Original, reasonable, and illuminating."—The Nation.

21. LIBERALISM

By L. T. Hobhouse, M.A., Professor of Sociology in the University of London. "A book of rare quality. . . . We have nothing but praise for the rapid and masterly summaries of the arguments from first principles which form a large part of this book."—Westminster Gazette.

24. THE EVOLUTION OF INDUSTRY

By D. H. Macgregor, M.A., Protestor of Political Economy in the University of Leeds. "A volume so dispassionate in terms may be read with profit by all interested in the present state of unrest."—Aberdeen Journal.

26. AGRICULTURE

By Prof. W. Somerville, F.L.S. "It makes the results of laboratory work at the University accessible to the practical farmer."—Athenæum.

30. ELEMENTS OF ENGLISH LAW

By W. M. Geldart, M.A., B.C.L., Vinerian Professor of English Law at Oxford. "Contains a very clear account of the elementary principles underlying the rules of English Law."—Scots Law Times.

38. THE SCHOOL: An Introduction to the Study of Education.

By J. J. Findlay, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education in Manchester University. "An amazingly comprehensive volume. . . . It is a remarkable performance, distinguished in its crisp, striking phraseology as well as its inclusiveness of subject-matter."—Morning Post.

59. ELEMENTS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

By S. J. Chapman, M.A., Professor of Political Economy in Manchester University. "Its importance is not to be measured by its price. Probably the best recent critical exposition of the analytical method in economic science."—Glasgow Herald.

69. THE NEWSPAPER

By G. Binney Dibblee, M.A. (Illustrated.) The best account extant of the organisation of the newspaper press, including Continental, American, and Colonial journals.

In Preparation

POLITICAL THOUGHT IN ENGLAND: From Bacon to Locke. By G. P. Gooch, M.A.
POLITICAL THOUGHT IN ENGLAND: From Bentham to J. S. Mill. By Prof. W. L. Davidson
POLITICAL THOUGHT IN ENGLAND: From Herbert Spencer to To-day. By Ernest Barker, M.A.
SHELLEY, GODWIN, AND THEIR CIRCLE. By H. N. Brailsford.
THE CRIMINAL AND THE COMMUNITY. By Viscount St. Cyres, M.A.
COMMONSENSE IN LAW. By Prof. P. Vinogradoff, D.C.L.
THE CIVIL SERVICE. By Graham Wallas, M.A.
ENGLISH VILLAGE LIFE. By E. K. Bennett, M.A.
CO-PARTNERSHIP AND PROFIT-SHARING. By Aneurin Williams, J. P.
THE SOCIAL SETTLEMENT. By Jane Addams and R. A. Woods.
GREAT INVENTIONS. By Prof J. L. Myres, M.A., F.S.A.
TOWN PLANNING. By Raymond Unwin.


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