Open main menu

Front pagesEdit

Junius Henderson Field Notebook No. 4 Sept. 7, 1909 - Aug. 30, 1910 No. 4. Note (figure of man) book. Sept 7, 1909 - Aug. 30, 1910

Colorado TripsEdit

Around Colorado

Field Notebook No. 4. Mostly California and New Mexico. Pueblo, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pueblo, CO Sept. 7, 1909Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg September 7, 1909

Still partly cloudy as we entered Royal GorgeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Royal Gorge, CO at, and soon began to rain again. River high and muddy. Rock slides and old track washed in recently. Gorge in gneiss and granite. Breakfast at Pueblo, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pueblo, CO, 8 a.m. Clearing up as we left Colorado SpringsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coloroad Springs, CO at about 10 a.m. Clear when we reached DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO at 1:15 p.m. Dined at Oxford HotelCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oxford Hotel. Bought some instruments of J. Durbin Surgical and Dental Supply Co. 1508 Curtis Street. Called on Fred E. Anderson, 1735 Gilpin Street, to see seal skin and skull referred to the museum by his father, Dr. Anderson. Then on Jonas Bros., 1814 Stout St. to arrange for mounting it at a price of $12.00. Left for BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO at 4 p.m. by C. & S. Heavy rains indicated all the way. Prof. Cockerell and wife on train, returning from Europe. Also Austin Russell returning from White RiverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg White River, CO. Reached BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO at 5:15

Boulder, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO Dec. 21,1909Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg December 21, 1909 Started up Boulder CanyonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO at 11:15 a.m., with camp pack and 16 Gauge double barreled shotgun. 15˚ above zero. Heavy snow on ground. Sun shining. Just inside the canyon saw flock of 25 pinon jaysWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus. A few mt. chickadeeWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Poecile gambeli and juncosWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Junco hyemalis, long crested jaysWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cyanocitta stelleri and magpiesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Corvidae. At Coburn MillCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coburn Mill saw several birds which I believe were red breasted nuthatchesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Sitta canadensis. Reached the Marchioness tunnell (sic) at 3:30. Saw a pine squirrelWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Tamiasciurus. Set 11 traps for miceWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg mice, shrewsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg shrews etc. John Blanchard reached the cabin at 4:30. After getting a short distance up the canyon even the PeromyscusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Peromyscus tracks become scarce. At the Marchioness there were very few tracks. Set 11 traps about there.

Marchioness Tunnel Dec, 22, 1909Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg December 22, 1909

West wind in morning; 6˚ above zero at 6:30 a.m., 26 above at 7:45. Nothing in the traps. I do not understand the absences of small mammals, especially PeromyscusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Peromyscus. Is it possible they are hibernating. Some tracks, but several days old, as the last sift of snow has obscured them. After breakfast found two house miceWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Mus musculus in the traps at the stable. We killed a mountain ratWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg mountain rat in the tunnel. Then climbed the mountain on north side of creek. CoyoteWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Canis latrans and rabbitWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg rabbit tracks . Saw two rabbitsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg rabbit, but did not get a shot at them. Took two Townsend solitairesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Myadestes townsendi and saw half a dozen more. Saw at least one red breasted nuthatchWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Sitta canadensis plainly with glass, but rough ground prevented a shot. Plenty of mt. chickadeesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Poecile gambeli and JuncoWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Junco spp. Returned to house at noon for dinner. Skinned the ratWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg rat after dinner. Then we went up the mountain north of creek. Saw two western robinsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Turdus migratorius ((?)) and heard several more. Took another solitaireWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Myadestes townsendi. I returned to skin the miceWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg mice and birds, while John went to the Marchioness Tunnel and brought back two batsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg bat and an arctic towheeWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg towhee. I skinned and prepared the two bats and two mice. We had the phonograph running all evening. Has been windy today. Bright tonight, 20˚ above zero at 9:30 p.m.

Marchioness Tunnel Dec. 23, 1909Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg December 23, 1909

16˚ above at 6:00 a.m., bright morning. While I was skinning birds, Blanchard went out and shot a robinWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Turdus migratorius and a pygmy nuthatchWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Sitta pygmaea. I caught another house mouseWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Mus musculus and a gray headed juncoWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Junco hyemalis caniceps in traps in the chicken coop. I put up two solitairesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Myadestes townsendi, robinWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Turdus migratoriusand one arctic towheeWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg towhee. Returned to BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO at 4 p.m. Boulder, Colo.Wikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Boulder, CO Saturday, Jany 9, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg January 9, 1910

At 1:30 p.m. went up Gregory canyonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Gregory Canyon, CO with Betts and Marvin to try new Marble "Game Getter" gun, .20 rifle and .44 shot. Cold west wind. Gun proved satisfactory. Saw following birds. Townsend solitaireWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Myadestes townsendi. (took one) Pink-sided juncoWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Junco hyemalis mearnsi (took one) several Long-crested jayWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cyanocitta stelleri several MagpieWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Corvidae several Mountain chickadeeWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Poecile gambeli common Long tailed chickadeeWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg chickadee common Batchelder woodpeckerWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg woodpecker one Heard canyon wrenWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Catherpes mexicanus constantly on hillside. Returned at 4:50. Round Butte Trip

Boulder, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO Mch. 17, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg March 17, 1910

Beautiful, balmy morning, west wind. P. G. Worcester, H. A. Aurand, R. M. Butters and I left BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO by C. & S. R.R. at 9:50, 27 minutes behind time. Round trip fare to Ft. CollinsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ft. Collins, CO $2.50 each. Reached Ft. CollinsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ft. Collins, CO at 11:25. Got dinner at Orpheum CafeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Orpheum Cafe. Left for WellingtonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Wellington, CO at 1:15, reached there at 1:40, round trip fare 60 cents. Got rooms at Hotel WellingtonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Hotel Wellington, then started north along the beet sugar spur to a cut ranging to 20 feet in depth, through probable Pleistocene deposits, laid over Pierre shales as indicated by fossils found in the bottom of the cut at one place - BaculitesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Baculites etc. The Pleistocene at base of walls of cut is sandy, scarcely consolidated, in color resembling the Fox Hills sandstone, enclosing some pebbles, with some intercalations of pebbly strata in higher horizons, capped by the usual coarse, unconsolidated conglomerate, including quartz, jasper, fossiliferous Pierre concretions, Carboniferous crinoidal limestone boulders etc. In one place were numerous fragments of horse bones in the sandy lower zone, of which we collected two teeth, which I take to be Pleistocene. Then started SE for a big ditch cut, and found Pierre shale on the way. The latter cut is about half a mile E by N from the Wellington StationCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Wellington Station. At the west end Pierre shales are exposed, with numerous concretions as at Boulder brickyards. Fossils were few, but we collected Baculites ovatusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Baculites ovatus, NuculidaeWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Nuculidae etc. Returned to hotel at 6 p.m. Retired at 9:15. Saw one bluebirdWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Sialia.

Wellington, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Wellington, CO, March 18, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg March 18, 1910

Up at 6 a.m., a clear morning and cool. Started with team from Hall's stable at 7:10 a.m. 3 mi. N and 1 1/2 mi. W of WellingtonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Wellington, CO found ditch cutting through Hygiene sandstone, containing Inoceramus spp.Wikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Inoceramus, BaculitesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Baculites, AnisomyonWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Anisomyon, AviculaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Avicula, OstreaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ostrea etc. Reached Round ButteCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Round Butte at 11:15. In creek bluff 1/2 mi. E of the butte Pierre dips SE 58˚, and is badly crushed. Hygiene sandstone passes through the butte. We ate lunch, fed the horses, then walked to the bluff NE of the butte. I photographed the bluff, with red Pleistocene conglomerate resting on lower Fox Hills sandstone, this in turn underlaid by black Pierre shales. One sandstone (Dakota or Arikaree) boulder in the conglomerate is 2 ft in diameter, We collected Fox Hills fossils at the bluffs, then collected Hygiene fossils S of Round ButteCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Round Butte where the strike is S 32˚ W and dip is 54˚. The concretions are similar to those at Fossil Ridge. Some of the Fox Hills fossils were found in concretions like those E of White Rock fault. The Pleistocene conglomerate contains much agatized wood or wood jasper etc. I found a sandstone boulder 3 ft. in diameter in it. We started back at 6:10, reached WellingtonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Wellington, CO at about 8:40, very tired. Team $4.00. Wellington, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Wellington, CO, Mch. 19. 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg March 19, 1910

Up at 6:15, got breakfast. Beautiful, perfectly clear morning. Hotel bill $2.70 each. Left of 7:30 train, reaching Ft. CollinsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ft. Collins, CO at 8 a.m., reached Trilby schoolhouseCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Trilby schoolhouse at 9:10 and began collecting fossils on Fossil RidgeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Fossil Ridge. Very hot by 10:30. Returned to Ft. CollinsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ft. Collins, CO at 3:30. Team $4.00.



Boulder ColoradoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO, Apl. 29, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg April 29, 1910.

Cooler and cloudy today, SE wind. Has been hot for several days. I left for DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO on 4 p.m. trainCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, one way to SalidaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Salida, CO. Round trip Boulder - Denver $1.60. Reached DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO at 5:10, dined at Oxford HotelCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oxford Hotel 85¢. One way ticket Denver to Salida $6.00. Sleeper $2.00. Got on sleeper at 8:30. Train started at 9 p.m. Had been sprinkling since 7 p.m.



Salida, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Salida, CO, Apl. 30, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg April 30, 1910

Arrived at 5:10, but as car was left here did not arise until 6 a.m. Got breakfast at the depot lunch room, then went to Principal Edgar Kesner's house. He went with me to Kenyon's house and Kenyon and I walked up Tenderfoot HillCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Tenderfoot Hill. Rock hereabouts all basaltic. At noon, the Kenyons, Mr. Cady and I dined with the Kesners. At 1:30 I talked about economic ornithology to the County teachers' institute, for over an hour, then went home with Kesner. After supper I went to Kenyons. Mr. And Mrs. Kenyon and I went to a morning pictures show, after which I got on the 11:35 train and went to bed. I[t] was partly cloudy through the day, wind variable, a little rain about noon.

Denver, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO, May 1, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 1, 1910

Arrived here at 7:50 and took narrow gauge train for BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO at 8 a.m., without breakfast. It was foggy the latter part of the night and is cold this morning.

Denver, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO May 16, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 16, 1910.

Cleared off during day and snow melted. Attended Dr. Edgar L. Hewitt's lecture on Central American ancient art, then took 9:30 p.m. car for DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO on way to MeekerCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO. Went to Oxford HotelCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oxford Hotel. Quite cold, may freeze. Fare 70¢.

DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO, May 17, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 17, 1910.

Got good nights sleep. Arose at 7:30. Quite cool. Breakfast 55¢, room $1.50. At 12:45 I lunched on car just beyond Colorado SpringsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Colorado Springs, CO- soup and strawberries and tip 55¢. Soon came to a series of tunnels then more open to Lake GeorgeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Lake George, CO. Another series of tunnels in Granite CanyonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Granite Canyon. Then came South ParkCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg South Park, CO, a broad comparatively level, valley through granite mountains, bounding slopes rather gentle, pine-clad. Many marginal ramifications to valley, South Platte River meanders through it, shallow, well grassed banks quite uniformly about a foot or two above the water. Valley suggests a filling stage rather than cutting. It seldom discloses a steep embankment of even 3 or 4 feet and no terraces. There are some beautiful meanders. Lots of sandstone, conglomerate and shale just before reaching BathCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg 38°54'41.16"N, 105°58'18.07"W. Then passed into Arkansas ValleyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Arkansas River. Storm gathering on mountains. South ParkCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg South Park, CO free from snow. Arkansas shows decided cutting and terracing, flowing in deeper channel than the PlatteCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Platte River. River had filled its valley with boulders to depth of 50 feet or more, big boulder, and has now cut to at least that depth. I suspect glacial deposits from the Collegiate RangeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Collegiate Peaks.

Left DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO at 9:16 a.m. for RifleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO over Colorado Midland R.R.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Colorado Midland Railway Fare one way $11.30 no round trip rate.

Rifle, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO, May 18, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 18, 1910

Reached here at 12:45, got to bed at 1 a.m. Arose at 6:30, having slept well. Bright and much warmer this morning. Slept and breakfasted at the Winchester HotelCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Winchester Hotel, $1.50. ((This hotel, of appropriate name for the town, was a Colorado landmark that was torn down in the 1960's. I Slept there once in December, 1961, and it was both clean and cheap, the room only being $2.50 then.)) The Little Book CliffsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Book Cliffs look very near, and very light gray in color. River in a secondary bottom, the terraces being 75 to 100 ft, high on the south side. Stage started for MeekerCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO at 8:15 a.m. Round trip fare $8.00. Did not get out of town until 8:45, with 7 adults, 4 children and a heavy load of baggage. YellowthroatsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Geothlypis and oriolesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg oriole common at RifleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO. First change of horses at 11:05, 12 miles from RifleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO. About a mile further we found the slide which occurred a month or two ago. The slide continued for 8 days, a hundred yards or more wide, the head being 1/4 or 1/2 mile up slope, the tongue extending about 100 ft. beyond old road, covering it to a depth of 25 feet or more. CedarsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Juniperus ((prob. J. virginiana)) all along the top of the slide are toppled in all directions. Reached Piceance CreekCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Piceance Creek Stage Station at 1 p.m. and stopped for dinner, 50¢. At 3:30 changed horses again, 28 miles out from RifleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO. Reached MeekerCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO, 44 miles from Rifle, at 6:25 p.m. Roads rough. Drainage channels all along are deep and narrow at bottom of valleys, showing present down cutting. At Hotel J. L. Riland, Dr. Stetson and Col. Montgomery met me and the first two dined with me. Spent the evening with Riland. He told me of big Indian mortars, etc., on Blue Mt., near RangeleyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rangley, CO [sic], discovered by John A. Story, of MeekerCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO. Also of a jade ? idol in possession of J. B. Nunnerick ((?)), of BufordCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Buford, CO, plowed up by him in OregonCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oregon. Also stone walls on a cliff ledge discovered west of MeekerCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO by Chester Lytle, whose address he will get. He had the jar discovered by Blythe which I saw last summer. I reexamined it. It is typical San Juan black-and-white type, but shows a barely perceptible glaze, especially on the black lines. Outline thus [drawing] with loops for thongs. Retired at 9:30 very tired.

Meeker, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO, May 19,1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 19, 1910.

Up at 7:15 a.m. Bright and warm. Breakfasted with Riland, then went with him to call on Mr. Donnelly, a taxidermist, who was not at home. He had an enormous mt. lionWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Puma concolor skin prepared with an immense head. Met Miss Davis and Miss Shafcott (?) teachers in the Meeker School, Mr. Stocky (Miss Carr's uncle). Called on Mr. Lytle, editor of Herald and Mr. J. H. Dennis, Episcopal rector. The Henry J. Hay, one of the school directors took me through the graded school. Also met Mr. Oland, in the bank, a University graduate. Mr. Moulton, a bank official, called on me at the hotel, having a son in the University. Dr. Samuel French took me to his rooming house and showed me some Indian grave relics which he presented to the University and Mr. Strocker, in the drug store, agreed to pack them for shipment. Met Principal Hale at the hotel table at noon. Afternoon laid down for a time. At 6 p.m. I dined with the rector and his family. Got to hall at 7:30 but the exercises did not begin until 8:30. I delivered the commencement address, talking about 45 minutes. Has been a fine day.

Meeker, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Meeker, CO, May 20, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 20, 1910

Cloudy morning. I arose at 6:45 a.m. to take the morning stage. Hotel bill $4.00. Stage got out of town at 7:40. Cold. Reached change of horses at 11 a.m. and Piceance CreekCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Piceance Creek, 20 miles from RifleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO, at 1:05 p.m. in rain. Dinner 50¢. Rained more or less at first in afternoon, then frightfully dusty giving me an attack of hay fever. Reached RifleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rifle, CO at 6:05 too late for Midland trainCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Colorado Midland Railway. Got off on D. & R.G.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad at 10:05, 35 minutes late. Sprinkling as we left. Supper 50¢. River 90 yds wide at bridge, bed twice as wide. Berth $2.50. On D. & R. G.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad , May 21, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg May 21, 1910

Cloudy, sprinkling this morning. Cold better, Breakfast 55¢. Roads muddy north of PuebloCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pueblo, CO, snowing at Colorado SpringsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Colorado Springs, CO, ground soon white. Dinner 55¢. Reached DenverCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Denver, CO at 1:40 p.m., caught 2 o'clock interurban car for BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO, still storming. About two inches of snow between Colorado Springs and Denver, none on ground at Boulder, but ground muddy. Reached BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO at 3:30 p.m.

San Pedro ReportingEdit

Southern California Tertiary and Pleistocene localities from Arnold's San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA Report.

San Diego Formation= Pliocene San Pedro Formation = Pleistocene

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA Bluff east of town is upper San Pedro Pleistocene, with fossils, especially at base of bluff. About 50 spp.

Deadman IslandCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island, CA

[N-S cross section drawing in book]

Raised beach at N end shows uplift still in progress, perfect color still preserved in the fossils, 34 species still living. At the arch point on east end Pliocene bluff capped unconformably by lower San Pedro. "Miocene" fossils reported are all from a Pliocene stratum unconformable on Miocene. Arnold p. 225. Pliocene - many species now live only in colder water to north. 17.3 % of fauna now extinct. Arnold pp15-16. 87 spp Pliocene on Deadman Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island, CA, of which 55 now live at San Pedro, 16 only north, none only south, 15 extinct, 1 doubtful. Lower San Pedro- a stratum 4 to 10 feet thick on W side, 20 ft on E side filled with fossils. Many of the species not found in Pliocene. 247 spp in lower San Pedro of Deadman Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island, CA, 158 now live at San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA, 43 only N of San Pedro, 8 only S of San Pedro, 31 extinct, 7 doubtful habitat. This also northern fauna. Upper San Pedro of Deadman Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island, CA 134 spp. Not as many as at San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA.


Post-Pleistocene Kitchen middens at Deadman Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island, CA, San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA, Santa BarbaraCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Barbara, CA etc. San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA

[S-N cross section of water front area in field book]

S end lowest terrace (bluff) looking N.E. from Crawfish GeorgesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Crawfish Georges towards Timms PointCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Timms Point, contorted Miocene shales overlaid by horizontal layers of upper San Pedro.

Lumber yard bluff looking SW toward San Pedro ValleyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro Valley, upper and lower Pleistocene, unconformable. Upper soil is kitchen midden. Lumber yard fauna more like that 200 or 300 miles further south shows a change in climate.

Pliocene lithologically and faunally same as at San DiegoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA. 28 Pliocene species at Timm's PointCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Timms Point. Pliocene also found at R.R. cut in bluff in S.E. San Pedro, with a stratum filled with Thracia trapezoidesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Thracia trapezoides.

Lower San Pedro in bluffs, 140 species, including 14 not found on Deadman IslandCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island, CA. Upper San Pedro- shallow R.R. cut at SW limit of San Pedro Terrace, 2 to 3 ft. bed of gravel with fossils, particularly in ravine cutting bluff at Crawfish GeorgesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Crawfish Georges. 252 species, 172 now living at San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA, 15 only N of San Pedro, 36 only S of San Pedro, 24 extinct, 4 doubtful.

Map of San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, CA

[Sketch map in field book] Los CerritosCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Cerritos, CA

[N-S cross section in field book] 160 species, all upper San Pedro.

Port AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Port Angeles, CA, Santa MonicaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Monica, CA

Hard sand beneath 100 ft. of soft sand at mouth of canyon at end of large wharf. 16 species, Pleistocene.

VenturaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ventura CA

Pleistocene, N of Barlow RanchCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Barlow Ranch, 3 mi. E. of VenturaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ventura CA<, nearly to summit of "The Peak", 25 ft. fossiliferous in many layers. 50 species, Peak 1000 ft or more high. Port HarfordCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Port Harford, CA

R.R. cut at Fossil PointCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Fossil Point, with 6 foot kitchen midden.

PismoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pismo Beach, CA

Miocene overlaid by San Pablo Neocene unconformably, all capped by Pleistocene brecciated shale.

Santa BarbaraCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Barbara, CA

Packard's HillCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Packard's Hill late Pliocene. I found apparently some bryozoanWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg bryozoan on S. end of Packard HillCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Packard Hill, a higher horizon than Pliocene exposure on east face.

La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA

Bluff capped by Pleistocene gravels and sands. Prof. Wm. E. Ritter, Director, Biol. Station San DiegoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, California Spanish Bight, hard layer fossiliferous Pleistocene forms beach at foot of bluff. Pacific BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pacific Beach, San Diego, slightly tilted San Diego Pliocene sandstone capped by horizontal upper San Pedro gravels. San Diego formation rests on massive gravels and conglomerates at Pacific BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pacific Beach, San Diego. Here San Diego has a Pecten expansusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pecten expansus and a Opalia varicostataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Opalia varicostata horizon. Foot of 26th st., upper San Pedro formation in lower half of bluff, with Anomia limatulaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Anomia limatula horizon at base and forming low reef on beach. Pliocene, 2 faunal horizons, but one stratigraphic unit.

((I have asked Shi-Kuei Wu to go over this list of taxa and he has made some corrections which I have included if they pertain to spelling. If the taxon has changed because of later revisions, corrections, or synonomies that is noted after the original reference.))

MolluscaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Mollusca Cowries. Cypraea spadiceaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cypraea spadicea- brown cowry Erato vitellinaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Erato vitellina, 1/2 in., heavy, smooth, aperture toothed Erato columbellaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Erato columbella, much smaller, delicate Ovula deflexaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ovula deflexa, slender- var. barbareuseWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ovula deflexa var. barbareuse

{added:} Trivia dolandriWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Trivia dolandri, large coffee bean with dorsal caudal in californica, small, no caudal

Conus californicusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Conus californicus Littorina planaxisWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Littorina planaxis- gray littorine, columella flattened by dissolution in advanced growth whorl. Littorina scutulataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Littorina scutulata- checked littorine, smaller, greenish-gray, white bands or specks, columella not flat. Melampus olivaceusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Melampus olivaceus, pear shaped, tide flats Lunatia herosWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lunatia heros, large, Atlantic coast Natica duplicataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Natica duplicata, small Atlantic coast Polynices lewisiiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Polynices lewisii- large ridged moonshell ((now LunatiaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lunatia)) Polynices recluzianusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Polynices recluzianus- southern moonshell, thick umbilical enamel ((now LunatiaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lunatia)) NaticaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Natica clausa-closed natica Norrisia norrisiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Norrisia norrisi- smooth, brown naticoid, green umbilicus. Pomaulax undosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosa- Wavy top shell ((now AstraeaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Astraea)) Phasianella comptaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Phasianella compta ? small pheasant shell Vermetus lituellusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Vermetus lituellus- ill shaped, flattened cone, not colonial, rough 1/8 in. ((SpiroglyphusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Spiroglyphus)) Vermetus squamigerusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Vermetus squamigerus-scaly wormshell ((SerpulorbisWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Serpulorbis)) Acmaea spectrumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea spectrum- ribbed limpet Acmaea patinaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea patina-plate limpet, nearly smooth, very fine striae Acmaea peltaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea pelta -shield limpet blunt ribs, high, conical, gray or striped, internal brown stripe(marginal) and brown central spot often Acmaea asmiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea asmi- black limpet, black, conical, 1/4 in. long Acmaea personaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea persona-mask limpet, apex near terminal ((drawing)), ribs prominent, irregular, outside gray or mottled, inside varying brown and white. Acmaea scabraWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea scabra- file limpet, fine, file-like riblets, variable light to dark, usually white inside Acmaea mitraWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea mitra -White cap, white conical, thick Acmaea insessaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea insessa-sea-weed limpet, small dark brown, horny, high peaked ((drawing)) Acmaea instabilisWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea instabilis - 3/4 in. , narrower than incessa, smooth, brown out and white in. Acmaea depictaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea depicta - painted limpet, narrow, flat sides straight, white with brown radiating lines, 6-12 mm, southern, on grass at high tide. Acmaea paleaceaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea paleacea - chaffy limpet, small, like last but narrower, brown no stripes. Has a var. triangularisWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea palacea var. triangularis. Lottia giganteaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lottia gigantea- Owl limpet, low, apex terminal, largest on coast Fissurella volcanoWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Fissurella volcano- volcano limpet, striped with reddish Fissuridea asperaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Fissuridea aspera- rough, conical, puncture oval, not narrow as in volcano, ribbed, gray with dark purple rays ((DiodoraWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Diodora)) Fissuridea murinaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Fissuridea murina- white keyhole limpet. Smaller, more delicate, oblong, round hole 1/3 from end, fine ribs checked concentrically, pure white 15 mm ((DiodoraWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Diodora)) Luscapina crenulataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Luscapina crenulata- great keyhole limpet. Largest American species ((MegathuraWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Megathura)) Lucapinella callomarginataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lucapinella callomarginata-Southern keyhole limpet. Small, low, large oblong hole, rough rays, white interior, gray or dark rayed exterior. Keyhole Limpets continued

Megatebennus bimaculatusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Megatebennus bimaculatus- smaller, hole large, dark rays on end making two white spots, northern Puncturella majorWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Puncturella major- large white limpet, Behring SeaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Behring Sea Puncturella galateaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Puncturella galatea-elevated. Puget SoundCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Puget Sound Puncturella cucullataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Puncturella cucullata- ribbed, Puget SoundCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Puget Sound to MontereyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Monterey, CA Puncturella cooperiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Puncturella cooperi- Catalina Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Catalina Island, CA- internal plate between puncture and apex Subemargulina gatesiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Subemargulina gatesi-MontereyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Monterey, CA- large, trough from apex to margin inside.

Haliotis fulgeusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis fulgeus-green abalone-southern, rather thin, low spiral ridges, interior mostly green, fine peacock scar, about 6 holes, 6 inches. Var. walallensisWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis fulgeus var. walallensis, from GualalaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Gualala, CA, Sonoma Co., longer flatter, paler nacre. Haliotis rufescensWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis rufescens- red abalone-outer layer projects over inner and makes fine red edge. Outside rough, holes large (3), prominent scar, 9 in., getting rare Haliotis cracherodiiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis cracherodii-black abalone, smooth Haliotis corrugataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis corrugata- corrugated abalone- size and color like rufescens, but nearly circular, high arched, thick externally, corrugated, 2 or 3 large holes, scar large and brilliant, southern. Haliotis assimilisWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis assimilis- threaded abalone, deep water, San DiegoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA to MontereyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Monterey, CA, large one 4 in. longa and 3 1/2 wide, 7 holes, exterior threaded like tapestry carpet, moderate furrow below holes, high arched, reddish out side, inside smooth silvery, no visible scar, thick, compact solid Haliotis giganteaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Haliotis gigantea-Japanese abalone-Central California to Aleutian Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Aleutian Islands , smaller southward, only 5 in. long, thin shell, sharp edge, spire prominent, surface uneven, 4 holes with high walls, interior very iridescent, light colors prevailing, scar not distinct.

Crepidula fornicataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula fornicata- Atlantic coast Crepidula onyxWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula onyx PanamaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Panama etc. Crepidula rugosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula rugosa- Cali. Largest on Cali. Coast, abundant ((CrucibulumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crucibulum)) Crepidula navicelloidesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula navicelloides- white, flat or irregular Crepidula lessoniWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula lessoni- like navicelloides, but long, narrow, thickened by several layers partly detached at edges. ((SentillinaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Sentillina)) Crepidula dorsataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula dorsata- small, flat circular, thin, wrinkled, brown and white, deck partly detached. Crepidula aculeata- low apex curved to one side, irregular radiating ribs, small, yellowish, white southern.
Crucibulum spinosum- cup and saucer
Calyptrate mamillaris- Chinese hat, white, low conical, pointed, small, deck twisted, mostly northern.
Capulus californicus- like Crepidula adunca but no deck, white inside, brown epidermis outside, 40 mm
Amalthea antiquata-ancient hoofshell, rough, irregular, flat, apex at one end.
Amalthea cranoides-flat hoofshell, like last but still flatter, apex near center
Amalthea tumens-much more regular, apex recurved, radial lines crossed by growth lines, small.
Chlorostoma brunneum-brown turban-brown, white about aperture, growth lines very oblique, umbilicus rather smooth ((Callistoma))
Chlorostoma aureotinctum-few spiral ridges, waved, gray or black, yellow umbilical stain ((Tegula))
Chlorostoma montereyi-very rare ((Tegula))
Chlorostoma pulligo- ((Tegula))
Chlorostoma viridulium ligulatum, raised beaded spiral bands, dotted with black ((Tegula))
Chlorostoma gallina-southern, mostly black, speckled with lighter ((Tegula))
Chlorostoma gallina, var. tinctum- yellowish at base ((Tegula))
Chlorostoma funebrale- black turban-black or dark purple, umbilicus nearly closed, 2 teeth at base of columella. ((Tegula))
Calliostoma, spp. Raised, often beaded lines, some spp. Small
Margarita – same as Calliostoma but smaller
Olivella biplicata- large
Olivella intorta- like above, smaller, on((e)) fold on columella
Olivella pedroana- tapering to spire
Cerithidea californica-on tideflats - Newport, Alamitos, San Pedro. Bivalves

Platyodon cancellatus-swollen beaks, spoon shaped tooth, finely cancellated exterior
Mytilus californianus- common ribbed mussel
Mytilus stearnsii- very small shell, numerous ribs
Modiolus capax- red under epidermis, Terminal ((Island))
Modiolus rectus- long, slender, fragile
Septifer bifurcatus-divided ribs, decks within beaks
Donax laevigata-beaks near end ((?Tellina))
Donax flexuosus-beaks more nearly central. ((?Tellina))
Tagelus californicus-long, narrow razor shell, beaks central, very abundant.
Siliqua lucida-small, beak nearer end, rib vertical within from beak to ventral edge
Solen sicorius-beak terminal
Solen rosaceus-beak terminal
Phacoides nuttallii-finely cancellated ((Lucina))
Phacoides californicus- not cancellated (Portuguese Bend) ((Codakia))
Mactra falcata- 2 internal radiating ribs, long, triangular, small, sinus thus ((drawing in field book)) ((Spisula))
Mactra californica- sinus shorter, wide thus ((drawing in field book)) ((Mactrellina))
Mactra exoleta- Mexican (Cali. Pleist.) sharply triangular, convex, elevated umbo, sharp submarginal posterior ridge.
Mactra hemphilli- large, triangular. Sinus ((drawing in field book))
Mactra catilliformis- oblong, large, sinus ((drawing in field book))
Tresus nuttallii- very large, oblong, spoon pit, big sinus, beak near end, largest except Tivella.
Heterodonax bimaculata-small, purple rayed, brackish water (at Alamitos)
Petricola-Irregular, rough, rock borers
Zirphaea crispata- rough at one end, large, common
Penitella penita-rough at one end, small, not common
Diplodonta orbella- round, inflates
Diplodonta sericata- round, less inflated
Metis alta- big sinus, double ridge posteriorly, abundant
Semele decisa- shape like above, rough, red at Terminal ((Island))
Saxidomus nuttallii-heavy, prominent growth wrinkle.
Glycimeris intermedia- Terminal Isl. many toothed
Cardium substriatum-small, nearly obsolete ribs-Terminal ((Island))
Cardium quadrigenarium- large 40 ribbed, ribs tuberculate on posterior angle
Cardium procerum-22 subangular, smooth ribs, narrow grooves between-angle nearer anterior side.
Cardium corbis-37 prominent, squarish, regular, close set ribs, slightly rugose by growth lines-ribs less prominent and rounder toward posterior side.
Cardium elatum- numerous faint, square ribs, fine wavy growth lines, very large, nearly smooth surface.
Tivela stultorum-large, heavy, short triangular sinus
Cryptomya californica- spoon tooth in one valve, shell small, oblong.
Lima dehiscens-small, oblique, narrow winged, finely ribbed as in Pteria
Pecten aequisulcatus- large, abundant
Pecten circularis-now lives only S of Cali.
Pecten latiauratus-thin, round. Common
Pecten (Hinnites) giganteus-large, heavy, irregular
Anomia lampe- radial ridges, common at Long Beach
Anomia limatula-southern, no radial sculpture
Ostrea lurida- common
Ostrea lurida expansa- circular
Ostrea lurida rugoides-red within
Monia macroschisma- like large heavy Anomia, green within, muscle scar radial ribbed
Chama exogyra- sinistral from above, not pellucid
Chama pellucida- dextral from above, pellucid
Psammobia-oblong, red rayed, sharp cardinal tooth with vertical raised plate back of it.
Macoma secta-large, with horizontal plate back of cardinal tooth, sinus large and irregular, posterior external ridge-common.
Macoma nasuta-smaller, no plate back of tooth posterior point bent back
Chione succinata- concentric ridges remote, prominent lunule with growth lines and radial ribs
Chione undatella- concentric ridges more numerous and regular, and more prominent than ribs, lunule not radially ribbed
Chione fluctifraga- surface blocked, no lunule, sinus small on this genus, cf. next
Paphia staminea- concentric and radial ridges about equal, cancellation beautiful
Paphia ruderata- concentric ridges much heavier than ribs
Paphia tenerrima- concentric and radial lines fine, sinus in this genus very long
Amiantis callosa- common, fine. Wednesday, June 8, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 8, 1910

Bright hot day. I marched with the commencement procession to the cars and rode up to Chatauqua GroundsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Chatauqua Grounds, then remained in the car instead of going to the auditorium, and came down and got ready to leave. I got my trunk off on the 8 a.m. train, checked to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA, and left on the 12:30 noon Interurban car. Express on trunk to depot - 25¢. Round trip Santa Fe Boulder - Los Angeles $51.20. Interurban Boulder to Denver 70¢. Sleeper Denver to Los Angeles $9.50. Very hot afternoon on train, cool toward evening. Reached Colorado SpringsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Colorado Springs at 6:30 and got dinner at Depot, 70¢. Changed cars at La JuntaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Junta, CO and got a very fine car, leaving at 10:45, making close connection. Got to bed at 11 p.m., very tired.

A long list of taxa

California TripsEdit

Treks to Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico

Bivalves

Platyodon cancellatus-swollen beaks, spoon shaped tooth, finely cancellated exterior
Mytilus californianus- common ribbed mussel
Mytilus stearnsii- very small shell, numerous ribs
Modiolus capax- red under epidermis, Terminal ((Island))
Modiolus rectus- long, slender, fragile
Septifer bifurcatus-divided ribs, decks within beaks
Donax laevigata-beaks near end ((?Tellina))
Donax flexuosus-beaks more nearly central. ((?Tellina))
Tagelus californicus-long, narrow razor shell, beaks central, very abundant.
Siliqua lucida-small, beak nearer end, rib vertical within from beak to ventral edge
Solen sicorius-beak terminal
Solen rosaceus-beak terminal
Phacoides nuttallii-finely cancellated ((Lucina))
Phacoides californicus- not cancellated (Portuguese Bend) ((Codakia))
Mactra falcata- 2 internal radiating ribs, long, triangular, small, sinus thus ((drawing in field book)) ((Spisula))
Mactra californica- sinus shorter, wide thus ((drawing in field book)) ((Mactrellina))
Mactra exoleta- Mexican (Cali. Pleist.) sharply triangular, convex, elevated umbo, sharp submarginal posterior ridge.
Mactra hemphilli- large, triangular. Sinus ((drawing in field book))
Mactra catilliformis- oblong, large, sinus ((drawing in field book))
Tresus nuttallii- very large, oblong, spoon pit, big sinus, beak near end, largest except Tivella.
Heterodonax bimaculata-small, purple rayed, brackish water (at Alamitos)
Petricola-Irregular, rough, rock borers
Zirphaea crispata- rough at one end, large, common
Penitella penita-rough at one end, small, not common
Diplodonta orbella- round, inflates
Diplodonta sericata- round, less inflated
Metis alta- big sinus, double ridge posteriorly, abundant
Semele decisa- shape like above, rough, red at Terminal ((Island))
Saxidomus nuttallii-heavy, prominent growth wrinkle.
Glycimeris intermedia- Terminal Isl. many toothed
Cardium substriatum-small, nearly obsolete ribs-Terminal ((Island))
Cardium quadrigenarium- large 40 ribbed, ribs tuberculate on posterior angle
Cardium procerum-22 subangular, smooth ribs, narrow grooves between-angle nearer anterior side.
Cardium corbis-37 prominent, squarish, regular, close set ribs, slightly rugose by growth lines-ribs less prominent and rounder toward posterior side.
Cardium elatum- numerous faint, square ribs, fine wavy growth lines, very large, nearly smooth surface.
Tivela stultorum-large, heavy, short triangular sinus
Cryptomya californica- spoon tooth in one valve, shell small, oblong.
Lima dehiscens-small, oblique, narrow winged, finely ribbed as in Pteria
Pecten aequisulcatus- large, abundant
Pecten circularis-now lives only S of Cali.
Pecten latiauratus-thin, round. Common
Pecten (Hinnites) giganteus-large, heavy, irregular
Anomia lampe- radial ridges, common at Long Beach
Anomia limatula-southern, no radial sculpture
Ostrea lurida- common
Ostrea lurida expansa- circular
Ostrea lurida rugoides-red within
Monia macroschisma- like large heavy Anomia, green within, muscle scar radial ribbed
Chama exogyra- sinistral from above, not pellucid
Chama pellucida- dextral from above, pellucid
Psammobia-oblong, red rayed, sharp cardinal tooth with vertical raised plate back of it.
Macoma secta-large, with horizontal plate back of cardinal tooth, sinus large and irregular, posterior external ridge-common.
Macoma nasuta-smaller, no plate back of tooth posterior point bent back
Chione succinata- concentric ridges remote, prominent lunule with growth lines and radial ribs
Chione undatella- concentric ridges more numerous and regular, and more prominent than ribs, lunule not radially ribbed
Chione fluctifraga- surface blocked, no lunule, sinus small on this genus, cf. next
Paphia staminea- concentric and radial ridges about equal, cancellation beautiful
Paphia ruderata- concentric ridges much heavier than ribs
Paphia tenerrima- concentric and radial lines fine, sinus in this genus very long
Amiantis callosa- common, fine. Wednesday, June 8, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 8, 1910

Bright hot day. I marched with the commencement procession to the cars and rode up to Chatauqua GroundsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Chatauqua Grounds, then remained in the car instead of going to the auditorium, and came down and got ready to leave. I got my trunk off on the 8 a.m. train, checked to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA, and left on the 12:30 noon Interurban car. Express on trunk to depot - 25¢. Round trip Santa Fe Boulder - Los Angeles $51.20. Interurban Boulder to Denver 70¢. Sleeper Denver to Los Angeles $9.50. Very hot afternoon on train, cool toward evening. Reached Colorado SpringsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Colorado Springs at 6:30 and got dinner at Depot, 70¢. Changed cars at La JuntaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Junta, CO and got a very fine car, leaving at 10:45, making close connection. Got to bed at 11 p.m., very tired. Santa Fe Road Thursday, June 9, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 9, 1910

Awoke at 6 a.m., somewhere in N. Mex.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg New Mexico Had a fine nights sleep. Breakfast on diner, strawberries, wheat cakes coffee and waiter 70¢. Lunch - fish, raspberries and ice cream, and waiter $1.10. About 2 p.m. we were stopped at GrantsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Grants, NM, in western [New] Mexico by a wreck 7 miles ahead. Started on at 5:20 2 h 58 m behind time. Dinner in diner American Plan at 6 p.m. $1.00. Hot through day and cool breeze toward evening. Retired at 10 p.m.

Santa Fe Road, June 10, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 10, 1910

Had a cool night and slept well. Arose at 6 a.m. having forgotten the change to Pacific time. Breakfast on diner strawberries, farina, toast, coffee 85¢. Mrs. Ella Davis Roberts, of Denver, formerly of Telluride and a friend of Mrs. Rohwer and a Mrs. La Forgue, had the berth opposite mine. Her husband is a physician and druggist. Reached Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA at 3:10 p. m., 40 minutes late. Nellie, Alice, Ina and Dr. Carter met me at train. Trunk did not arrive. Went out to Franks and spent afternoon and evening, Dr. Carter soon leaving for Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, and we reached Long beach about 10:45 p.m.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Saturday, June 11, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 11, 1910

Arose at 7:15 a.m. Bright, beautiful, very comfortable, Dr. carter and I walked up beach in forenoon and collected a few razor shellsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg razor shell and ModiolaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Modiolas. In afternoon Nellie and I called on S. H. Underwood, justice of the peace, a U. of C. law School graduate. At 3 p.m. we and Dr. Carter went to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA to visit my brothers and sisters.


Los Angeles, CaliCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA, Sunday June 12, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 12, 1910

Foggy morning, soon clearing up. Spent the entire day at Frank's house and returned to Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA in the evening. Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Monday June 13, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 13, 1910

Foggy morning, cloudy most of the day, quite warm about noon. I got my trunk and unpacked it.

[Timetable, Sand Diego to Los Angeles, on Santa Fe RR glued in here.] Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA Tuesday, June 14, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 14, 1910

Clear and warm most of day. Dr. Carter and I in forenoon walked nearly to Alamitos BayCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Alamitos Bay and collected shells etc. I took several pictures. In afternoon Nellie and I walked to northeast part of town to get photo of Signal HillCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Signal Hill.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Wednesday June 15, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 15, 1910

Clear most of day. In forenoon saw a “baby" elephant: taking bath in surf. In Afternoon tried to get a photo of San Pedro HillCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro Hill from end of pier, using color screen. In evening we went to band concert, then developed photos.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA Thursday June 16, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 16, 1910

Cloudy morning. Harl Kittle, with wife, Marjorie and Harlan arrived in their auto at 10 a.m. and Dan McAllister, with wife and Marion arrived on the electric car at 11 a.m. We all went to the wharf to see Little Hip, the young elephant, take his bath in the ocean, We all dined at the cafeteria. At 3 p.m. we all went into swimming pool and then into surf. The Kittles and McAllisters all left about 6:45 p.m. in the auto.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA Friday. June 17, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 17, 1910.

Very fine day, I remained at the house most of the day, nursing a toe which I skinned in the swimming pool yesterday.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CASaturday. June 18, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 18, 1910.

Cloudy morning. Arose at 6:45 a.m. Nellie and I took 9:30 train for E. San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, Los Angeles on Salt Lake Route. Train 10 minutes late. Fare one way 15¢ each. Ferry to San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, Los Angeles 5¢ each. Took Santa Rosa for San DiegoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA, fare one way $3.00 each, leaving San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, Los Angeles at 10:30 a.m. Boat is old and dirty. Sea rather calm. Saw fire and boat drill about 11:30 on upper deck. Had rather poor dinner at12:45 p.m. (included in fare). In afternoon saw a school of sharksWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg shark and a whaleWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg whale, but no more flying fishWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg flying fish. GullsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg gull left us after dinner. Picked up another lot off La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA. Reached San DiegoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA at about 5 p.m. and went to Jewett HotelCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Jewett Hotel, corner of 4th and A Streets, a neat, clean place, good room for two for $1.50 per day. In evening we went to Garrick TheatreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Garrick Theatre and saw " The Lion and the Mouse", a good play well presented. Supper at Opera CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria for two 49¢.

San Diego, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA, Sunday. June 19, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 19, 1910.

Up at 8 a.m. Bright, hot morning. Breakfast at Adventist "Vegetarian cafe", 30¢ for two. Walked W. to bay then north along shore. Found only dead Chione succinctaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione succincta and fluctifragaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione fructifraga, Tagelus californicusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Tagelus californicus, Paphia sp.Wikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Paphia, Ostrea luridaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ostrea lurida and var. expansaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ostrea lurida var. expansa, a very large Bulla gouldianaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Bulla gouldiana and numerous live Cerithidea californicaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cerithidea californica. Returned to hotel at noon, and at 1:30 dined at Opera CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria, 58¢ for the two of us. Cool sea breeze where not sheltered from it. Fruit 45¢.

San Diego, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA, Monday June 20, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 20, 1910.

Up at 7 a.m. Breakfasted in company with C. G. Buckingham and mother at Opera CafeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria, 70¢ for us two. Nellie and I then caught the 8:23 a.m. car at David and 3rd Sts. For Ocean BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ocean Beach, San Diego, at N end of Pt. LomaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Point Loma, San Diego, arriving there about 9 a.m. Surf there as fine as we have seen anywhere, several long white lines of surf as we looked northward. We collected some mollusksWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg mollusk and crustaceaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg crustacea, but could only follow beach a short distance, then had to take to the bluffs. Precipitous bluffs (sea cliffs) and rocky shore, deeply and sharply channeled, Did not succeed in getting back to the beach again until we reached Pt. LomaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Point Loma, San Diego lighthouse. We collected two species of land snailsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg land snail. All along the fences, W, NW and SW of the Theosophy buildings we found warnings against trespassing, but kept straight on through. Fried beefsteak and made coffee at noon. Reached lighthouse about 2 p.m. and were shown through by officer in charge. Collected shells on the beach there. At Ocean BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ocean Beach, San Diego the Littorina planaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Littorina plana are very large. Left the light house at 4:45, climbing the hill by a trail and striking an old road at the old Spanish lighthouse. Further along the government is building a boulevard, and the work made walking very hard. Reached RosevilleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Roseville-Fleetridge, San Diego at 7 p.m., very tired, and a Mr. And Mrs. Lucky, in a tent, got us a ham and egg supper for 70¢. Got at car for San DiegoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA at 8:35 and reached hotel shortly after nine. In air line our walk would be about 10 miles, but we really travelled about 15 miles, and they were very hard miles, crossing gulches, pushing through shrubbery and travelling in deep sand along roadways, and we carried heavy loads. Not sorry we went but glad we do not have to go again. The day has been ideal.

San Diego, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA, Tuesday June 21, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 21, 1910

Up at 7:30, both rather sore. Breakfast at restaurant on 6th St., toast, coffee and cantaloupe 40¢ for two of us. Fruit bread and jelly for lunch 40¢. Left hotel at 9;30, got car at 5th and D Sts. For ferry at 9:50, reached beach at Coronado Tent CityCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA at 10:30 and started down beach. Shells scarce. Lunched at noon. Partly cloudy, breezy. Went on at 12:45. Turned back at 2 p.m. Then I walked to Spanish BightCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA and got a few fossil Amiantis callosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Amiantis callosa and one fossil sand dollarWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg sand dollar at foot of bluff. We reached our hotel at 5:50 p.m. Car fare to ferry from our hotel and back in evening 10¢ each. Ferry round trip 10¢ each. Car fare from ferry to Tent CityCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA and return 10¢ each total 60¢. Dinner at Opera CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria for two 60¢. Then we went to Queen TheatreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Queen Theatre and saw Little Hip, the "baby" elephant perform. The sand spit on which CoronadoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA is located is evidently a "raised beach". Tivela stultorumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Tivela stultorum and Donax laevigataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax laevigata occur in great numbers in the sand dunes, with a few Chione fluctifragaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione fluctifraga etc. On the beach of the ocean side found very few of the TivelaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Tivela stultorum, more DonaxWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax laevigataand no ChioneWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione fluctifraga. At CoronadoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA found 21 Acmaea unitaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Acmaea unita and several of the rough white keyhole limpets, one Modiolus rectusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Modiolus rectus, several Mytilus californicusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Mytilus californicus, a few Periploma planisculaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Periploma planiscula, Macoma sp.Wikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Macoma, Platyodon cancellatusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Platyodon cancellatus, Zirphaea crispataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Zirphaea crispata, Pecten latiauritusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pecten latiauritus. On the bay beach we found Chione fluctifragaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione fluctifraga, CerithideaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cerithidea, abundant Melampus olivaceusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Melampus olivaceus, a few Heterodonax bimaculatusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Heterodonax bimaculatus and one or two Paphia sp.Wikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Paphia Except at Tent CityCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA, the ocean beach of this beach has no shells except TivelaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Tivela and DonaxWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax.

San Diego, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA, Wednesday June 22, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 22, 1910.

Arose at 7 a.m. Cloudy, soon clearing. I breakfasted at Opera CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria, 20¢, Nellie not being up yet. Then I took car and ferry to 10th st., CoronadoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA and walked to bluff N. of Spanish BightCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado, CA, where I collected fossils at base of bluff. Amiantis callosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Amiantis callosa and Dentalium spp.Wikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Dentalium were very abundant. Got quite a lot of species. Started back at 12:30 m. Fossils very abundant in a two foot horizon at base of bluff, occurring in masses. Saw none above. At 2 p.m. Nellie and I had dinner at Opera CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria, 62¢. Nellie's breakfast 20¢. At 3 p.m. we took Logan HeightsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Logan Heights, San Diego car on 5th for foot of 26th St., where we collected AnomiaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Anomia, OstreaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ostrea, DosiniaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Dosinia etc. Returned at 6:30 p.m. to hotel. At foot of 26th St., the AnomiaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Anomia horizon is 12 or 15 ft. above the water, with a clamWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg clam horizon lower down and an oysterWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg oyster horizon at the base, forming the beach of the bay. Up the beach we did not find any AnomiaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Anomia, the Pleistocene beds having been eroded away, and about 10 ft of loose soil forming the greater part of the bluff.

Thus [NW-SE sectional drawing in field book].


San Diego, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Diego, CA, Thursday June 23, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 23, 1910.

Up at 6:30. Breakfast at Opera CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Opera Cafeteria, 55¢ for both of us. Cotton 15¢ Got a box and finished packing our specimens. The box contains only material from foot of 26th st., all fossil. The other material and a few 26th st. fossils fill one of the suit cases, the other containing our clothes. All these are to be expressed to Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA. Key for suit case 25¢. Tips to bell boys for expressing stuff, etc. 50¢. Left on 9 o'clock motor car, corner of 4th and C, for La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA. Two tickets for BraemarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Braemar, San Diego 60¢, but got off at Pacific BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pacific Beach, San Diego and started south to round the point which juts into False bayCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg False Bay, San Diego. On east side of this cape we found old kitchen middensWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg midden crowning the bluffs, containing chiefly PectenWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pecten and ChioneWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione, but with numerous Pomaulax undosusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosus. At the point we struck a shell conglomerate, mostly Donax laevigataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax laevigata, probably Pliocene, at base of bluff and following around to west side, found it extending higher up the bluff (dip being south) and containing great numbers of sand starsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Astropecten, of which we collected 60 or 70.At north end of bluff we packed out stuff, the fossils making one bag full. Also had a lot of recent land snailsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg land snail and Bulla gouldianaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Bulla gouldiana. Then we ate dinner and took two pictures. Continued due west to the ocean and turned north, where we found within a short distance a Pleistocene horizon containing many species, of which we collected quite a lot. They were small species. The strata dipped south. A few rods further up the beach we found the Pecten expansusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pecten expansus and OpaliaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Opalia horizon and collected a lot. Proceeding north up the beach the bluffs got higher and we got into lower horizons, the dip being perhaps 5 or 10° S., but no more fossils. Got some recent Pomaulax undosusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosus. Left the beach at Bird RockCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Bird Rock, San Diego and walked to La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA, where we got a room at Cabrilla HotelCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Cabrilla Hotel at 5 p.m., very hot and tired. Had a tremendous load. At 6 p.m. we dined at the "Brown Bear"Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg "Brown Bear", $1.00 for the two of us. After dinner I wrapped our fossils and got them ready for packing.

La Jolla, Colo.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA ((clearly Henderson meant 'Cali.')), Friday. June 24, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 24, 1910.

Up at 7:20, breakfast at private boarding house 60¢ for the two of us. We then walked to the new marine biological station, a mile or two up the beach. None of the staff were there, so at 11 oclock Nellie started back to the hotel. I started later and caught up with her just as she reached town. We went to the old biological station, met Prof. Torrey, of the University of California, and Prof. Childs, of Chicago, Prof. And Mrs. Ritter not being there. At 12:30 we dined at the Crescent CafeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Crescent Cafe, in the bath house, 50¢ each. It was an excellent meal. Then we bought some ham, fruit and 4 cantaloupes for 65¢ and packed the specimens for shipment. At 3:30 p.m. we started down the beach and collected a large number of small specimens, including several species of limpetsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg limpet, CrepidulaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula and AmaltheaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Amalthea. Returned at 6 p.m. and turned our boxes over to Holsten's Transfer Co.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Holsten's Transfer Co., to be expressed by Wells Fargo Express tomorrow. Transfer charges 15¢. Lunched (sic) at Crescent CafeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Crescent Cafe, 75¢ including waiter. After lunch, a local band played on the corner near the hotel. It was the worst music I ever heard. La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA is a beautiful place with a number of fine homes. The sea cliff is very precipitous, with short stretches of sandy beach at the base. The sandstones are much faulted without much vertical displacement, and jointed, and along the fault and joint planes the waves have cut deep, narrow, sharply defined channels, some only two or three feet wide being 15 or more feet in depth and extending for 50 feet or more into the sea wall. There are numerous arches and caves from the same cause. Has been cloudy most of the day.

La Jolla, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla, CA, Saturday June 25, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 25, 1910

Up at 6 a.m. Breakfasted at Crescent CafeCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Crescent Cafe in Bathhouse, $1.00. Hotel bill $3.00. Started at 7:40 north with our packs. After passing new biological station the sea cliff is high and precipitous for miles, with an occasional ravine opening back into it. Most of the way there is a beach. Only had to run around one point between the waves. About 3 miles north of the biological station we found many Owl limpetsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lottia gigantea on the rocks. A mile or two south of the Torrey pinesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pinus torreyana we collected large, heavy fossil oystersWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg oyster which form several layers at the foot of the cliff and 30 to 40 feet above. I suppose they are Tertiary. Further down coast we had noticed a marked unconformity in the bluff. Lunched at 11:30 p.m. (sic) still cloudy. Took 2 pictures of the bluff with fossil horizon at base, then started on, reaching Del MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, CA at 3 p.m. and got room at Stratford InnCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Stratford Inn. I went to the Post Office store, packed the fossils etc. in a box, addressed it and took it to the express office, where I left it in the hallway, the agent being absent. The postmaster promised to see that it is shipped. Got a 50¢ black and white striped shirt. My khaki coat is badly discolored from the dye sweating out of my black suspenders. We had dinner served in our room as we looked too "tacky" to go into the dining room at so swell a place. Tip for bell boy 25¢. The inlet shown on the U.S.G.S. topographic sheet at the mouth of the Soledad ValleyCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Soledad Valley which I feared would give us trouble, is not now an inlet at all. It seems above the highest tides and there was no water coming from the valley. Along the north edge of the valley the Santa Fe R.R.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway is grading a new line to run along the top of the bluff. Passed the Torrey pinesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pinus torreyana before we knew it. Cloudy all day.

Del Mar, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, San Diego, Sunday June 26, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 26, 1910.

Expected to stay here over Sunday, but the hotel is too fine for our rough and dirty khaki clothes, so concluded to go on. Had breakfast served in our room at 8:45. Nellie left for OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA on the 9:23 a.m. train. Then I started on foot up the beach with my pack. Reached EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA at 12:45 and went to the Derby HouseCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Derby House for dinner. A very decent looking village hotel. Del Mar hotel bill $5.50 and 25¢ for bell boy who brought our breakfast. From Del MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, San Diego to EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA the most common shell was Donax laevigataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax laevigata, next was Pecten cancellatusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pecten cancellatus. Pecten latiauritusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pecten latiauritus is also common and numbers of Pomaulax undosusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosus occur- dead shells above high tide. Other species were not common. Cloudy again today. A fair country hotel dinner 50¢. Found the same fossil oysterWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg oyster horizon at base of sea cliff at EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA that we collected from further south yesterday. Nellie's fare Del MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, San Diego to OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA 60¢. My fare EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA to OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA 40¢. Left EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA at 3 p.m. on train. Nellie met me at depot and took me to room she had found. At 5:30 we supped at a restaurant, 70¢. Retired at 7:20 p.m., very tired. Oceanside, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA, Monday, June 27, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 27, 1910.

Arose at 6 a.m. Breakfasted at restaurant, 70¢. Started south along beach at 7:10 a.m., without our packs. Sandy beach often up to the foot of the sea cliff, though usually there is a pebble zone above the sandy beach. In the pebble zone we found many Pomaulax undosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosa, with a few other shells. On the sandy beach there were not many shells except Donax laevigataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax laevigata. Live Tivela stultorumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Tivela stultorum are not uncommon. Reached EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA at 1:10, distance 12 miles. Dined at derby House, $1.00. Distances walked to present date:

==Edit

Ocean BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Ocean Beach, San Diego to RosevilleCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Roseville-Fleetridge, San Diego via Point LomaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Point Loma, San Diego about 15 miles Coronado BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Coronado Beach 12 Pacific BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pacific Beach, San Diego around bay shore to Ocean, thence to La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla 9 At La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla 8 La JollaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg La Jolla to Del MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, San Diego 11 Del MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, San Diego to EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA (Nellie went on train) 7 OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA to EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA12

==Edit

74

Expenses up to present date: ((here follows a detailed listing of expenses which is not really pertinent)) Expenses up to present date: ((Here follows a detailed listing of expenses which is not really pertinent.))

Left EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CAfor OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA on 3 p.m. train, fare 80¢. Supped at restaurant 70¢. Ice cream and postcards, 30¢. Sunshine for a little while in afternoon. Retired at 7:30.

Oceanside, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA, Tuesday, June 28, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 28, 1910.

Up at 7:10. Breakfast at restaurant 70¢. Started north without packs at 8:45. Shells not numerous. Lunched at noon about 4 miles up beach. Lots of fragments of Polynices lewisiiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Polynices lewisii but not one good specimen. Fruit etc. for lunch 15¢. Left beach and walked S to a station, but found is was Stuart, not a regular flag station, so had to walk about 3 miles N. to Las FloresCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores Estancia to be sure of a train. This is a regular flag station. It made the total distance walked today fully 12 miles. The beach was the same as from Del MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Del Mar, San Diego to OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA, gentle sandy slope headed by coarse pebble or boulder stretch at foot of bluffs. These pebbles are from 2 to 6 inches in diameter, piled into a steep wall. Where valleys break through the cliff, fine barrier bars of boulders have been formed all along this coast and in some places several parallel narrow bars. Got a train back at 4:42. There was a noticeable absences of Pomaulax undosusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosus. Fragments of Polynices lewisiiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Polynices lewisii abundant. Supper 70¢. Hot salt bath 50¢. Ice cream, candy and lemonade 55¢. Nails 5¢. Cotton and paper tablet 25¢. Packed two boxes of specimens. Retired at 9 p.m.

Oceanside, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA, Wednesday June 29, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 29, 1910.

Up at 7:30. Supper 70¢. Fixing shoes 10¢. Sun shining hazily this forenoon. Left on 10:02 train for Las FloresCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores Estancia, fare 50¢. At Las FloresCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores Estancia, we started up the track, then crossed on a wagon road to the beach, then north up beach. Shells not abundant except Donax laevigataWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax laevigata, which thickly strewed the beach. Good walking for first half, after which the beach became steep and of soft sand, the hard beaten sand being covered by the surf, but with a good cow trail for the last two miles at the foot of the cliff. Cliff nearly vertical, with hard sandstone unconformably overlaid by coarse conglomerate about 100 feet thick, with some deep gulches dissecting it. The last two miles DonaxWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax disappeared but ChioneWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chione were fairly common. Found two colonies of rock boring pelecypodaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg pelecypoda. Reached San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach at 3:16 p.m., having left Las Flores StationCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores Estancia at 10:30 a.m. and stopped about 45 minutes for lunch. Caught the 4:28 train from San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach to OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA, $1.10. Got a box to finish packing our specimens 5¢. We are also expressing some clothes, frying pans etc., to lighten our packs. We now have 4 boxes packed for shipment from here. Supper at restaurant 70¢. Ice cream, lemonade and candy 50¢. After supper we called on Mrs. Fulton and her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. And Mrs. Sloan. Clear at bedtime.

Oceanside, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA, Thursday, June 30, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg June 30, 1910.

Up at 7 a.m. Cloudy, soon clearing. Breakfast at restaurant 70¢. Fruit, sardines etc. for lunch 45¢. Express on 4 boxes, 110 pounds, to Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA $1.40. Mrs. Maggie Stoker, room for 4 days $2.00. Tickets to San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach $1.10. Between Las FloresCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores Estancia and San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach we passed through a bean field several miles long and extending from the sea cliff at least half a mile back. Left OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA at 10:16 a.m., 14 minutes late, Reached San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach at 10:43 and started up beach with packs on our backs. Better beach for walking than yesterday, but shells scarce. Very few DonaxWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Donax or PlatyodonWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Platyodon. About 2 miles up there are boulders harboring many marine snails. Found one live Pomaulax undosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosa, very large. Lunched opposite San Mateo rocks at 12:30, starting on at 1:05. The tide forced us up the beach to the steep, soft sand, and as there were no shells. We finally took to the railroad track and wagon road, which parallel the shore along the flat which intervenes between the sea cliff and the shore. This flat extends from San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach to Sera (sic), running from a few rods to several hundred yards in width. Reached Serra (San Juan) at 4 p.m. and went up the valley nearly to CapistranoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Juan Capistrano, CA (which is 3 miles from Serra) where we stopped for the night at the ranch of Mrs. Barnes, This is a beautiful valley, devoted chiefly to walnutWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Juglans growing and appears quite productive. It has been a hot, bright day, but with a fair sea breeze along the shore. Capistrano, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Juan Capistrano, CA, Friday, July 1, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 1, 1910.

Up at 6:45. Cloudy, cloudy, clearing about 10 a.m. At 8:30 Mrs. Barnes took us in a wagon to Dana PointCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Dana Point, California, where we reached the beach at 9:30 and began our tramp up the beach at low tide. Collected a great deal of small stuff, mostly gastropodsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Gastropoda. Only a few chitonsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg chiton and no large limpetsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg limpet. Pomaulax undosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Pomaulax undosa not common. About 6 miles south of LagunaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Laguna Beach, CA (at 3 arches) we had to leave the beach and take to the road back on the bluffs on account of inability to pass the numerous rocky points and the great labor of carrying the packs up and down the bluffs. Reached LagunaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Laguna Beach, CA at 5 p.m. and got a room at the hotel. Very tired. Retired about 8 p.m.

Laguna, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Laguna Beach, CA, Saturday July 2, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 2, 1910.

Up at 7 a.m. Cloudy, cool. Shipped my big pack full of stuff by auto stage (thence by express) to Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, to lighten our load. Charges 25¢. Started on foot at 8:30 a.m. Beach rocky, but we only had to leave it and climb the cliffs twice, first to pass Abalone PointCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Abalone Point, Laguna Beach, CA, and then a mile or two below the entrance to Newport bayCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Newport Beach, California. Reached Ferry at 3:13 p.m. Few bivalvesWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg bivalve yesterday or today except MytilusWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Mytilus, ChamaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Chama and LucinaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Lucina, and few Crepidula rugosaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crepidula rugosa or CrucibulumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Crucibulum, but at approach to Newport bayCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Newport Beach, California we found the same fauna as at Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA. Caught the 4:05 p.m. car for Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA at 4:20, 15 minutes late, changing cars at ZaferiaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Zaferia, Long Beach, to the Redondo Ave. car, and arriving at Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA at about 5:10, fare 70¢. Hotel at LagunaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Laguna Beach, CA $3.00.

Distance walked continued from June 27: Miles Brought forward 74 EncinitasCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Encinitas, CA to OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA 12 OceansideCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Oceanside, CA to Las FloresCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores, Estancia with extra 4 miles 12 Las FloresCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Las Flores, Estancia to San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach 10 San OnofreCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Onofre State Beach to CapistranoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Juan Capistrano 12 CapistranoCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Juan Capistranoto Serra rode in wagon Serra to LagunaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Laguna Beach, CA 12 LagunaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Laguna Beach, CAto BalboaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Balboa Park (San Diego) 10 Total 142 Refunded $3.10 express to Dr. Carter. ((Herewith more detailed accounts)) Found sister Alice and her friend, Miss Brookman, staying at the Krosnest. [this page contains a listing of train stops between Los Angeles, Santa Ana and San Diego] Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Sunday, July 3, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 3, 1910.

Bright day. We stayed home all day except to go out for dinner. In evening we went down to the water front. Found tide high, with heavy surf. The pier and "roller coaster" are so much damaged that they have been closed by the city authorities.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Monday, July 4, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 4, 1910.

Bright and hot all day. A noisy fourth of July here, and big crowd. Brother Henry came down and Nellie and I went to the tennis tournament with him in afternoon. Found Frank there and later Alice and her friend joined us at our rooms and we all went to dinner together at Shoup's, afterwards watching the fireworks. A section of the pier was carried away in heavy seas in the late afternoon. The news of Jeffrey's defeat by Johnson was received in the afternoon. I suspect that this may be the last big American prize fight. Folks returned to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA on late car.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Tuesday July 5, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 5, 1910.

Bright morning. I took a picture of the damaged pier. In afternoon I walked to Alamitos BayCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Alamitos Bay and back, collecting some shells. Very hot. In evening developed pictures.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Wednesday July 6, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 6, 1910.

Very bright and hot. In afternoon, Nellie and I went to MiramarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Miramar, San Diego, east of town, for fossils. Last year we collected Pleistocene fossils at the foot of the bluff east of the easternmost stairway. Collected some more at the same place. Also, west of the stairway we found a similar horizon, probably contemporaneous, full of fossils, underlaid by a great bed of oystersWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg oyster, two or three feet in thickness and partially cemented together. Collected a fine lot. Still warm at bedtime.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Thursday July 7, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 7, 1910.

Another bright, hot day. In afternoon, Nellie and I went to Terminal IslandCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Terminal Island on the 2:14 Salt Lake Train, returning at 6:30. Got a fine collection of shells, fare 50¢.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Friday July 8, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 8, 1910.

First cloudy morning for a week. In afternoon Dr. Carter and I went to Terminal IslandCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Terminal Island and got a very fine lot of shells including CardiumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cardium etc. Mrs. Neil Lagard of North DakotaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg North Dakota gave us some fine specimens, and Mrs. Louisa Shattuck of Terminal IslandCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Terminal Island gave us some very delicate shells not to be found usually on the beaches. During our absence the Ricketts girls called on Nellie. Fine, cool day. Got a new suit of clothes, $25.00. Fare to terminal and return, 50¢ for two.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Saturday July 9, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 9, 1910.

Fine day. Stayed at the house nearly all day.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Sunday {{dated}1910-07-10|July 10, 1910}}.

Cloudy morning, soon clearing. Beautiful day. Nellie and I went to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA on 10 a.m. flyer and spent day at Frank's. Reached Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, at 9 p.m. Have had swollen gums yesterday and today. Have been treating them with dioxygen and compound tincture of benzoin.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, July 11, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 11, 1910. Monday.

Beautiful day, fine cool, breeze. Nellie and I went to AlamitosCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Alamitos Bay in afternoon and got a good collection. Also took a row in the bay. The oystersWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg oyster from the bay appear to be all the circular form O.l. expansaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ostrea lurida expansa, while those on the ocean side are the long form O. luridaWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Ostrea lurida.


Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA Tuesday July 12, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 12, 1910.

Cloudy morning. I arose at 5 a.m. and walked to Mira MarCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Miramar, San Diego. Tide was low and I got some fine specimens, including a very large hermit crabWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg hermit crab in shell of Polynices lewisiiWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Polynices lewisii, flexible coralsWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg coral, several moonshells (P. lewisii)Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Polynices lewisii etc. Met a doctor from Harvard, Neb.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Harvard, NE, on the beach who assisted me to get a big fossil Cardium quadrigenariumWikispecies-logo.svgCommons-logo.svg Cardium quadrigenarium half way up the bluff. Returned about 9 a.m. and spent balance of forenoon preparing and packing the material collected this morning. Cleared up before noon. John Kennedy, Wife and daughter called in forenoon, having just arrived from PomonaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Pomona, CA. Saw D. E. Dobbins at Kennebec CafeteriaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Kennebec Cafeteria at noon. In afternoon Nellie and I went to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA. I got some dry-plates. Nellie called on Mrs. Kerr and her mother and we returned on the evening train. After supper we went to band concert with the Kennedys.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Wednesday July 13, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 13, 1910

Cloudy morning, cleared up before noon. In the forenoon Nellie and I went into the ocean and plunge with the Kennedys. In the afternoon Dr. carter went to Los AngelesCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Los Angeles, CA, returning in evening, and Kennedys supped here. Skinned my knuckles and foot diving in the plunge. Had teeth scraped at dentist's.

Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Thursday, July 14, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 14, 1910.

Cloudy, clearing in forenoon. Foot quite sore, so I stayed home most of day and studied Spanish. (( Here follows a pasted in time table of the "Salt Lake Route")) Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Friday, July 15, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 15, 1910.

Bright clear morning and hot forenoon. On account of sore foot stayed home all forenoon studying Spanish. In afternoon Nellie and I went to Santa AnaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Ana, CA via WattsCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Watts, Los Angeles, to visit the Kittles, reaching there at 4:40 p.m. Hot day.

Santa Ana, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Ana, CA, Saturday July 16, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 16, 1910.

Bright and hot all day. Unoiled roads very dusty. The Kittles had the Strocks over to breakfast in honor of Nellie's birthday. In afternoon we all went to Kittle's ranch in the auto. In evening the women went to motion picture show and Harl and I stayed at Carl Strock's store and listened to the phonograph.

Santa AnaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Ana, CA, Sunday, July 17, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 17, 1910.

Bright morning but became cloudy by 7 a.m. "High fog", they call it in California where they do not admit cloudy days. Heard thunder during forenoon. Dined at Strock'sCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Strock's. Started for Long BeachCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA at 6:05 p.m. While at Santa AnaCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Santa Ana, CA we saw a 17000 acre beanfield on a 100,000 acre ranch.

Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Monday, July 18, 1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 18, 1910.

From 6:45 to 8 a.m. one peal of thunder followed another in rapid succession. At 7:30 it began to rain, continuing until after 10 a. m. and sprinkling fitfully until nearly noon. Said to have been the first July rain here for 16 years. Afternoon clear. I remained at home all day nursing my sore foot. In evening, Dr. Mabie, a Baptist minister who has at different times been located at RockfordCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Rockford, IL, BoulderCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Boulder, CO and MarshalltownCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Marshalltown, IA, the only towns in which Nellie has lived, called to spend the evening. Truly this is a small world after all. Here he is now, temporarily located in the same town with her in another state, making 4 towns in 4 states.


Long Beach, Cali.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Long Beach, CA, Tuesday, July 19,1910Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg July 19, 1910.

Bright, hot morning. Arose at 7 a.m. Started for East San PedroCommons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg San Pedro, Los Angeles on 9:30 a.m. Salt Lake train, Nellie, the Ricketts girls and I. Got boat from La Marr and rowed to Deadman Isl.Commons-logo.svgOpenstreetmap logo.svg Deadman Island At ladder on N end of island the lowest bluff is Pliocene, the slope is lower San Pedro Pleistocene unconformable on Pliocene, upper bluff is upper San Pedro Pleistocene, above which is soil, in places filled with Pecten aequisulcatus