Page:A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Confederacy, Including the Diplomatic Correspondence, 1861-1865, Volume I.djvu/451

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421
First Congress.

That the thanks of Congress are due, and are tendered, to General Robert E. Lee and to the officers and soldiers of the Confederate armies under his command, for the great and signal victories they have won over the vast hosts of the enemy, and for the inestimable services they have rendered in defense of the liberty and independence of our country.

Resolved, That the President be requested to communicate these resolutions to General Robert E. Lee, and to the officers and soldiers herein designated.

Approved January 8, 1864.


Whereas, Major Heros von Borcke, of Prussia, Adjutant and Inspector General of the cavalry corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, having left his own country to assist in securing the independence of ours, and by his personal gallantry in the field having won the admiration of his comrades as well as that of his commanding general, all of whom deeply sympathize with him in his present sufferings from the wounds received in battle: Therefore,

Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are due, and the same are hereby tendered, to Major von Borcke for his self-sacrificing devotion to our Confederacy, and for his distinguished services in support of its cause.

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be transmitted to Major von Borcke by the President of the Confederate States.

Approved January 30, 1864.


Whereas, the Congress of the Confederate States have received, with the liveliest emotions, the cheering intelligence that a large portion of the Tennessee troops composing the Army of Tennessee, under the command of General Joseph E. Johnston, have tendered their services to the country during the war; it is, therefore,

Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are hereby cordially given to the gallant soldiers of Tennessee, who have, in advance of the legislation of Congress, and before their three years' term of service had