Page:Barnes (1879) Poems of rural life in the Dorset dialect (combined).djvu/249

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THE LINDEN ON THE LAWN.

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There yonder poplar trees do plaÿ
Soft music, as their heads do swaÿ,
While wind, a-rustlèn soft or loud,
Do stream ageän their lofty sh’oud;
An’ seem to heal the ranklèn zore
My mind do meet wi’ out o’ door,
When I’ve a-bore, in downcast mood,
Zome evil where I look’d vor good.

O’ they two poplars that do rise
So high avore our naïghbours’ eyes,
A-zet by gramfer, hand by hand,
Wi’ grammer, in their bit o’ land;
The woone upon the western zide
Wer his, an’ woone wer grammer’s pride,
An’ since they died, we all do teäke
Mwore ceäre o’m vor the wold vo’k’s seäke.

An’ there, wi’ stems a-growèn tall
Avore the houses mossy wall,
The while the moon ha’ slowly past
The leafy window, they’ve a-cast
Their sheädes ’ithin the window peäne;
While childern have a-grown to men,
An’ then ageän ha’ left their beds,
To bear their childern’s heavy heads.

THE LINDEN ON THE LAWN.

No! Jenny, there’s noo pleäce to charm
My mind lik’ yours at Woakland farm,
A-peärted vrom the busy town,
By longsome miles ov aïry down,
Where woonce the meshy wall did gird

Your flow’ry geärden, an’ the bird