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MISSIONS


377


MISSIONS


and orphans. It is also advisable to specify the teaching staff (European and native) and the num- ber of pupils receiving instruction in handicrafts and agriculture. A seminary, if such exists, should re- ceive special mention, since it has an important bear- ing on the formation of a native priesthood. Other institutions may be given imder one head, as in many cases one building serves for various purposes.

(4) Adminisirative Statistics. — The figures dealing with the actual ministry of the missionaries are of course the surest indication of the progress of Chris- tianity. In giving the number of baptisms, adults should always be tlistinguished from children, the


ever, the word mission is confined to the work of bringing pagans into the Church. In view of this difference in the use of the term mission, our statistics will contain a statement of the present condition of (1) the Catholic missions in lands prevailingly or ex- clusively pagan, and (2) the Catholic missions in lands which have been won to Christianity since the Refor- mation. .\s the negroes of the United States are ad- mitted into the statistics of Protestant missions, the inclusion of this second class is necessary to supply a imiform basis of comparison between Catholic and non-Catholic missionary activity.

With reference to the accompanying table it may be


CATHOLIC MISSIONS


Auxiliaries



Chief and

STATIONS


CttlPELS


Schools


Pupils


Chari- table

Institu- tions


Baptisms


Religious Women


Catechists


Ordinarj-


Orphan3


Adult Heathens


Children inEi-


Catholic Children


416 3.S46* 3,169*

408 2,933 1,224*


314*

6,992*

1,914

75


287 ■ 13,046 5,081

156 4,677 1,713

176


291 6,025 4,475 76 4,980 1,769

176


113* 4,821 3,138 96 3.636 1,090

153


6.389* 118,013 90,325 9,285 212,944 67,118*


2.097 23,380 14,038 588 11,586

1.962


22 234


5,757 71,963 13,680*

16,i27


4,194 76,808* 28,120


4.230 34,568*


11,996*

531*

1,667 323 304 969 405*


592*

2,565 338

1.329*


25,136

547*

258

1,569(?)

334

200

1,341*


17,792

553*

269

1,3S4(?)

228

230

1,307*


13,047*

497*

299

1,210*

337

191

1,355*


504,074*

20,634*

17,021

66,872

19,071*

17,717*

73,132*


53,651*

959*

952*

6,996*

1,673*

482*

173(?)


11* 211* 96* 33* 23(?)





3,668* 435* 263*

391


4,232*


3,702* 418* 284

306


3,418* 340* 282 75 197


3,392* 299* 265 134 72


193,813*

18,898* 35,071* 9,050* 6,240*


10,276*


374*

12* 24


1,081* 468*



4,735* 1,395*


1,089*



1,008*


894*


770


69.259*







17,284*



30,393*


22,657*


17,706*


787.780*










1 .. i









..I .. 1



■■




number baptized in artindo mortis being given in both cases. The nimiber of Easter and of devotional com- munions (given separately) are of special importance as indicating approximately the number of C"nris- tians who have reached the use of reason and the fervour of religious life. Such concrete figures give a better idea of'the spirituality of the newly-converted than long dissertations on their zeal. Naturally, explanations of local conditions must accompany the figures, which might otherwise lead to miscon- ception.

IV. St.\tistics of the Catholic Missions. — In dealing with mission statistics, it is a matter of the ut- most importance to make clear from the first in what precise sense the word mission is to be imderstood. In canon law the term signifies all districts which are sub- ject to the Congregation of Propaganda, and it might thus include territories (e. g., until November, 1908, England and the I'nited States) with which the idea of mission is never associated in ordinary- speech. We also find two clearly defined meanings commonly assigned to the word bv popular usage. By mission- ary 'activity is often understood all efforts directed to- wards the propagation of the Faith, whether among heathens or among non-Catholics; more usually, how-


stated that the imperfect state of the figures available and considerations of space render it impossible to in- cludeall the particulars above advocated. Anasterisk denotes that the returns are incomplete. No figures have been given where returns for a very small per- centage of the missions are available. For fuller in- formation the reader is referred to the works cited in the bibliography and to the articles on the various countries in The C.\tholic En-cyclopedi.^.

HtTONDER, Der einheimische Klerus in den H ridenltlndrrn (Frei- burg, 1909); Idem. Deutsche Jesuitenm\"t '• ■'•• '" •I'irt IS.

JaAr/iunrferls (Freiburg, 1899); Idem, A'-' 'lischc

il/i..istonsa;mo.5en (Freiburg, 1910); Krosi '. «ion.i-

slalistik (Freiburg, 1908); Stockleis, Cir I'liUer-

hand Nachrichten deren Missionaren S. J. (.\...; : ..:^. ..-.,, Kal- K4B. Den kathol. Missions-Hislorie (CopenhugLn, ISJGj. IIazart. ker'kriijke Historie care de gehrele wereldt (4 vols.. Antwerp. 1667- 711; Hahn. Geachichle der kalhol. Mifnrmen (5 vols.. Colo 18o7-<)5) ; Mcllbauer. Geschichle ■!.' in dien (Freiburg, 1852) ; LocvET. /.. .Sac(e(Lvons,1894);DELPLACE. /.. ' Brussels, 1909-10) ; Suau, LaFr<v. PlOLET, Les Missions CaMo/if^uc"; /. .;..,.

vols Paris s d ); I^e Blant, Lc.s mar/;/- .. ..^ , ^ - —

les persiciu'ions antiques (Arras, 1877); Launat, llistoircfnHaU de la SociHl des Missions Etrangires (3 vols.. Pans, 1894); HEN- BION Hisloire des Missions Calholiques (Paris. 1847) ; Louvbt, La Cochinehine religieuse (2 vols., Paris, 1885) ; Depierre, Silualion du Calholicisme en Cochinehine A la fin du XIX' Siicle (Saigon, 1900); Missions Dominicain€s_da7is Veztrime Onent (2 vela.,


logne, ■^ifmcminOslin- luiuesauXIX' 1 Japon (2 vols., (Paris, 1910); A IX- Sihle (6 VEilrtme-Onent et