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UNITED STATES

89

UNITED STATES

POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES, BY STATES: 1920, 1910, AND 1900—Continued.


State Population Increase[1]
1910-1920
Increase[1]
1900-1910



1920 1910 1900 Number Per
cent.
Number Per
cent.








Missouri 3,404,055  3,293,335  3,106,665  110,720  3.4  186,670  6.0 
Montana 548,889  376,053  243,329  172,836  46.0  132,724  54.5 
Nebraska 1,296,372  1,192,214  1,066,300  104,158  8.7  125,914  11.8 
Nevada 77,407  81,875  42,335  −4,468  −5.5  39,540  93.4 
New Hampshire 443,083  430,572  411,588  12,511  2.9  18,984  4.6 
New Jersey 3,155,900  2,537,167  1,883,669  618,733  24.4  653,498  34.7 
New Mexico 360,350  327,301  195,310  33,049  10.1  131,991  67.6 
New York 10,386,227  9,113,614  7,268,894  1,271,613  14.0  1,844,720  25.4 
North Carolina 2,559,123  2,206,287  1,893,810  352,836  16.0  312,477  16.5 
North Dakota 646,872  577,056  319,146  69,816  12.1  257,910  80.8 
Ohio 5,759,394  4,767,121  4,157,545  992,273  20.8  609,576  14.7 
Oklahoma 2,028,283  1,657,155  790,391  371,128  22.4  866,764  109.7 
Oregon 783,389  672,765  413,536  110,624  16.4  259,229  62.7 
Pennsylvania 8,720,017  7,665,111  6,302,115  1,054,906  13.8  1,362,996  21.6 
Rhode Island 604,397  542,610  428,556  61,787  11.4  114,054  26.6 
South Carolina 1,683,724  1,515,400  1,340,316  168,324  11.1  175,084  13.1 
South Dakota 636,547  583,888  401,570  52,659  9.0  182,318  45.4 
Tennessee 2,337,885  2,184,789  2,020,616  153,096  7.0  164,173  8.1 
Texas 4,663,228  3,896,542  3,048,710  766,686  19.7  847,832  27.8 
Utah 449,396  373,351  276,749  76,045  20.4  96,602  34.9 
Vermont 352,428  355,956  343,641  −3,528  −1.0  12,315  3.6 
Virginia 2,309,187  2,061,612  1,854,184  247,575  12.0  207,428  11.2 
Washington 1,356,621  1,141,990  518,103  214,631  18.8  623,887  120.4 
West Virginia 1,463,701  1,221,119  958,800  242,582  19.9  262,319  27.4 
Wisconsin 2,632,067  2,333,860  2,069,042  298,207  12.8  264,818  12.8 
Wyoming 194,402  145,965  92,531  48,437  33.2  53,434  57.7 

Government.—The form of government of the United States is based on the Constitution of Sept. 17, 1787, to which 10 amendments were added Dec. 15, 1791; an 11th amendment, Jan. 8, 1798; a 12th amendement, Sept. 25, 1804; a 13th amendment, Dec. 18, 1865; a 14th amendment, July 28, 1868; a 15th amendment March 30, 1870; a 16th amendment, Feb. 13, 1913; a 17th amendment, May 31, 1913; an 18th amendment, Jan. 16, 1920, a 19th amendment, Aug. 26, 1920. By the Constitution the government of the nation is intrusted to three separate authorities, the Executive, the Legislative, and the Judiciary. The executive power is vested in a President, who holds his office during the term of four years, and is elected, together with a Vice-President chosen for the same term, in the mode prescribed as follows: “Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of senators and representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress; but no senator or representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be appointed an elector.” The Constitution enacts that “the Congress may determine the time of choosing the electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes, which day shall be the same throughout the United States”; and further, that “no person except a natural-born citizen, or a citizen of the United States at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained the age of 35 years, and been 14 years a resident within the United States.” The President is commander-in-chief of the army and navy and of the militia in the service of the Union. He has the power of a veto on all laws passed by Congress; but, notwithstanding his veto, any bill may become a law on its being afterward passed by each House of Congress by a two-thirds vote. The Vice-President is ex officio President of the Senate. The presidential succession is fixed by chapter 4 of the acts of the 49th Congress, 1st session. In case of the removal, death, resignation, or inability of both the President and Vice-President, then the Secretary of State shall act as President till the disability of the President or Vice-President is removed or a President is elected. If there be no Secretary of State, then the Secretary of the Treasury will act; and the remainder of the order of succession is: Secretary of War, Attorney-General, Postmaster-General, Secretary of the Navy, and Secretary of the Interior (the office of Secretary of Agriculture was created after the passage of the act). The acting President must, on taking office, convene Congress, if not at the time in session, in extraordinary session, giving 20 days' notice. This act applies only to such Cabinet officers as shall have

  1. 1.0 1.1 A minus sign ( − ) denotes decrease