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14
The Life of
 

O'er France and all her almost kingly dukedoms,
Or lay these bones in an unworthy urn, 228
Tombless, with no remembrance over them:
Either our history shall with full mouth
Speak freely of our acts, or else our grave,
Like Turkish mute, shall have a tongueless mouth, 232
Not worshipp'd with a waxen epitaph.

Enter Ambassadors of France.

Now are we well prepar'd to know the pleasure
Of our fair cousin Dauphin; for we hear
Your greeting is from him, not from the king.

First Amb. May 't please your majesty to give us leave 237
Freely to render what we have in charge;
Or shall we sparingly show you far off
The Dauphin's meaning and our embassy? 240

K. Hen. We are no tyrant, but a Christian king;
Unto whose grace our passion is as subject
As are our wretches fetter'd in our prisons:
Therefore with frank and with uncurbed plainness 244
Tell us the Dauphin's mind.

First Amb.Thus then, in few.
Your highness, lately sending into France,
Did claim some certain dukedoms, in the right
Of your great predecessor, King Edward the Third. 248
In answer of which claim, the prince our master
Says that you savour too much of your youth,
And bids you be advis'd there's nought in France

231 freely: generously
233 worshipp'd: honored
waxen: perishable
245 in few: briefly
251 be advis'd: consider