Page:Notes and Queries - Series 11 - Volume 11.djvu/157

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us. xi. FEB. 20, 1915.] .NOTES AND QUERIES.


147


period, 1809. The printers are Martin & Hunter, 10, Hay -market, Birmingham. Its title would seem to be somewhat of a mis- nomer ; for the book deals almost entirely with managers and actors, the former meet- ing with much castigation. The authoress's tinhappy experiences led to an early severance from the stage on the part of herself and her husband. The tone of the work is of a highly moral, instructive character, with a similarity of style to 'Rebecca; or, The Victim of Duplicity,' which strongly suggests Mrs. Holbrook as the writer of that novel -also. Search for the missing third volume of "* Rebecca ' has hitherto been made in vain, but is still prosecuted with energy. Will readers of ' N. & Q.' join therein ?

CECIL CLARKE. Junior Athenaeum Club.

PHYSIOLOGICAL SURNAMES. The follow- ing list of authentic surnames identical with the words for parts or characteristic actions of the human body has been collected from various sources, and is, I think, worth putting upon record. I should be most grateful if any of your readers could make additions to it.


Ankles

Armes

Back

Beard

Belley

Blink

Blood

Body

Bone

Bowel

Brain

Breathing

Browe

Oalf

heek

Chest

Chew

Chinn


Collabone

Elbow

Eyes

Finger

Fleshe

Foot

Forehead

Gall

Gullett

Gum

Hair

Hand

Head

Heart

Heel

Joynt

Kidney

Knee


Essex Lodge, Ewell.


Kneebone

Laugher

Legg

Limb

Lipp

Loines

Lung

Marrow

Memory

Nail

Neck.

Pallett

Palmes

Papps

Quick

Reason

Rump

Sense

LEONARD C,


Shin

Skin

Skull

Smiles

Soul

Spittle

Talk

Taste

Tear

Temple

Toe

Toes

Tongue

Tooth

Vein

Voice

Whisker

Wrist

PRICE.


LOCKS ON RIVERS AND CANALS. At a recent meeting of the Waterways Associa- tion it was stated that an extensive scheme for the further development and utilization of canals and canalized rivers in this country will probably be carried out after the War. It may be of interest, therefore, to try and ascertain to whom we owe the system of locks on rivers and canals, a query which, a well-known authority tells us, it is, perhaps, impossible to solve. Some writers ascribe them to Leonardo da Vinci, but I am not aware on what grounds. It is certain, how- tever, that artificial inland waterways were


known centuries before his time, the Im- perial Canal in China, of about a thousand miles in length, having been completed in 1289. Here the boats were hoisted from the different levels by means of machinery over sluices. The finest early specimen in Europe is probably the Languedoc Canal, constructed in the reign of Louis XIV. at the end of the seventeenth century. It connects the Bay of Biscay with the Mediter- ranean, and was finished in 1681. It is about 148 miles long, rises at its summit some 600 ft. above the sea, and embraces upwards of one hundred locks and fifty aqueducts. It is curious that no canals were made in England until nearly a century later. J. LAND FEAR LUCAS.

Glendora, Hindhead, Surrey.

THE OLDEST MILK-STALL IN LONDON. (See ante, p. 69. ) Amongst the obituary notices in The Yorkshire Post of 16 Jan., 1915, appears the following :

" The death has taken place in Leeds, at the age of 81, of Mrs. Kitchen, mother of Mr. Fred Kitchen, the comedian. She was the widow of R. H. Kitchen, a narlequin and clown, and was a victim of the Mall Improvement Scheme in 1905, when the authorities ordered that the picturesque milk-stall carried on in St. James's Park by Mrs. Kitchen and a sister, should be done away with. The couple refused to leave until forcibly evicted, but, as the result of a petition to King Edward, Mrs. Kitchen was allowed to erect the pretty kiosk which stands just within the Park railings, opposite the Horse Guards. The milk-stall, it is said, has been kept by the womenfolk of the Kitchen family for 300 years."

T. SHEPHERD.

" ROYAL OAK." One has been accus- tomed to associate this term with Charles II. and Boscobel, but an earlier use is to be found in one of the myriad fugitive publica- tions of the Civil War/ This was

" The Colchester Spie. Truly informing the Kingdome of the estate of that gallant town, and the attempts of Fairfax against it : with some other remarkable passages from the English and Scots Army, from his Highnesse the Prince of Wales, also from Westminster & London. From Munday August 14. to Munday Aug. 28, 1648."

In this are the lines :

The Saints grieve for you, and like Toads do croak. Belching complaints gainst Englands Royall Oak,

ALFRED F. ROBBINS.

THE WHITE FLAG. Jehan de Waurin in his ' Chronicle ' (Rolls Series), when narrating the events of the year 1444, relates that while the combined Christian fleet was at anchor in the Bosphorus a Turk appeared on the shore displaying a white pennon -on