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Page:Notes and Queries - Series 12 - Volume 10.djvu/183

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12 S. X. FEB. 25, 1922.] NOTES AND QUERIES. 145 Frances an infant daughter of Rich : Reynolds buryed the same day. Elizabeth the wife of John Jessup buryed Dec ember the 16th. Emme the wife of John Skea was buryed December the 19th. John an infant son of John Jessup buryed December the 25th. Anne an infant daughter of John Langham buryed December 26th. Margery an infant daughter of John Jessup , buryed December the 30th. Joan the wife of Thomas Buck was buryed j January the 15th. Mary the wife of Edmund Telford buryed ! January the 26th. John the son of Tho : Hewlett was buryed the i ame day. John the infant son of Roger Peck was buryed | January the 25. Ailce a child daughter of Edward Cockett was | fcuryedjFebruary the 23d. (55) ARTHUR T. WINN. SIR RICHARD WILLYS, TRAITOR. (See ante, pp. 101, 123.) IN "addition to the ' Narrative ' printed by the Rev. Dr. John Willcock, and the long letter by Sir Samuel Morland to Secretary Nicholas, dated Nov. 14, 1660, and printed in the fourth volume of the ' Nicholas Papers,' by Sir G. F. Warner, there is another account by Morland in the British Museum which should also be taken into account (Add. MSS., 28094, ff. 9 and 10). This completes the tale, with a few additional particulars. I should point out that Major Thomas Henshaw, who carried Morland's letter to Charles II., is confused, in the ' D.N.B.,' with his cousin, Thomas Henshaw of Ken- sington (see Historical MSS. Commission's "Sixth Report, Appendix, p. 367b). The following narrative has no date, but states that it was written seventeen years later on. The King appears to have revised his | opinion of the value of Morland's services, ' when he found out that Morland was Thurloe's intemediary in dealing with the twelve traitors who had divulged the plans of the Royalists, and Clarendon obtained the return of the letter in which His Majesty had rashly promised Morland the Garter. A brief narrative of ye services done to ye Crown by Sr. S. Morland. Immediately upon Thurloe's trepanning Dr. Hewet to ye death, S. Morland resolved to do ye King what service he could, detesting ye cruelties acted by Cromwell, and did so above a year and a half before he durst discover himself. At last hee did discover himself and sent ye King a letter by Major Henshaw, discovering Sr Rich. Willis and about 12 gentlemen more who were in salary with Cromwell for betraying ye King, some residing in England and others at Bruxels. Besides that hee kept weekly corre- spondence with the King and for above a year together never went to bed without a just fear of being taken out before ye morning and having his flesh pulled from his bones with hot pincers. When Richard Cr. was turned out, it was hee alone who made such jealousy between Lambert and Scott that Scott was getting an order to send Lambert to ye Tower, and Lambert having timely notice of it by my Ld Marsham (who then held correspondence with Morland) gott on horse- back and turned out ye Rump ; [i.e., in October, 1659] which, under God, was the first true means of bringing in ye King, and without which hee might probably have been kept out till this day. When Lambert went down to ye North in triumph with that famous body of horse (with an intention to have destroyed Munk) it was M. alone who raysed such jealousies between Lambert and ye councel of officers at Wallingford House, that hee was ordered not to march one day, but by new orders sent by an express from Walling- ford House, which broke his army and dispersed them. In ye business of Sir George Booth, Sir Rich. Willis had hired a house in Kent on purpose to have given up ye person of ye King to Sir H. Vane and Mr Scott, where the King had been immediately murthered. And the King and Duke was ready to come over, when Morland gave him timely notice of it, and so prevented ye murther both of King and Duke. After all was done and over, instead of psr- forming any of those great promises, hee has now for 17 years gone up and down as a man of another world and no solid provision made for his family, and exposed to scorn and byword of Sir Richard Willis and others, who say ye king does not trust him. And what hee now beggs for is about 500 p.an. in some certain estate in long leases of 99 years as may amount to that value that so when hee dyes (not knowing how soon it may bee) his family may not bee exposed to want and beggery. (Indorsed) Sir Samuel Morlands papers. Copy of the Kings lettr to Mr Morland sent him from Brussels by Majr Henshaw. Dated 7 July, 1659. I have received yours of ye 15th of ye last and ye rest J. H. sent mee from you, and I de- spatched ye person sent by him ye next day, in ye manner you advised and fully to his satisfac- tion. So that I hope God Almighty will despose that affayr to Our wish and that ye Fleet will not bee gone out of ye Sound before my letter bee delivered, wherein I have offered all that may move. If the misfortune should be such that he should be come away you will find some way to assure him of all that he can wish from me. But if he go once on shore I cannot imagine he ever will be restored to ye same power again. For your self your merit is, and will bee so great