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NOTES OF THE MEXICAN WAR.

law-abiding people, and it would be a great blessing to this country if some more of our towns and cities were inhabited with some of the same material. There would be no occasion of having any lawyers, poor-houses, jails, etc.

The people, as at Beaver, brought edibles, and particularly the ladies (God bless these dear angels). I cannot praise them too much. They seemed to be the only people who care and look into the welfare and comfort of the soldiers.

I find the people here are great friends of Gen. Scott. They asked many questions in regard to his removal, and the opinions of soldiers of Gen. Scott. They were answered by the soldiers (as at many other places), speaking in the highest terms of Gen. Scott as a leader, and of his victorious campaign in Mexico; the many obstacles and embarrassments, which were constantly thrown in his way by our jealous government, were all done for the purpose of breaking down Gen. Scott's popularity and fair name. We also style it outrageous, unjust and infamous; a reproach to our civilization; a stigma of the deepest dye to our government forever.

The steamboat bell now rung for all to get on board; after which we started without waiting for the arrival of the "Jewess." We soon came in sight of the smoky city Pittsburgh; at which city we arrived at 4 o'clock, p.m. Here we found steamboats, and other water crafts; as well as all along the wharves for miles the citizens had gathered. Also the housetops, doorways, windows, etc., were crowded to see the heroes of the Mexican war. The bands on the steamboats were playing stirring pieces; winding up with "Sweet Home." The cheering and firing of cannons and other firearms was immense. The people were wild with enthusiasm.

Before we were fastened to the wharf we were met by our Captain, William F. Small, who was was greeted with hearty cheers from his old company. We were all much pleased in seeing him again. He made a little interesting speech to the soldiers.