Page:Notes of the Mexican war 1846-47-48.djvu/607

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NOTES OF THE MEXICAN WAR.

It will be remembered that Capt. W. F. Small left us at Jalapa City, Novamber 24, 1847, to take his seat in the State Senate, to which position he was elected October 12, 1847.

The Captain informs us that there is great preparations being made in Philadelphia to receive the soldiers. We are now fastened to the shore, and ordered to land on the wharf and form into line; when Judge Wilkins, of Pittsburgh, was introduced, and made a telling and applauding speech, touching upon our gallantry and triumphant achievements of our hardships, sufferings, etc., which was answered by Col. Wynkoop; which speeches were received with great applause. After this ceremony was over we were ordered to march through several of the principal streets with our old torn banner unfolded to the breeze.

We marched on and passed Lieut.-Col. Black's residence; where an immense concourse of people had assembled, and who greeted us with hearty cheers. We gave Mrs. Col. Black three rousing cheers, which she received with a very polite bow, and waving her handkerchief.

The streets we marched through were so crowded that it was almost impossible to get along, so anxious were the people to see the second conquerors of Mexico come.

After marching through several streets we came back to the steamboat again, and there were dismissed for the balance of the evening and night. This caused a good deal of dissatisfaction among the soldiers, on account of the citizens of Pittsburgh never saying once, will you take something to eat or even to drink; a relish a soldier always expects to get, particularly after marching in the hot sun. Some of our men were heard to swear and say that if they had known that they were to get nothing to eat or even to drink they wouldn't have marched through their black streets. Some had pies and cakes left that the people of Beaver and Economy had given to us, and we fell back on them, but those who hadn't anything left had to fall back on government rations.