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Page:The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets, Volume 1.djvu/405

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395
WALLER.

16.

If gold or wealth of most esteemed deare,

If iewels rich, thou diddest hold in prise,
Such store thereof, such plentie haue I seen,
As to a greedie minde might well suffice:
With that downe trickled many a filuer teare,
Two christall streames fell from her watrie eies;
Part of her sad misfortunes than she told,
And wept, and with her wept that shepherd old.

17.

With speeches kinde, he gan the virgin deare

Towards his cottage gently home to guide;
His aged wife there made her homely cheare,
Yet welcomde her, and plast her by her side.
The Princesse dond a poore pastoraes geare,
A
kerchiefe course upon her head she tide;
But yet her gestures and her lookes
(I
gesse)
Were such,
as
ill
beseem'd
a
shepherdesse.

18.


Not those rude garments could obscure, and hide
The heau'nly beautie
of
her angels face,
Nor was her princely
of
spring damnifide,
Or ought disparagde,
by
those labours bace;
Her little flocks
to
pasture would she guide,
And milke her goates, and
in
their folds them place,
Both cheese and butter could she make, and frame
Her selfe
to
please the shepherd and his dame,

POMFRET.