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Page:The Sikh Religion, its gurus, sacred writings and authors Vol 6.djvu/420

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408
BHAGATS OF THE GRANTH SAHIB

The days that pass in enjoying them are profitable to my life.[1]

XC

Farid, my dry body hath become a skeleton ; ravens peck at the hollows of my hands and feet ;
Up to the present, God hath not come to mine aid ; behold His servant’s misfortune !

XCI

O ravens, you have searched my skeleton and eaten all my flesh;
But touch not these two eyes, as I hope to behold my Beloved

XCII

O ravens, peck not at my skeleton ; if haply you sit on it, then fly away ;
At any rate, eat not the flesh from where my Lord dwelleth in my skeleton.

XCIII

Farid, the wretched tomb calleth out, ‘ O homeless, come home !
‘ You shall assuredly come to me ; fear not death.’

XCIV

How many have departed before my very eyes !
Farid, men have different anxieties, and I have mine.

XCV

God saith, ‘ If thou reform thyself, thou shalt meet Me ; on meeting Me thou shalt be happy ;
‘ Farid, if thou remain Mine, all the world shall be thine.’

XCVI

How long shall the trees on the banks retain their place ?
Farid, if thou put water into a frail vessel, how long will it remain ?

  1. Dates and honey are promised to Muhammadans in heaven, but Farīd means that they can be obtained on earth.