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Page:The White House Cook Book.djvu/269

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BREAD. 245

VIRGINIA BROWN BREAD.

ONE pint of corn meal; pour over enough boiling water to thor- oughly scald it ; when cool add one pint of light, white bread sponge, mix well together, add one cupful of molasses, and Graham flour enough to mold ; this will make two loaves ; when light, bake in a mod- erate oven one and a half hours.

RHODE ISLAND BROWN BREAD.

Two AND one-half cupfuls of corn meal, one and one-half cupfuls of rye meal, one egg, one cup of molasses, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one toaspoonful of soda, a little salt and one quart of milk. Bake in a covered dish, either earthen or iron, in a moderately hot oven three hours.

STEAMED BROWN BREAD.

ONE cup of white flour, two of Graham flour, two of Indian meal, one teaspoonful of soda, one cup of molasses, three and a half cups of milk, a little salt. Beat well and steam for four hours. This is for sour milk ; when sweet milk is used, use baking powder in place of soda.

This is improved by setting it into the oven fifteen minutes after it is slipped from the mold. To be eaten warm with butter. Most

excellent.

RYE BREAD.

To A quart of warm water stir as much wheat flour as will make a smooth batter ; stir into it half a gill of home-made yeast, and set it in a warm place to rise ; this is called setting a sponge ; let it be mixed in some vessel which will contain twice the quantity ; in the morning, put three pounds and a half of rye flour into a bowl or tray, make a hollow in the centre, pour in the sponge, add a dessertspoonful of salt, and half a small teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in a little water ; make the whole into a smooth dough, with as much warm water as may be necessary ; knead it well, cover it, and let it set in a warm place for three hours ; then knead it again, and make it into two or three loaves ; bake in a quick oven one hour, if made in two loaves, or less if the

loaves are smaller.

RYE AND CORN BREAD.

ONE quart of rye meal or rye flour, two quarts of Indian meal, scalded (by placing in a pan and pouring over it just enough boiling

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